How To Make Exercise A Lasting and Enjoyable Habit

(Breather) We’ve all heard enough excuses about how quarantine puts off fitness and puts on pounds. Enough already!

An active, fit lifestyle can happen anywhere, anytime, but it’s all about forming winning habits. In this show, you’ll gain inspiration about mindset, beliefs, and behaviors from some great former B.rad podcast guests like John Assaraf and Mark Manson. Some helpful practical tips to stay focused and motivated come from a medium.com article by Stacy Kam, and I cover those with some juicy color commentary. 

Here are some quick takeaways from the show about getting a successful exercise habit going:

1. John Assaraf urges us to pursue bite-sized, reasonable, and easily sustainable goals. As you gain momentum from doing simple stuff, you can leverage that success to increase your commitment. Do not ambitiously bite off more than you can handle and set yourself up for failure. 

2. Mark Manson says we routinely do this because we don’t appreciate how to get our rational thinking brain connected with our emotional, feeling brain. 

3. Finally, from the Stacy Kam list and perhaps my most favorite motivator of all time – get yourself a dog and give the animal the life it deserves! Getting the dog out is mandatory and transcends the fickle forces of your motivation and judgement of the weather. 

Don’t forget about the importance of making sure you have a Plan B in place, because you never know what will happen that could throw you off your pre-planned schedule. There are also some great apps, like All Trails, that can help you stay on track by keeping your workouts fun and interesting!

TIMESTAMPS:

Here’s how to form a powerful and sustainable habit of exercise and fitness. [01:27]

We have two brains: the feeling brain and the thinking brain. [02:11]

We are often dealing with childhood programming that locks us in to repeated patterns. [04:20]

This process is not easy. You need to learn to connect the two parts of your brain. [07:29]

Do you have a schedule that works for you? [11:58]

You want to do something that is simple, repeatable, and doable. And don’t judge the effort. [14:12]

Have a Plan B. Don’t worry about the weather. [17:08]

It’s good to get a training partner or group. Track your data but be careful doing so. [19:17]

Learn the proper technique for running. [23:02]

Vary your routes when exercising outdoors. Destination bike rides are fun. [24:29]

Combine the new habit you want to have with an already existing habit. [27:21]

Make bite-size goals so as not to take on too much and set yourself up for failure. [30:22]

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B.Rad Podcast

Brad (1m 23s): Hey, who’s getting tired of people, giving excuses about why they fell off their exercise momentum due to restrictions quarantines. I am because there’s no excuses and here’s how to form a powerful, sustainable habit of exercise and fitness. I read an interesting article on medium.com. And so I’m going to honor that and go through some of the comments written by Stacy Kam. But I also have some stuff to say out of the gate, honoring some of the great podcast interviews and people giving you tips about personal growth, peak performance. Brad (2m 4s): John Assaraf was one of them. And I love his insight that you have to set goals that are really doable and reasonable. Something that you can shake your head at and go, of course I can do that. That sounds so easy. And then when you have these little successes, you leverage these successes from the baby steps you take, instead of which we usually find happening is setting these wonderful, awesome, daunting goals. That sounds so good on paper, but in real life, you can’t seem to align with it. Then you get discouraged, then you fall off and there goes the rinse and repeat pattern. Bummer. Here’s what’s happening here. Remember my show with Mark Manson and my wrap-up show of his insights from his two books. Brad (2m 48s): I think that’s maybe where I got into this more, but he talks about how we have two brains, the thinking brain and the feeling brain. So the thinking brain, the executive function, making this elaborate goal, writing it down. I’m going to go to the gym three times a week. I’m going to do two of these classes and then work out with the trainer the other day. I’m not going to eat dessert anymore. I’m sick of it and you write it down and it really feels good to your thinking brain, but you need to get buy-in from your feeling brain, from your emotional brain, the emotional feeling brain actually rules over our thinking brain. But guess what? Re pretend that it doesn’t in our thinking brain. Are you with me here? This is Mark Manson insight. Brad (3m 29s): It’s brilliant. So how do we get emotional buy-in because after all only emotion motivates us to take action. So getting that buy-in is key. And here’s the solution. You have to connect your thinking brain with your feeling brain. When you’re pondering logical life decisions, you want to ask your feeling brain to weigh in. Weigh in on all logical decisions by asking yourself how you feel about it, and then assess the answer without judgment. Then you need to convince your feeling brain that it’s going to benefit. This is where we have to engage in those visualization exercises, doing the mind movie, the vision board, how will it feel to be behind the wheel of that new car or to have the body of your dreams? Brad (4m 17s): Oh my gosh, it’s going to feel great. I’m getting so emotionally excited about it. Now I can get buy in to what my logical brain wrote down on this piece of paper, about going to the gym three times a week, no matter what, or setting the alarm or whatever’s on there, that your emotional brain is not quite buying into yet. And you know why this happens often is that our feeling brain deep down, deep down Bette Midler said, deep down feels like we don’t deserve this success due to flawed childhood programming from ages zero to seven. Remember, we’ve heard that in a few shows, especially the insights from Dr. Bruce Lipton’s book, the Biology of Belief, and so many other people trumping hitting this high point. Brad (4m 60s): Now as a common theme that we’re walking around a lot of times operating, operating from the subconscious and playing out our flawed childhood programming over and over again. Listen to my most recent show with Dr. Wendy Walsh, how that plays out in relationship dynamics, where we’re repeating the patterns that we learned in childhood, because we’re trying to solve the problem this time around. That’s why a high propensity, for example, children of alcoholics tend to engage in relationships with alcoholics. It’s a high pattern there because you’re drawn to this because you recognize the familiar pattern and you want to solve it this time. So we want to break free from being controlled by flawed childhood programming and these undeserving feelings that we reinforce every time we fail with a diet and exercise plan. Brad (5m 48s): And instead, get that emotion stirred up the excitement and the emotional payoff of life change and going after these goals and achieving them, Mark Manson again, quote, our self worth is the sum of our emotions over time. If we can’t equalize, then we accept inferiority shame and low self-worth. But he argues for eight persuasively. That self worth is an illusion. It’s a form of persistent low level narcissism because you imagine yourself as something special and something, something separate from the world, right? Whether you have low self-worth or irrationally high self-worth, it’s the same thing. Brad (6m 31s): So your identity such as, I’m not great about adhering to an exercise program. I’m not really a morning person. This identity will stay your identity until any event changes it. And there’s two ways to get out of this trap. First, we examine the narratives of our lives and reposition them. That’s where we’re talking about the, the, the mind movie, the vision board, the visualizations, the manifesting, the repeating, the turnaround statements that we talk about in the book. Two Meals a Day. That’s a Jack Canfield technique where if you identify some flawed programming and some things that aren’t working right for you, some flawed and damaging self-limiting beliefs, you create a turnaround statement. Brad (7m 13s): Like I am open to being a more dedicated fitness enthusiast, and you say them over and over. I think he wants you to say a few times a day for a couple minutes, for a month straight. And then you start to embrace this new possibility. So examining the narratives of your lives and repositioning them, and second visualizing the future that you want for yourself and making that your new identity, you’re going to be the gym rat the person that shows up regularly and enjoys it and feels great. So you let the feeling brain try on this new identity and then that’s how you become accustomed to it. Now, is this going to be easy? Brad (7m 54s): No, it actually should be a difficult exercise because it means you’re getting to the heart of things and that you’re actually going to transform into that fitness freak. Who’s always at the gym in the front row on time, enjoying the exercise, smiling the whole way through. I’m giving the example of struggling to adhere to a fitness program. Right. But if you can’t relate to that, like I can’t relate to that to just struggling, to adhere to an exercise program because it’s been part of my life since I was seven years old. And I saw the 1972 Olympics in Munich and was captivated by the athletes. And I started training for, for Montreal, I guess 76, maybe I was a little young, but I went out in my backyard after elementary school and I’d practice my favorite events, including building my own high jump facility and bringing the beanbags out there. Brad (8m 45s): So that was, you know, dating back quite a long time. That’s almost 50 years where exercise has been an automatic, right. But if I can’t relate to that example, you can, in whatever blank you want, I can identify with flawed values relating to money and financial responsibility. So here’s my thinking brain. Guess what? I studied accounting in college. That was my minor. So I’m pretty good about where to put things on the balance sheet, budgeting, planning, all of these concepts are very familiar to me, but I did not get, or I have not at times got buy-in from my feeling brain. Therefore, what happens if you don’t get buy-in from your feeling emotional brain and you have money in your pocket, it burns a hole through your pocket, right? Brad (9m 31s): Can anyone relate to that? If you can’t relate to the exercise example? Yeah. Irresponsible spending, not saving or investing wisely, engaging in panic behavior. For example, people who blow out of the market when there’s a dip, because they get panicked, anxious, nervous. John Assaraf admitted to that himself. He says in his story where, you know, he’s had the, a one in lost fortunes twice. He goes, I realized that I was really good at making money. Just not very good at saving or investing. So these blocks occur in whatever example you can conjure up. And this is how we’re going to break through that and connect the thinking brain and the feeling brain. Brad (10m 12s): Okay. So we want to devise an awesome plan with our thinking brain that will make for a great long-term lifestyle, providing both short-term gratification, instant gratification, right, for that emotional brain and long-term satisfaction. For example, my precious morning routine that I’m so excited about and talk about so frequently. Go look on YouTube, Brad Kearns morning routine. I’ve been doing it every day without fail for four years straight. It needs me feeling great right away. Right. I feel more fluid and flexible and energized. I’m, it’s kind of the wake-up call, especially when I do the yoga wheel move in the middle of the morning routine, a very difficult move. Brad (10m 54s): And when I pull down from that sort of an inverted pose, my brain is filled with oxygen and blood circulation. And if I was feeling a little groggy before that, I’m doing good. As I continue through the sequences, that mean so much to me and helped me so much with my fitness goals and elevating the fitness platform from which I launched all formal workouts. So the morning routine is locked in there. I feel good right away. And I also feel good about the long-term commitment to it. So I have total buy-in from my feeling brain to this program that my thinking brain thinks is such a great idea. So, because it feels great and I’ve built some momentum. Brad (11m 34s): Now, I feel deserving to wake up every morning and take this personal time for myself, do something for myself, that’s enjoyable and it feels super easy and doable. So that means that I’m not going to fail and let down my feeling brain and feeling like a dork. I bring it on every single day without any hesitation or necessity to apply a willpower or things like that. So that’s kind of the setup that I’m inspired by Mark Manson, John Assaraf and putting these insights together to connect that thinking and feeling brain. Then some more practical tips from Stacy Kam’s article on medium.com. And of course my color commentary, the first one she mentioned is don’t break the chain, the Jerry Seinfeld strategy. Brad (12m 20s): And that flows nicely into my comments about my morning routine. So Seinfeld’s now world famous strategy is to have a simple calendar and write an X on a day when he was able to sit down and write jokes. And he’s got a book out now he’s famous for his work ethic, his long career in Hollywood. And it was driven by pure, raw hard work where he just put in the hours put in the time. I love his standard advice for any standup comic who comes and ask them, Oh, should I get my social media on point and do some cross promoting and blah, blah, blah. And Seinfeld says the first and foremost thing that you should do is work on your act and then let let everything else kind of flow, right? Brad (13m 5s): All the opportunities will flow to you if you continue to work on your act. So Seinfeld has this strategy of writing an X on the calendar on the day that he was able to sit down and write jokes. Now, if you start to accumulate a 27 X’s in a row or whatever it is now, you are enrolled in this streak. So it starts to take on some meaning that you don’t want to break the chain. And I can definitely relate to this with my morning routine because I’m not a, a streaky regimented guy. I kind of, you know, answer to my own calling every single day in, in work and in personal life and a flexibility with my schedule. And so I never really had something to anchor my day until I started this morning routine four years ago. Brad (13m 51s): Now, here’s the thing. If it’s overwhelming and you try to take on too much and put that X on there, every time you run more than 10 miles, you’re not going to have a, a streak because it’s just unsustainable. I was riding on the ski lift yesterday with the gentleman who was talking about when COVID started, Oh, his fitness routine took off. It was fantastic because now he had free time and he went and shot baskets every single day at the park and jogged over there. And then at home, he did a, a sequence of stretching, moves, followed by a a hundred pushups or whatever his thing was. And it went and went and went. And then when he fell off a little bit at some point, right? Brad (14m 32s): Cause that was a lot of time and energy. Then he just completely lost interest in keeping this streak alive. So John Assaraf emphasizing that point too, that you want to do something that’s doable and sustainable so that you can accumulate a streak. And it doesn’t feel like too much trouble. In my case, if you go on YouTube and like I asked and type in Brad Kearns morning routine, you will actually see two videos pop up. One of them published in 2017 and that was my initial original morning exercise mobility routine. And then you see the fun and games have published in late 2020, where you have the fast motion where I go through everything in about 45 seconds. And then I explain it over the ensuing minutes of the video, but that initial routine was much, much easier. Brad (15m 17s): It took much less time, but that’s what got me started out of the gate. And then over time as I started to enjoy the experience and realize the benefits, what I would do was I would very carefully add a new exercise, something more difficult, more reps, whatever it was. And then I’d established that as the template. And I do the exact same thing every day, going forward, maybe it’s two months down the road and here I go, adding a new exercise may be subtracting something that I don’t feel like doing anymore. And that’s the way it flows. So again, to keep that habit in place and make it as easy as possible, we want that thing to be repeatable every single day. So you don’t have to think about it. Brad (15m 57s): You don’t have to apply any creative energy. You just wake up, hit the deck and start in with it. And don’t judge the effort. You just do it no matter what, even if you’re not in the mood. Okay. Okay. Another cool tip from the article only listen to that audio book or podcast while you’re running. So it’s a special privilege and you can’t indulge in your digital entertainment unless you’re out there exercising or only allow yourself to watch The Bachelor while running on the treadmill. For example, want to know how that book ended, go out on the run and find out cool. Next tip: get a dog. Oh my gosh, this is the most precious and wonderful tip I can imagine is answering to something bigger than yourself and the variations of your moods and your motivation. Brad (16m 48s): So this is the essence of being an accountable and reliable member of society, right? People at work can count on you, people in your family. And when you decide to own an animal, you owe that animal, the lifestyle that it deserves. And so dogs need to get out into the open space, fresh air, do their business, get their exercise. And, Oh my gosh, for my entire adult life dating back to my training days, the dog was the single greatest source of motivation imaginable. It was beyond motivation. It was just automatic. The dog’s eyes are looking at you like, Hey, is it time for our morning run? Yet? Of course it is. Let me put off everything else. Cause how can I turn it down? So get that dog and give it the life it deserves. Brad (17m 32s): Here’s the next tip called, have a plan B. So if it’s too hot outside or it’s raining, get that gym membership. So you can go in and use their treadmill. And that’s great. We want to see people with a plan B at home when we’re on quarantine and the gyms closed, otherwise they get thrown off. So yeah, definitely a sensible advice. But I also have a little input here on, on the plan B concept and that is to quit whining and worrying about perfect conditions. So these excuses that your gym closed down for quarantine, or it’s too crowded, or the weather is too hot or too cold, that stuff needs to go in the garbage can. Brad (18m 14s): I mean, think about the example of the dog. My dog never complains whether it’s raining, snowing, dark, if she’s lying on her favorite bed and comfortable blanket by the fire on a warm, cozy evening, Oh, call her name. She is at the door in two seconds, ready for another exercise. So we need to kind of toughen up sometimes when we’re looking and seeking those perfect conditions. And I’m sorry to come on. So harsh here, but I see that. So commonly with athletes where, you know, we’re holding our finger up and seeing if the wind’s going to hit it too hard in order to cancel our workout. So get out there and accept any weather conditions that you face realizing that the ability to experience weather is a gift. Brad (18m 57s): And there’s a lot of people let’s say stuck in a hospital bed where it’s 72 degrees Fahrenheit all the time and the weather’s perfect, no complaints. Boy, wouldn’t you like to get out there and feel what it’s like to be in a snow storm or in the oppressive heat of summer, or what have you so enough about the weather and perfect conditions. Next tip is the group energy wonderful, you know, getting together with a training partner, joining a group training exercise program, or a group class at the gym, right? I mean, it’s a lot to ask to be self motivated all the time. And I remember back in my triathlon training days, I did a lot of training alone, usually because I wanted to get the exact workout experience. Brad (19m 44s): You know, again, this is at the professional level, you’re not doing it for social or for entertainment. So I knew exactly what I wanted to accomplish and training each day. And I didn’t want to deviate from that. And I also wanted to create the most efficient and comfortable schedule that was convenient for me not having to drive too far, whatever enabled me to get more, more rest and better recovery. So that’s great if you’re totally dialed in, and you’re a professional competitor training for the Olympics and your coach emails, you, here’s what you’re going to do. You go out there and execute, but for most people, boy, it’s so much easier and so much more fun when you can share the experience and not have to worry about conjuring up your own personal source of motivation every single time. Brad (20m 29s): So I loved when I would engage with other athletes and I would definitely make a point of doing that when it was some really serious stuff like, you know, going for an all-day bike ride, much more fun to do that in a group rather than by yourself. But I’ll never forget one time when I was visiting Boulder, Colorado to spend a week training with Kenny Souza, the greatest athlete of all time. And he was on top and on fire at that point in his career. And he was just a training machine every single day, getting out there and going for hours and hours. And one day we were talking about doing a long bike ride and just, you know, hanging around in the morning, putz around getting ready. Brad (21m 9s): And I remember ducking into the bathroom and he said, all right, catch you later. I’m like, wait a sec. You know, do you mind waiting for me? I came out here to train with you. I don’t know where I’m going. I don’t, I’m not familiar with the area. And he goes, Oh sure, no problem. But you know, a five-hour bike ride to him was such a routine event that he could take it or leave it as, as in terms of waiting for me to be a training partner alongside him. And it was pretty memorable exchange there because that’s, you know, the highest level of focus and motivation where you’re, you’re not, you’re not even worried about who’s coming with you or who’s not coming with you, but again, the group energy, such a wonderful part of the fitness experience and pretty obvious. Brad (21m 51s): So if you are struggling or a little bit losing your focus, whatever the conditions are set up a, a partner or a group, okay. Track your data is the next suggestion quote in the article. Some runners do great when just running by feel personally, I’m obsessed with data, looking at numbers and seeing my heart rate, decrease my pace, getting quicker, gives me the motivation to get out there and keep improving my numbers. It’s a numbers game for all those left side brainers out there. Okay. Point taken and certainly tracking and logging can be a nice source of motivation and accountability. I also have seen in my many years coaching athletes and being immersed into these extreme endurance sports where you’re talking about a population of type a people that this stuff can kind of also get in your way of complete appreciation of experience and also making the best training decisions. Brad (22m 45s): So you become a slave to your training log or all the data that you can quantify, and that can kind of push you in the wrong direction when sometimes you need a rest and recovery, but you’re going to override that due to this obsession with technology and data tracking. So be careful using tracking and data as a motivator. And ideally your greatest source of motivation is going to be the pure joy of the experience. And when you’re out there physically performing some of that joy and appreciation comes from the connection of the mind and body. So you’re focusing on your breathing. You’re focusing on your technique. Brad (23m 26s): I have that wonderful viral video on YouTube, Brad Kearns, running technique instruction, where I’m talking about the importance of refining good technique, even in a sport, as simple as running. There’s so much difference between losing energy and being inefficient as opposed to executing the proper stride every time, even when you’re just there jogging. So there’s always something to think about and concentrate on in terms of technique, in terms of monitoring your exertion level or your perceived exertion level. So shutting that off by listening to music, listening to a podcast that can be one step away from that complete appreciation of the experience that said, I often use my exercise time to listen to podcasts or audio books or music, or make a phone call. Brad (24m 16s): And that’s just a personal choice and there’s only so many hours in the day, but it could conceivably be disconnecting you from that complete appreciation of the mind body experience of exercise. So I’m going to advocate for at least once in a while, just going out there and listening to the sound of your breath and focusing on your technique and having that be part of your overall workout experience. Not that you have to do that every single time. Okay. Here’s another tip from the list. Plan out a new route for your exercise, keep it fun and interesting by exploring a new part of town every day, exploring the unknown is exciting enough to get you out of bed and do the workout. Oh, I love this one. Brad (24m 56s): And, Oh my gosh. My favorite experience as a triathlete when I was putting a lot of time in on the bike was to plot out a point to point long distance destination, bike ride, and then just get a ride from wherever I finished that. And it was so much easier to go out there and pedal 100 miles point to point than to consider a loop and end up back home. It was just more exciting and you’re just progressing the whole way, right? You know, you’re at mile 40 or mile 70 and some of our favorite ones. Once we rode, we tried to ride from Los Angeles to Las Vegas, which is 200 hundred and 80 miles through the Mojave desert. We chose one of the hottest days the year in late July and went for it. Brad (25m 38s): And we kind of bombed out at the 200 mile mark in the middle of the Mojave desert in the town of Baker. And that’s when we jumped into the motor home and cruised into the buffet lines at Vegas, allowing the, the motor home, our support crew to take us the last 80 miles. But it was a great experience to, to be able to ride that far. I also rode to Santa Barbara and back to Los Angeles with Johnny G, that was a 200 mile bike ride and done a ton of rides up in the 150, 1160, 170 mile range. I used to ride from UC Santa Barbara when I was a college student and just getting into triathlon and I’d ride home routinely. And that was between 105 and 120 miles. Brad (26m 19s): One time I rode down to Newport Beach, 150 miles. Another time I rode from, from Los Angeles down to San Diego, 170 miles. Look, I can recite all these by memory and I know great exact memories and specific details of these rides so many years ago, because there was so much fun. So destination bike rides, fun stuff, as long as it’s safe, right? When you’re these days, riding into a new territory can be a little tricky dealing with cars and mobile devices, things that I didn’t have back in my day. Yeah. But if you’re going for a hike or a run or out there exploring nature, get that fantastic app called All Trails. You can get a free version, but you’re going to love it so much that you’re going to subscribe for. Brad (27m 2s): I think it was 60 bucks for two years and they will show you the available trails in your area, wherever you are on the globe and all kinds of different options and measurements and comments from other users. So we’re having a lot of fun exploring all the hiking trails of Lake Tahoe and doing fun, new, interesting things, super motivating. Okay, next tip is make it a combined habit. And there’s a lot of great research on this, where if you have a habit in place such as you get up every day and drive your car over to Starbucks, to get a coffee before beginning work in your new home-based quarantine job. Okay. So if you are locked into that habit, all you have to do is pair something that you want to make into a habit with the existing habit, and you’ll have a much better chance of success. Brad (27m 52s): So let’s say that you do a workout first before you allow yourself to kick into the usual habit of going to Starbucks. Love that one. Another tip is to sign up for a competitive event and have a goal out there in the future. This is a great tip for anybody because I’m so strong on the idea that you need something to charge you up every single day and a distinct peak performance goal is a wonderful thing, even if you’re not a competitive type. So for a lot of people signing up for a race, you just want to finish. That’s great. The competitive types might want to improve their time from the previous year and pinpoint a new race and all that’s great. I’ve told you about my sprinting and high jumping goals. Brad (28m 34s): So I’m totally focused and really interested in improving my personal best. It doesn’t necessarily have to be in an organized competition, so I’m not inclined to get on an airplane and fly across the country and rent a hotel room. So I can go participate in an official meet and get an official high jump height because I bought my own standards and I can carry those over to the track. Anytime I want put the bar up and pretend that it’s the Olympics. And for me, the meaning attached to my own personal peak performance is such that if I clear that high jump bar in the empty high school stadium, I will scream and celebrate like it’s the Olympic finals with 75,000 people in the stands. Brad (29m 16s): It doesn’t matter. It’s all the context, but that context is that you have something that’s really driving you and you’re really focused on, and it means a lot to you and you’re excited about it. And so the organized events that’s great, but even when we don’t have that opportunity, such as in quarantine, when all the events were canceled, I was so inspired to see the dynamic duo, the brothers, Dr. Steven and Eric Kobrine, and getting out there and performing the virtual Boston marathon. And they did it on the same day, different parts of California, hundreds of miles apart. But everyone was, you know, in enrolled in this. They were getting the text message updates and they put it out there and ran the 26 miles. Brad (29m 59s): In Eric’s case, he had some kind of a glitch with his GPS watch. And so we had to run like four or five extra miles in 95 degree heat after finishing the Boston marathon. He went out there and trudged through what he knew was extra distance. So he could get the credit along with the rest of the virtual community. Oh my goodness. But that’s kind of cool to have a, an actual event. Even if it’s a virtual event, it can still mean a lot to you. And boy, those are a lot of great tips and concepts to think about to noodle on maybe pick and choose things that you think will appeal and will work the best for you. and But really let’s circle back to the very start when I talk about that bite-sized goal, because I think that’s an incredibly powerful insight and so important to not overwhelm yourself, not try to take on too much, not set yourself up for failure. Brad (30m 52s): So let’s say a tiny little goal of something that you want to improve. Maybe get out there and hit the deck. Like I recommend for the first five minutes of your day, or, you know, the yoga sun salute sequence of exercises. You can go on YouTube and search for a basic sun salute yoga sequence. And just to say that you’ll do those every single morning when you wake up, like probably over a billion people in the world do in the East, they do their Tai Chi sequences. As soon as they wake up. I remember when I was visiting Beijing for a triathlon years ago, I went out for a morning, jog out of my hotel and everywhere you look on the, on the sidewalk or on the steps or in the park, there’s people going through their Tai Chi sequences. Brad (31m 33s): And it was so beautiful and graceful and think about that’s how they start their day, every single day. Do something like that yourself. And if you only have five minutes to devote, cause I know a lot of people do have those hectic mornings. At least you can start something that’s doable and sustainable and build your momentum from there. Thank you for listening. Go out there and form some great habits. Thank you for listening to the show. I love sharing the experience with you and greatly appreciate your support please. Email podcast@bradventures.com with feedback, suggestions, and questions for the Q and A shows, subscribe to our email list to Brad kearns.com for a weekly blast about the published episodes and a wonderful bimonthly newsletter edition with informative articles and practical tips for all aspects of healthy living. Brad (32m 24s): You can also download several awesome free eBooks when you subscribe to the email list. And if you could go to the trouble to leave a five or five star review with Apple podcasts or wherever else, you listen to the shows that would be super awesome. It helps raise the profile of the be read podcast and attract new listeners. And did you know that you can share a show with a friend or loved one by just hitting a few buttons in your player and firing off a text message? My awesome podcast player called overcast allows you to actually record a soundbite excerpt from the episode you’re listening to and fire it off with a quick text message. Thank you so much for spreading the word and remember B.rad.

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All About Calories: The Truth About Fat Loss, Inspired By Herman Pontzer

(Breather) This could be the most important podcast you ever listen to when it comes to understanding the true dynamics behind losing excess body fat, especially breaking free from the flawed notions that underpin the fitness and diet industries. 

This show is inspired by my two recent shows with Dr. Herman Pontzer (#1 and #2), author of the new book, Burn: New Research Blows the Lid Off How We Really Burn Calories, Lose Weight, and Stay Healthy. This show aggregates the breakthrough insights about energy expenditure with what we know about calories to uncover, simplify, and demystify the truth about weight loss and caloric intake.

This episode completely challenges the foundational premise of the fitness industry as I reveal that you actually burn the same number of calories per day, regardless of exercise level and break down the constrained model of caloric expenditure. You’ll learn why the “additive model” of energy expenditure (which entails figuring out your BMR with a calculator and then adding and subtracting the calories consumed and burned throughout the day) can be highly inaccurate, which can be explained by the Compensation Theory (your vigorous workouts cause you to not only be lazier, but also eat more the rest of the day). 

You’ll also learn that homo sapiens’ genetics transcends the nuances of our daily lifestyles and training logs and that we are the highest calorie burners among the apes (and the best calorie storers): Gorilla’s burn 20% fewer calories than humans, and apes in zoos actually burn the same amount of calories as a heavily active ape in the wild. I also reveal that activity really burns only a tiny bit more calories: moderately active people burn 200 more calories a day than inactive people, and hugely active people burn around the same amount of calories as the moderately active people.

I also talk about what happens when you try to flaunt your Homo sapiens genes and burn calories like crazy in the name of fitness or weight loss, which can be best summed up by this quote: “Reproduction, growth, repair, and locomotion are a zero sum game.” This means that if you do more of one, you take away/borrow from one or more of the others. I explain why the consequences of that are no joke: you’re on the thin red line of suppressed immune function, suppressed cognitive function, suppressed general energy levels, delayed recovery, reduced reproductive drive, and reproductive fitness. I also mention that female extreme endurance amenorrhea is the most visible example of this, as sadly so many women become infertile all just to run more mileage.

One important point to take away from this episode: if you reject the constraints of the human and march forward with an unsustainable lifestyle, compensations will be taken for you. This brings to mind stories I’ve heard from amateur fitness enthusiasts who often pair 6 months (or 6 years) of heavy devotion to CrossFit, but need to take 6 months or 6 years off for recovery. Similarly, when you look at the Biggest Loser contestants 6 years after the show, they have dysregulated appetite and fat metabolism. The majority of them ended up gaining all the weight they lost back and then some, and I talk about how this happens frequently to bodybuilders as well. 

So how can this be? How is it that an ambitious exercise regimen will not help your fat loss at all? Dr. Herman explains: “Possibly an athlete is undergoing an initial adjustment to a higher level of training. And before they get used to it, the athlete is in a temporary unsustainable physique,” like prepping for the Tour de France. Or it could be that the athlete is also changing their diet as part of lifestyle improvement. 

But what is the deal? How and why do we gain fat so easily, and how can we actually lose it, long-term, and not as a temporary fix? While Dr. Herman admits that losing excess body fat is “tough,” the truth is that there is a high genetic component to body fat percentage, and a high lifestyle component to dysregulated eating and fat gain. This is why it’s so key to focus on cultivating healthy sleep and exercise habits. I bring up Dr. Herman’s point that it is possible that high or low daily energy expenditure is set early in life, just that we don’t know yet what the precise mechanism is. He’s also noted two groups that appear to have high expenditure: athletes and subsistence farmers. What do they have in common? They both tend to grow up moving a lot, as well as eating a lot.

Whether it’s your genes, your environment, or some combination, high energy expenditure in childhood may remain intact throughout life, but Dr. Herman says we don’t know for sure. Being predisposed to high energy flux may help some people respond quickly to workouts and have more success keeping their weight stable through exercise, while for some others no amount of exercise affects weight loss. 

If you want to try to figure out if exercise can help you easily lose weight and keep it off, ask yourself if you fit into one or more of the following categories:

1. You were extremely active as a kid, but are mostly sedentary now.

2. Until recently, you could eat what you wanted without gaining much weight, if any.

3. Like Mick DiMaria, you’ve spent most of your life in pretty good shape and only recently let yourself go.

If any of these ring true, there’s a good chance you’re high flux. That suggests your body prefers to eat a lot of food each day, and until recently you matched your appetite with a high activity level. And it suggests your body may respond quickly to structured workouts.

The Best Strategy to Lose Extra Body Fat

The best starting point of all is to simply ditch processed, nutrient deficient food in favor of high-satiety, nutrient dense foods (protein especially). Then the next step, which is taking an under the radar approach so you get a mild calorie deficit, without prompting compensation mechanisms. There are one of two ways to do this: you can implement a slight deficit each day or occasional extreme fasting (24 hours, 1 day a week). I personally like to trigger hunger now and then to increase my appreciation of food. And why not throw in a big fasting day? (This is what Mark Sisson does on days he’s flying.)

Dr. Herman says it accordingly, “Find a diet that leaves you completely satisfied with not in excess of calories. Pick a diet with rules, restrictions and guidelines so you are not prompted to overeat. Any diet is essentially a gimmick in the end. Cut carbs, cut fat, cut plants, intermittently fast, go compressed eating window, go vegan. Just implement rules and guidelines so you don’t have constant unfettered access to hyper palatable foods and overeating. Find a diet that leaves you satisfied and happy.” My latest book, Two Meals A Day, offers a simple but highly effective strategy: to simply implement new rules and a new norm to follow, instead of following the ridiculous 3 meals a day habit, which only came out of the industrial revolution. The carnivore diet is not only extremely high satiety and low insulin stimulating, but it also has great potential for fat loss. Fasting is another rule to implement to promote automatic success: a smaller eating window simply means less potential to overeat. It’s simple, smart, and most importantly, it works.

It can seem overwhelming trying to implement all the necessary parts of a healthy lifestyle, but when you break it down, it’s simple: emphasize sleep, reduce stress, don’t overtrain, and get rid of sugar, grains, and seed oils as these drive the overproduction of cortisol and dysregulate appetite and satiety hormones. Exercise and movement are obviously hugely important, as these prompt a reduction in systemic inflammation. Dr. Herman says research reveals that if you sit too much, your body becomes inflamed. Humans have a genetic requirement for near constant movement. 

The importance of checking your intentions can also not be discounted. Form a healthy body image, decide to turn things around, and reclaim your genetic potential. My colleague Amy Lucas says, “I’m sure I’ll never be fat, because I believe I’m a skinny person.”

You’ll also learn that major fluctuations in body weight can be mistaken for gaining and losing fat, but are almost entirely natural fluctuations in hydration, glycogen retention inflammation, and water retention in cells throughout the body make for most of your body weight variation. When we talk about body fat, we are best away from scale and tracking according to the fit of a tight pair of pants. And if you don’t believe me, watch Nick Symmonds lose 10lbs in 24 hours of mostly fasting, not much water, and a few hard workouts and hot sweaty workouts.

That’s a wrap for today, and good luck! One useful reminder is to ask yourself: How many times have I been hungry in the last 30 days, or 30 years? Pushing the boundary a bit of what you think of as hunger, as well as forming a set intention to change your body, can really help weight loss efforts. 

TIMESTAMPS:

This podcast shatters the basic elements of the modern fitness and diet industry. [01:40]

The truth is we humans burn around the same number of calories every day, regardless of our exercise level. [03:15]

How can it be that the lazy person next door burns the same calories as I, a gym goer, do? [10:21]

The brain burns most of our daily calories and then the other organs burning the rest independent from our activity level. [12:30]

When transitioning from the moderately active category to the incredibly active category, there is very little change in daily caloric energy expenditure. [14:00]

Muscle burns a bit more calories than fat. [16:59]

Calorie burning is happening, but we need to look at the compensation factor. When you are a hard driving athlete and burning lots of calories, you are spending less energy on your immune function, your reproductive function etc. [23:18]

Mark Sisson’s example is when he was running a hundred miles a week for seven years. He had many physical maladies which led him to become the Primal Blueprint guy. [26:55]

Burning the candle at both ends…burning more calories than you’re genetically adapted to could shorten lifespan. [32:25]

How can an ambitious exercise regimen not help fat loss at all? When you are super fit, you become super-efficient in burning calories. [33:48]

Your devotion to improving your fitness and working out inspires you to clean up your diet. [38:11]

So how does one lose excess body fat? Exercising more doesn’t really work, nor does prolonged caloric restriction. [42:38]

There are many cultural influences causing us to overeat. [50:04]

The best starting point is to ditch processed nutrient foods in favor of high satiety, nutrient dense foods. [52:12]

Pay attention to your hunger and satiety signals and notice when you’ve had enough. [58:21]

You can use almost any diet as long as it has rules and regulations that will keep you from overeating. [01:00:44]

Your exercise and lifestyle changes need to accompany the dietary transition. [01:05:14]

Gluttony and sloth are not the causes of obesity.  They are symptoms of obesity. [01:08:23]

Start with forming a healthy image and then decide to turn things around with positive energy rather than disgust and self-loathing and all these flimsy motivators that only work for a short time. [01:09:55]

Your weight on the scale naturally can vary from day to day. [01:11:25]

LINKS:

QUOTES:

  • “Reproduction, growth repair, and locomotion are a zero-sum gain.” (Dr. Herman Pontzer)
  • “If you want to live longer, lift more weights and eat more protein.” (Robb Wolf)

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B.Rad Podcast

Brad (1m 40s): It’s all about the calories people. Yes, this show could be the most important podcast you ever listened to when it comes to understanding the true dynamics behind losing excess body fat. So we are going to uncover simplify and demystify the truth about energy expenditure. This show is inspired by my two full length interviews with Dr. Herman Pontzer, evolutionary anthropologist and author of the breakthrough new book about caloric expenditure called Burn. So please listen to our two full length shows about all aspects of his life’s work, studying the energy expenditure of humans and other great apes in the family. Brad (2m 27s): And, Oh boy, it’s going to recalibrate so many super important things, including pretty much shattering the basic foundational elements of the modern fitness industry and diet industry. So what we’re talking about here is the recent science that’s strongly refuting what we have long thought to be the path to dropping excess body fat. And that is to burn more calories every day, by working out a lot, speed up your metabolism by building more lean muscle mass and all that great stuff. And in tandem, reduce your caloric intake by a significant margin to achieve these miracle results that we see glorified on TV, like the Biggest Loser, or see the before and after photos on the internet of people dropping 20, 30, 40 pounds. Brad (3m 15s): Okay. So here’s the breakthrough insight that Dr. Pontzer has shared so beautifully and convincingly with the research and the data that doesn’t lie as Dr. Herman likes to say. The truth is we humans, homo sapiens, burn around the same number of calories every day, regardless of our exercise level Hello, what are you talking about? Yup. There goes the foundational premise of the fitness industry that you can increase your metabolism or burn the fat away by slamming down another workout or a double workout if you’re really serious. Nope. Brad (3m 55s): In fact, we are constrained by evolutionary biology and the realization that homo sapiens burn calories in a very narrow and constrained range. It happens to be around 3000 calories a day adjusted for your lean body mass. So that’s the main adjustment factor as a little bitty, a hundred pound female personal trainer that you see bouncing around the gym is going to burn a certain amount of calories. And then a big, giant massive muscle bodybuilder is going to burn quite a bit more based on that lean body mass. But after we adjust for lean body mass, the only thing left are tiny little adjustments based on our activity level. Brad (4m 40s): And as Dr. Pontzer details in our interviews and in the book burn, the adjustments are shockingly small for whether you leave a sedentary couch potato life, taking the subway to the high rise, taking the elevator, sitting at a desk, taking the subway back home and watching Netflix all evening, versus whether you’re out there training for a marathon or peddling your bicycle for hours every day, or in the case of Dr. Pontzer landmark studies of the Hadza, our hunter-gatherer primitive living population in Tanzania, they burn the same number of calories as an office couch-potato shockingly. So even though they’re active all day long, they’re walking between three and seven miles a day. Brad (5m 22s): And this was his original study work started around a decade ago, where they went down to Tanzania expecting to find these guys burning way more calories than average humans. And that was when we turned the corner and realized that this is way bigger than our workout logs. This is more to the homo sapiens species. And we are, we happen to be the biggest calorie burner in the great ape family. And a lot of that is devoted to our massively a ravenous brain that burns 20% of all the daily calories that we burn. So that advanced brain function and all kinds of other reasons that we burn more calories than let’s say a gorilla. Brad (6m 4s): And this is vastly more significant than the blank goals and our training log or the huge big weeks of training that we do. Thinking that, yeah, this is increasing our daily caloric intake. So I’m going to get into it with great detail here. There’s going to be a lot thrown at you, a very comprehensive show I’ve prepared for you. And hopefully you’ll walk away feeling after processing all the information and shaking away your fixed and rigid beliefs. You’ll have a better understanding and a better focus on what it really takes to drop excess body fat. So hang until the latter parts of the show where we’re going to just cut the chase. Brad (6m 44s): But first you have to understand these amazing breakthrough insights that are shattering our notions of how the body works. And what I described that you burn around the same number of calories per day, regardless of whether you work out or not is called the constrained model of caloric expenditure. And this replaces the flawed conventional wisdom model that we’ve held for decades, which you could call the additive model of energy expenditure. And this is where we go on to the online cute little calculator. And we input our age and our height and our weight, and they spit out a basal metabolic rate. I’m sure you’ve heard that term BMR. And it says, this is how many calories you burn per day at rest. Brad (7m 25s): And then you can go and plug in the 600 calories that you burn at your spinning class or what your smartwatch told you. You just burned on your hike or your bike ride, and then add those two together. And that’s your calorie burn for the day, weigh and measure all your food, put it into an app, realize that you’re eating 400 calories less than you burned. And, Hm, well guess what? That calorie burning calculation could be highly inaccurate because what it fails to recognize the additive model of energy expenditure fails to recognize these adjustments and compensations that occur to normalize your daily caloric expenditure when you work out like crazy. Brad (8m 10s): So this is called the compensation theory. That your vigorous workout will cause you to being lazier and also to probably eat more food for the rest of the day. And this compensation happens both consciously and subconsciously. So a few set your alarm, wake up, get to the spinning class at 6:00 AM, pound the pedals, sweat like crazy while everyone else in your neighborhood’s asleep, you high five your person on the bike next to you. And then you go through the rest of the day with permission to take the elevator instead of the stairs. Permission to not get to that yard project quite just yet, maybe another day when you’ll move the sand bags over to the side yard and plant some more plants and do some general physical work. Brad (8m 55s): The compensations also happen beneath the surface on a subconscious level. So maybe just, maybe you’ll be reaching for an extra handful of nuts and snacks and treats and trail mix over the course of the day. Maybe you’ll go for that extra scoop of ice cream at nighttime kind of subconsciously, but just sounds good and looks good because of that workout that you did in the morning, you give yourself permission. So when we have these compensation factors in place, the compensation theory suggests that the net effect of your devoted workout regimen is essentially a wash when it comes to dropping excess body fat resting expenditure. Brad (9m 40s): This is Herman explaining it, Dr. Pontzer, this is a dynamic and moving target, your basal metabolic rate. It can’t be easily extracted from an online calculator. It’s a dynamic and moving target and it adjusts to make room for changes in physical activity to keep daily energy expenditure in the same ballpark, regardless of lifestyle. Now, I have to mention that this is a highly controversial point of view because of course it’s shattering the foundational elements of the diet and fitness industries, but Pontzer is a hardcore guy. Anyone who’s in the sciences and risen to the top of academia has to fight these battles. And so he says straight up, look, the data always wins. Brad (10m 22s): This is his life’s work: energy expenditure of humans and other apes. Eh, the 10 years of studying the Hadza combined with over a hundred great, highly validated studies from modern living citizens across the globe validate this idea that we burn around the same number of calories every day. So your next question is, of course, how the hell can this be? That my lazy ass neighbor next to me who sleeps in, he’s not even awake when I get home from spinning class. And then finally he emerges, walks 50 feet down the driveway. He gets the newspaper, maybe we’ll walk the dog. How the hell can he be burning the same number of calories as the bad-ass gym goer? Brad (11m 4s): Who’s also out there taking a pace walk with the friend in the evening and also foam rolling and fidgeting while watching Netflix instead of just laying there, sunken into the couch. So the first insight that made a lot of sense to me, that I pulled from the interviews with Pontzer is that homo sapiens genetics transcends these seemingly are relatively minor nuances of our daily lifestyle. Like I said, we’re the highest calorie burners among the apes. Gorillas burn 20% fewer calories than the human. And guess what a gorilla in the zoo, a chimpanzee or an ape burns the same number of calories as a much more active ape in the wild. Brad (11m 46s): So it’s more of our genetics rather than getting up and burning a hundred more calories, another 10 minutes of extra bike riding, extra credit after the workouts over. So how do we break this down? I give you a little tip there with the brain and the insight that the brain burns 20% of all daily calories, regardless of what we’re doing with it. Okay. So there’s a very, very surprisingly little variation between going to Hawaii on vacation, getting your lounge chair and gazing at the ocean for hours on vacation versus, for example, intense brain activity, like taking a lengthy professional exam where you’re sweating out every single question. Brad (12m 31s): And you’re in there in the exam room for the same six hours that you are on that lounge chair in Hawaii later that same month. Your brain does not change that much calorie burning. Herman said maybe it’s around four calories, extra per hour. And what does that equate to? An M and M, his favorite measure of caloric expenditure. So when you’re stressed and working on that deadline project in the office, and you’re really concentrating and your hands reaching for the M and M bowl over and over, think about that. One M per hour is the difference between that and vegging out. So we have the brain, who’s a voracious calorie burner with very little variation, and then we have the other organs and systems in the body that contribute to burning our total daily expenditure independent from our activity levels. Brad (13m 19s): For example, the gastrointestinal track burns around 15 to 20% of our daily calories. The liver, the control tower for all energy dispensation into the bloodstream in the body, again, burning around 15 to 20% of our total daily energy expenditure. The muscles, yes, the muscles are burning calories while you exercise, but it rests on the other 23 hours a day that you’re not working out. Those muscles are burning around 15 to 20% of your total daily energy expenditure as is the heart. The heart speeding all the time, I hope. So there’s another 15 to 20% that adds up to around a hundred percent of your basal metabolic rate. Okay, then we can talk about activity, right? Brad (14m 1s): So I don’t want to be that lazy ass neighbor guide described. I want to be the active, adventurous working out devotedly in the gym and getting up and moving instead of sitting doing a standup desk instead of a sit down desk, all this great stuff. Okay. Guess what? The moderately active human burns around 200 calories per day, more than the inactive human, which is surprisingly little, Oh my gosh, divide that 200 calories by 24 hours. Right? And it’s, it’s nothing it’s again, a couple of M & Ms difference between being a moderately active human and a couch potato. Here’s another big, shocking insight. What about when we go from moderately active to hugely active to the CrossFit gold star for attendance record or the marathon runner that’s putting in 30, 40, 50 miles a week. Brad (14m 51s): So when transitioned from the moderately active category to the incredibly active category, there is very little change in daily caloric energy expenditure. So we’re just taking that first bump up from being a couch potato to moderately or hugely active. And you’re only burning another 200 calories more per day. Ah, okay. What about that muscle mass burning more calories? So again, we’re making that adjustment compensation to the amount of mean body mass that you have regardless of your body fat percentage. So a lean mean 165 pound human in comparison to someone who’s 200 pounds, But has 165 pounds of lean body mass. Brad (15m 38s): Very little difference in energy expenditure. In fact, the heavier person might even burn more daily calories than the lighter person, because even fat requires energy burns has caloric expenditure every single day. So did you get that? We both have 165 pounds of lean body mass, but the 200 pound person with all that extra fat is burning not only around the same, but maybe more than the lean active athletic person. Okay. What about if you have two people that weigh the same amount, but one person’s lean and active and the other person is a much higher percentage body fat. Yes. There’s going to be more calories burned by the lean person. Brad (16m 18s): My dad was famous for maintaining his body weight throughout his entire life, but let’s say that he gradually lost a bit of muscle mass with each passing decade. So he’s still weighs 165 his whole life, but with less muscle mass, his calorie burning is going to go down. Okay. Here’s the thing about muscle mass. If you read the glitzy magazines or even listen to major authorities, popular voices like Dr. Oz, a best-selling author, Jorge Cruz, or the, a very popular book back in the nineties Body for Life. This edition of muscle mass was touted as the huge, magical secret to get lean drop that excess body fat and keep it off because your muscles are burning so many more calories than fat. Brad (16m 59s): This has been completely destroyed by emerging science. And the truth is the realization here is that muscle burns a little bit more calories than fat, but not much more a pound of muscle. And let’s say an inactive pound of muscle over the course of the day burns around six calories per day. A pound of fat like I said, the obese person is needing to burn more calories and a pound of fat burns around two calories per day. So we’re talking about, let’s say gaining 10 pounds of muscle and losing five pounds of fat, which in real life would be a dramatic physique transformation. Brad (17m 44s): Imagine how you would look if you put on 10 pounds of lean muscle mass and lost five pounds of fat. Oh yeah. You’re going to get those six pack coming out. You’re going to look different, feel great, look fantastic. But guess what? You’re only going to burn 60 additional calories per day with that new muscle mass. And you’re going to burn 10 calories fewer because you drop some of that spare tire, right? So the net is 50 K calories difference per day from a dramatic physique transformation that occurs in the gym. You may have heard about this highly lauded concept of “excess post exercise oxygen consumption” E P O C. Brad (18m 24s): And if you Google it and look for the most glitzy landing pages, people are talking about this as the wonderful, magical end all to drop excess body fat and get that six-pack glistening. Because if you do a workout for a half an hour, or guess what? Because of epoch EPOC, you’re going to burn more calories for hours and hours afterwards. But the truth is when it comes to your daily caloric expenditure, this concept of excess post-exercise oxygen consumption is insignificant to your total calorie burning. Okay? Huh? Maybe this isn’t flying with our long-held belief systems that if you go out there and train like crazy, you’re going to get lean and mean, right? Brad (19m 7s): I mean, I have, I had Dr. Pontzer with that pretty much exact question of back in my memory of extreme triathlon training you put in more hours of training and you get leaner and you get faster if doing it right. Of course. But if we’re talking about here, flaunting your homo sapiens genetics, and going out there and burning calories like crazy in the name of fitness or weight loss, what is going to actually happen to you? Here’s a fantastic quote that I would like you to remember for the rest of your life. Reproduction, growth repair and locomotion are a zero sum gain. Brad (19m 47s): Do you know what zero-sum gain means math students? That means it adds up to the same number, no matter what. So reproduction, growth, repair and locomotion are a zero sum gain. If you do more of one, let’s say locomotion, right? You’re training like crazy to get lean and mean and get fit. You’re going to take away. You’re going to borrow from the others. So if you’re in this crazy calorie burning mode, whether it’s from extreme exercise patterns, or let’s say running around like a harried soccer mom, where everything’s at full speed and you’re multitasking and you’re running into the house because you forgot something and dashing back into the car. Brad (20m 30s): And then when you get to the park for soccer practice, you’re going to jog a few laps around instead of just sit there and relax. And then you’re going to go onto your own workout. That’s later that day, you know, that kind of person I’m talking about. Okay. So if you’re a crazy calorie burning high energy, go, go, go type a person. You are going to be borrowing from these other critical human functions, reproduction, growth, and repair. So you’re going to be in the example of an extreme training athlete, such as myself, when I was a triathlete and training for hours and hours every day, burning, you know, tons of calories during those workouts, I was always treading on the thin line of suppressed immune function, suppress cognitive function, right? Brad (21m 12s): You get a little bit of brain fog when you’re burning too many physical calories and also is suppression of general energy levels during the day. So how, while I was on the bike or swimming or running for hours every single day, I didn’t burn very many calories in the rest of my life. I was asleep for 12 hours a day, as I often like to reminisce on the show that was 10 hours every night and a two hour nap every afternoon. So it was burning arguably significantly fewer calories outside of my workouts than someone who was following a more sensible training schedule. Furthermore, I was routinely and chronically suppressing immune function. Brad (21m 54s): I was challenging my body’s ability to grow and repair muscles, right? So it was always in kind of recovery mode. And of course on the reproduction side, it’s very common for high stress people, whether it’s extreme training athletes or people who are out of balance to have reduced reproductive drive, reduced libido and a diminishing reproductive fitness, the most extreme or graphic example. This is the very common occasion among female extreme and elite endurance athletes to have the cessation of menstruation. Amenorrhea is just hand in hand when the female gets super lean and is going for a national caliber times, or what have you. Brad (22m 37s): All the energy is devoted to running or training to the extent that they cease reproductive fitness. And this is kind of a hard one to swallow, but I can totally relate to it with my triathlon example because of all the ways that I conserved energy outside of the workouts, including reproduction, growth and repair. So my burn rate, going back to the science and how the data doesn’t lie was around the same as my buddies who had the same amount of lean body mass, but were studying hard in law school and hopefully getting out for a 30 minute jog between their medical school or law school or business school studies. Brad (23m 19s): Yeah. So this one is a hard hump to get over, to just shake your head and acknowledge that this tremendous devotion and attention that’s been a lifestyle strategy for you, the devotion to getting out there and burning calories during exercise in the name of maintaining a healthy weight or in the name of dropping excess body fat really doesn’t matter that much. At least it doesn’t matter directly. And we’re going to talk about the number of ways that it indirectly, but wow. Yeah, that’s a heavy one. So here’s a bunch of examples that might be swirling through your brain. And this list was compiled. When I woke up in the morning for days after my interviews with Dr. Brad (24m 1s): Pontzer thinking about all these counterexamples and trying to understand and come to terms with, with this wild paradigm shifting insight. How about the Tour de France riders? You might think, yeah, these guys are known to burn what six, seven, 8,000 calories a day. Don’t get me wrong. The calorie burning is happening. What we’re talking about out here with the science is the compensation factors. So indeed your watch or your device is correct that you just burned 600 calories during your 40 minutes spinning. When I worked for Spinning, we actually did research and, and tattered that research and write that a 40 minute class burns an exciting 650 calories or something like that. Brad (24m 43s): So that’s happening. We’re just talking about what’s happening when you get off the bike for the other 23 hours a day. And again, in comparison to that lazy ass neighbor who can barely get his dog out for a walk every day and doesn’t do nothing just sits around around, but guess what? Your vigorous workout, if you’re cranking for an hour, every single day, like a true devoted CrossFit enthusiast, those extreme high performing workouts, let’s say they’re going to burn 750 calories in an hour. That’s a lot of calorie burning. That’s a big person, but let’s use 750 for argument’s sake for a super awesome workout that you do let’s say five days a week. Brad (25m 23s): Well guess what if you divide that by 24 hours, that’s 31 extra calories per hour in comparison to your lazy ass neighbor. And I already mentioned the compensation factors where you might be moving a little more slowly and less apt to get up and do some yard work and burn regular every day, physical energy expenditure calories. Furthermore, we have those important compensation factors. So you’re going to spend less energy on your immune function, your reproductive function, your growth and repair of muscle tissue and all kinds of other things. So the Tour de France riders are basically walking zombies where their existence is completely devoted to burning those calories during the daily stage. Brad (26m 14s): And it’s completely unsustainable, which is why after the 25 day Tour de France, these guys are pretty much toast and they require a lot of downtime where very likely they’re eating a bunch of food, sleeping a lot, still exercising. And I know they have to go and continue to race and, and do all that, but they’re not doing a Tour de France style binge for more than a two, three times a year when they come to the grand tours and race a month. Furthermore, the elite athlete. Well, and an interesting example, we also have to acknowledge that they’re so incredibly fit that doing a five-hour bicycle race at high speed, doesn’t require a lot of caloric energy for them. Brad (26m 55s): It’s much easier for them to go and slam out a stage of the Tour de France than someone getting on their bike and riding the stage. You know, they have those guided tours in Europe where it’s either the day before or the day after you actually do the same stage of the Tour de France that you’re about to watch, or that just watch. It’s kind of a cool experience for a cycling enthusiast, but that’s going to require a lot more calories for someone who let’s say is racing 200 pounds up the Hill, rather than 139 pound Tyler Hamilton dancing on those pedals and getting the whole stage over with, remember in four hours and 25 minutes or something like that. Okay. How about Sisson’s example, where he talks about running a hundred miles a week week for seven years when he was training to be an elite marathoner and talking about all the health disturbances he had, which led him on his journey to being the, the Primal Blueprint guy. Brad (27m 50s): So he had impaired gut function, immune function that was trashed. He had recurring injuries that weren’t, you know, healing, right? He had things like arthritis in his hips and tendonitis in his ankles that pretty much ended his elite running career. So this was a sign that he was devoting excess energy to pounding the pavement and putting in those miles while the rest of his body was pretty much falling apart because it didn’t have the energy to repair. And boy, you can also see this in the amateur ranks where you’ll get a highly motivated goal oriented type person. I coached a lot of these people in the triathlon scene or they’d come to me, they’d say, here’s my schedule. Brad (28m 32s): I’m doing a couple of half iron mans this year. And next year I’m signed up for the big daddy of them, all the Ironman. And I want to train, train, train, and I want to do really well. And you’d see this period of life probably healthy too, that this was a temporary period of life that happened from ages 37 to 43. And then after that, that kind of like me. And when I put all those miles in and all those hours training, I shifted over to being a, super-duper a youth sports coach in soccer, basketball, and track with much less caloric output during the workouts, but a nice healthy phase of life to transition to something that wasn’t so extreme. And when it’s done poorly, when you go on these binges that are, I will advise, and you’re not prepared for them very well. Brad (29m 18s): We will often see someone who put in six months of heavy devotion to CrossFit requiring six months of extreme recovery, where they can’t even get into a basic fitness experience because they’re so tired, injured, broken down, whatever. Maybe it’s six years that they went hard, hard, hard as a competitive ultra running person or something. And then you’re going to see six years of recovery time, often taken on the back end. Speaking of six years. Oh my gosh, this is one of the most disturbing researches you’ll ever come across. Biggest loser contestants, six years after their appearance on the show and their binge experience of starvation paired with extreme exercise, six years later, they still showed signs of dysregulated appetite and fat metabolism. Brad (30m 8s): And the vast majority of them, almost all of them gained all the weight that they lost back. And then some, in many, many cases. So same thing in the bodybuilding scene. This is the, the best kept secret of the magazines you see on the shelves. And maybe the guy you see walking around at your gym, they’re known to kind of spin out of competition season with a major weight gain and complete exhaustion, to the extent that they’re just sitting around eating, instead of going to the gym for four, six, eight weeks after they got cut up to 3% body fat and flexed on stage, because it’s just so incredibly unsustainable. Brad (30m 48s): And as you probably know, there’s so many unhealthy aspects of cutting the weight and training to that extreme level. My favorite example came from my former podcast guest Wade Lightheart host of the BiOptimizers podcast and former competitive bodybuilder participating at the level of Mr. Universe, Mr. Olympia. And he says after his Mr. Olympia experience, he gained 42 pounds in 11 weeks because his digestive system, his overall health was just destroyed. He became bloated unhealthy. And that led him down to the path of becoming a nutrition expert, especially with probiotics and digestive enzymes that he sells at his BiOptimizers company, but he was just a mess and he couldn’t figure out why he was gaining so much weight in such a short time after his extreme binge of training and unhealthy eating habits. Brad (31m 46s): So yes, it’s possible. And these compensations occur if you tempt your homo sapiens genes and try to live in an unsustainable manner. So most everything I’ve talked about is strongly validated by science and my shows from Dr Pontzer. But one thing that I kind of put in as an aside in which we don’t know enough yet, but if you live this lifestyle of burning the candle at both ends, let’s say I’m sustaining my triathlon training patterns that only lasted for nine years, but I’ve been doing it for 40 years. It’s possible that that burning the candle on both ends and burning more calories than you’re genetically adapted to, to thrive and be healthy from, could shorten lifespan. Brad (32m 26s): That’s what I think anyway. So back to the list of insights and examples, you might’ve heard Mark Sisson on his second appearance on the Joe Rogan podcast here in 2021. And they talked about all kinds of interesting topics. One of the things that came up was this research showing that chess masters burn around 6,000 calories per day, when they’re in tournament mode. And it was thought to be that their brain function is so intense during those chess masters matches that it upregulated and burn way more calories than the person sitting on the beach in Hawaii. But this is actually not true. It’s what was happening during these intense chess match experiences. Brad (33m 7s): As all other kinds of metabolic and hormonal systems are put on high alert, high calorie burning due to the massive stress involved with competing at that level. So throughout the day, they’re experiencing increased heart rate respiration, their endocrine function, their stress hormone production is off the charts. And that’s why they’re burning 6,000 calories per day. And again, this is highly unsustainable in the same refrain as Tour de France cyclist. So the chess master might’ve burned a ton of calories that day, but they’re not competing in a high stress high calorie burning a chess tournament day after day after day. Okay. I know, I know you’re still trying to get your head around it. Brad (33m 49s): How the heck can this be? How can an ambitious exercise regimen not help fat loss at all? At least directly a lot of indirect benefits coming up. So I talked about that CrossFit king or queen burning an extra averaged out only 31 calories per hour. And guess what, you know, the lazy neighbor we’re making fun of. They’re going to catch up to the CrossFit king or queen and that extra 31 calories per hour divided by 24 that you burn at the CrossFit workout. They’re going to catch up because they’re less fit. So walking that dog around the block is a nice calorie burning experience for an unfit person or climbing two flights of stairs. They’re going to be winded at the top. Brad (34m 31s): They’re going to have that excess post-exercise oxygen consumption. Unlike a super-fit person, who’s going to float up two flights of stairs and burn far fewer calories. Same with going shopping at the grocery store, whatever basic level of activity you’re doing. When you’re super fit, you become super efficient. Same with the Tour de France bike rider, riding, you know, what they do on their off days, their, their off days from the tour. There’s a couple off days. They actually have to pedal the bicycle for two and a half hours to keep the blood flowing in the legs. Otherwise they will feel flat and beaten up when they get back on the bike. So that’s their off day. They’re still peddling, but that easy two and a half hour ride is nothing to them. Brad (35m 13s): And very few calories are burned. Relatively fewer calories are burned versus someone imagining riding a bicycle for two and a half hours. Okay. So when an athlete works out and works out more and works out more and gets nice and lean and gets all the compliments from their training partners, here’s, what’s happening explained by Dr. Pontzer. Quote, possibly the athlete is undergoing an initial adjustment to a higher level of training. And before they get used to it, yes, they’re going to be shedding some body fat burning, some extra calories, and then the body will adapt and it will become normalized. That’s one idea. The other one is in is that the athlete is in a temporarily unsustainable physic ala the Tour de France rider. Brad (35m 57s): So the tour guys, they make a devoted practice of dropping two, three, four, or five extra pounds in the month of June to get on the starting line as lean as possible because body weight is such a huge, important factor when it comes to the mountain climbing. So if you drop a low that’s 2.2 pounds of body weight, your performance on a sustained climb is going to mean the difference between staying with the pack and getting dropped, or the difference between the yellow jersey and getting fourth or fifth place, and who remembers who’s fourth or fifth place? Oh, man, these Tour de France writers have it down to such a fascinating science. You can read more in Daniel Coyle’s book The Secret RaceT but they can pretty much determine who’s going to win the tour de France in the training period, leading up to the Tour de France and specifically they’re identifying the amount of wattage. Brad (36m 50s): A rider can deliver per kilogram of body weight at anaerobic threshold. So you can prick your finger and get a blood sample on the fly. When you’re out there in the field and determine that you’re working at anaerobic threshold, then you can identify it and also in a laboratory and use your heart rate. So you’ll have a cyclist in training, going out and climbing a hill at 173 heartbeat climbing a mountain. Let’s say it’s a seven mile climb that’s going to last a half an hour or something. So they’ll go up that will at anaerobic threshold and notice their wattage output on the wattage meter on the bike, and then make a calculation according to their body weight. Brad (37m 32s): And the higher that number is I believe it was something like if you’re a 7.0, you’re going to win the tour. If you’re a 6.8, you’re going to be a top contender. If you’re 6.3 or below, and I might not be exactly accurate with the numbers, but you can get my point here. You know, that you’re going to get dropped on the big climb in the Tour de France. So pretty fantastic how science has come into the, the endurance sports world. And of course, doping is another factor that will help you put more watts out at a certain body weight. But putting that aside for a moment, just being able to pinpoint that pretty fascinating, but back to our discussion about why the heck does exercise not contribute to a body fat reduction? Brad (38m 12s): Those were the factors that Dr Pontzer was mentioning first athlete undergoing an initial adjustment, dropping some fat, getting used to the training load, and then normalizing, in fact, even possibly gaining some weight back to get back to that set point or in a temporarily unsustainable physique for the Tour de France, or interestingly here, if you’re that workout person or you see that person who’s working out more and getting lean, this is also attributed to the athlete. Changing their diet as part of an overall lifestyle improvement. So your increased devotion to fitness and working out has also inspired you to clean up your diet. Brad (38m 55s): Okay. Then I asked Dr. Pontzer about these outlier examples that don’t fit with the formula. For example, athletes who work out a lot and eat a lot of food. And I’m thinking of my son who is, you know, trying to pack on extra body mass. He’s been doing so for several years now, you know, college age or out of college age, but has been putting on 40 pounds of lean body mass in the last four years, let’s say so quite a, an unusual example in the massive adult population here. But why isn’t he getting fat if he’s burning the same amount of calories every day? So the first thing is when you’re putting on all that lean body mass, you are indeed burning more calories. Brad (39m 38s): And secondly, if you’re a big workout person and consuming extra protein to support that muscle growth, that hypertrophy and also good recovery from challenging workouts, a protein in particular has a very significant thermic effect. That means that around 25% of all the protein calories you consume go toward digesting the protein. Okay. So if you do four scoops of protein into your smoothie, that last scoop is totally devoted to digesting the other three scoops. And so it’s not as many calories as you think because of that thermic effect of food Pontzer says that 20% of all the calories that you eat have a thermic effect. Brad (40m 25s): In other words, just like the brain burning 20%, 20% of all calories, the food you eat requires 20% of the calories to digest the food. Other sources go a little lower saying that a protein has a thermic effect of 25% and fat and carbs have a thermic effect of only 8%. But if we get in there somewhere up to around 20%, now it’s starting to make sense that regardless of whether we work out or not, there’s a lot of energy going toward working that brain and digesting protein as well as the other macronutrients. So this is kind of reminded me of Robb Wolf’s wonderful quote, when he said, if you want to live longer, lift more weights and eat more protein. Brad (41m 9s): So that goal of maintaining sufficient muscle mass, especially as you age, is extremely huge, and it has all kinds of health ramifications to it. So we’re trying to maintain lean muscle mass. And that means eating sufficient protein, maybe even a little extra protein, knowing that the thermic effect of protein is going to be unlike less likely to have you packing on extra body fat. Okay. So I mentioned my son, the calorie eating machine, who’s working out eating a meal, cleaning up the meal, and then starting to make a second meal. No joke. Oftentimes what about someone who’s got a heavy manual labor job works in construction all day and also loves to do triathlons in his spare time versus the guy in the wonderful suit. Brad (41m 52s): That’s hanging out on the subway, the elevator, the high rise office, and then back to an evening of Netflix. Okay. Well guess what? That person’s going to burn several hundred additional calories per day than the completely sedentary person again, let’s say these guys have the same amount of lean body mass overall. So we’re not going to make any further adjustments, but we also can conjecture that the extreme active person is taking away from reproduction, repair and growth. Okay. So now that we understand the compensation theory, the constrained model of caloric expenditure would be the official title of this idea that we burn around the same number of calories per day. Brad (42m 39s): How the heck are we going to drop excess body fat then if it’s not about cranking up the spin bike? Oh, okay. What about crash dieting? Well, here’s what happens if you severely restrict calories for a prolonged period of time, the survival instincts kick in that we’re so familiar with, you’ve heard this as why diets don’t work is your body goes into survival mode. It’s absolutely true. And what happens is over time, your body is going to adjust to a new normal level of caloric intake. So we have this data on burning a certain number of calories as homo sapiens, but homo sapiens who starved themselves strategically starved themselves, right? Brad (43m 23s): With a long-term calorie restriction diet are going to burn fewer calories than their normal expected genetic baseline. And your body finds all kinds of different, clever ways to down regulate and adjust to the new normal. By being less generally active down-regulating important metabolic functions, reproduction, repair, growth, and locomotion. So you’re going to just tone down all four of those, including your desire to locomote to work out. You’re going to be too lazy, too tired to work out. And if you do work out, you’re going to have crappy workouts. I’ve had Elle Russ on the podcast before, and of course she’s hosting all the Primal Blueprint shows and talking about her experience. That’s detailed in her book, Paleo Thyroid Solution, where she was killing it. Brad (44m 7s): She was checking off all the boxes. She was living this wonderful paleo lifestyle, cutting out all those nasty carbs and eating really cleanly, doing hot yoga several days a week, going for long hikes, swimming every morning. And what was happening was her body was not getting sufficient nutrition. And so her thyroid was putting on the brakes. And this is when she went into tailspin of poor health driven by the well-meaning well-intentioned desire to be super active and not eat an excessive calories. So exercising more doesn’t really work nor does a prolonged caloric restriction. Brad (44m 49s): So how are we going to do this? Let’s ask Dr. Pontzer. I love his quote here about losing excess body fat. And he says, quote, it’s tough, especially as you get older. I said, I don’t see a book deal there, man. I don’t see an angle. He’s like, yep, that’s right. It’s really, really tough. And there’s also research showing that there is a high genetic component to the percentage of body fat that you’re currently carrying. There’s also a high lifestyle component to dysregulated eating and gaining excess body fat. So that’s where we can focus on all kinds of parameters, like getting sufficient sleep. Brad (45m 33s): All the research is showing that sleep deprivation even minor or short-term sleep deprivation triggers an increase in insulin resistance. So you’re going to be less adept at burning body fat and probably experience increase in appetite increased co-work intake. If you skimp on sleep, same with, if you don’t get enough general everyday movement. So if you’re sitting around and you have a noticeable increase in insulin resistance, decrease in glucose tolerance in as little as 20 minutes. So you start getting worse at burning fat and your cognitive function goes down. And generally that’s going to trigger an increase in appetite, especially for quick energy carbohydrates. So if you’re not moving much not sleeping well or over exercising, these are going to cause appetite, dysregulation, excess overeating and gaining excess body fat. Brad (46m 23s): We also have those hyper palatable foods, which are such a big problem because they hijack the dopamine reward pathways in the brain and stimulate us, trigger us to overeat. Check out Dr. William Davis bestselling book Wheat Belly, where he talks about the addictive properties of the modern day, gliadin protein contained in the modern day wheat product. And this gliadin stuff hits the opioid receptors in the brain and has the addictive property that prompts us to consume an additional 300 calories of food per day, because we have wheat in our diet. Trip out on that. And of course the addictive properties of sugar and the penchant for consuming a little sugar and wanting more is very well known and very validated by the great work of people like Dr. Brad (47m 12s): Gary Taubes, Dr. Robert Lustig. So we have these addictive foods and these dysfunctional lifestyle patterns that we can blame for the human pension to add excess body fat throughout the adult life. So here’s an interesting concept. It’s called “energy flux.” And this is believed to have genetic influences as well as childhood rearing influences. So it’s both your genetics and how you were raised. Whew! There’s a great article on men’s health. And it’s kind of identifying that we have these categories of whether you’re a, a high energy flux person, a high calorie burner, or a low calorie burner just by nature. Brad (47m 53s): Here’s a quote from the article, Dr. <inaudible> thinks that the human body seeks a preferred energy flux rather than a preferred body weight. Indeed studies of identical twins have shown that they typically have the same energy flux even when their body weights and activity levels differ. So the identical twins, the same genetics, right? They’re either high calorie, burners, or low calorie burners, the higher body mass of the less active twin. So let’s imagine two identical twins separated at birth. One guy got fat and lazy. The other guy’s an athlete, but the higher body mass of the less active twin allows him to burn the same number of calories as his lighter sibling. Brad (48m 34s): Who’s also fitter. In our example, Dr. Pontzer who was quoted in the article, he says, it’s possible that high or low daily energy expenditure is set early in life. Whether we have an active childhood or an indoor childhood playing with screens all day. We still don’t know the precise mechanism, but he’s noted two groups that appear to have a preponderance of high energy flux people, high energy expenditure type people. And those would be athletes and subsistence farmers. So they have a long history of moving around a lot and burning a lot of calories and eating a lot of food. So whether I’m still quoting from the article, whether it’s genes, environment, or some combination, high energy expenditure in childhood may remain intact throughout life. Brad (49m 20s): But Dr. Pontzer says, we don’t know for sure being predisposed to high energy flux may help. Some people respond quickly to workouts and have more success, keeping their weight stable through exercise. Well, for some others, no amount of exercise affects weight loss. To gauge if exercise would help you easily lose weight and keep it off, ask yourself if you fit into one or more of these categories. So we’re kind of tracking to see if you are a high energy flux person or a low energy flux person. Question number one, you were extremely active as a kid, but are mostly sedentary now. Question number two, until recently you could eat whatever you wanted without gaining much weight If any. Brad (50m 5s): And question number three, you’ve spent most of your life in pretty good shape and only recently let yourself go. If any of these ring true, there’s a good chance you’re in high energy flux. This suggests that your body prefers to eat a lot of food each day. And until recently you matched your appetite with a high activity level, and it suggests that your body may respond quickly to structured workouts. So get back out there if you’re a kind of lost yourself in recent years. Okay? So that’s the end of the insights about the energy flux article and let’s get back and zero in on this plan of how we lose excess body fat. I talked about how we gain the excess body fat. Brad (50m 47s): So now we talk about how to lose it, which Dr. Pontzer says is tough. And you know why it’s tough. It’s mainly because we have a whole bunch of modern genetic disconnects that we’ve blasted ourselves with in everyday life. Like the hyper palatable foods. I mentioned my brother, Oh, look, my son and my brother both get plugged on the show. Thank you for doing the transcription notes. So my mom gets a plug there too. How about that? But my brother came to me. So he gets, he gets her repeated on the podcasts for, for eternity when he said, yeah, I have a problem. I eat so healthy. Everything’s really doing clean. We’re making good meals, but every night around 11, I just have to have a bowl of cereal. And I just can’t, I can’t stand it. Brad (51m 28s): I wish I could cut it out. What do you think? Do you have any ideas? And I said, yeah, I can guarantee that will never happen again. Just go to bed at 10 30. Okay. So there’s the cereal at 11 example. We talked about the foods that were, that are thrown in our face all day long and all night, everywhere we go, the cultural traditions around eating and having lavish desserts, and then having some more and having to go to the movies and buy something in line. Before you sit and watch a movie, you got to have something in your hand, all of those kinds of cultural influences that are prompting us to overeat, and especially this concept of these modern foods that hijack the dopamine reward pathways is super interesting. Brad (52m 12s): And I think one of the biggest factors in the gaining of excess body fat difficulty dropping excess body fat. So check out Robb Wolf’s book Wired to Eat for more details. And Dr. Stephan Guyanete book, Hungry Brain talking about how these foods that combine typically the combination of sugar, fat and salt are what hijack these reward pathways in the brain, because these foods are completely non-existent in nature and over the course of evolutionary biology. So the great study of the Hadza that Dr Pontzer has done, and you might’ve heard content from Paul Saladino, Anthony Gustin went down there and spent some time with the Hadza, and yes, they will find a beehive and they will raid that puppy and binge on the honey. Brad (52m 57s): But it’s not typically at the same time, the same meal as when they get fresh kill from their hunting success. So when we pair these sweets and treats and lavish foods, and we can talk about all the dessert category, ice cream essentially is the pairing of sugar and fat. Cheese cake, potato chips, a baked potato with butter, even a bowl of pasta, right? With a meat sauce or the protein and some fat sources with all those carbohydrates. Those are the things that dysregulate our appetite. And again, we’re going against our genetics because we are genetically adapted our survival as a species has depended upon binge eating and storing excess body fat to get ready for the harsh cold winters. Brad (53m 41s): We did it every single year. Most humans on the planet, right? We’re really good at storing fat and then saving it for later use. So perhaps the best starting point of all, if you have an ambition to drop excess body fat is to ditch processed nutrient deficient foods in favor of high satiety, nutrient dense foods, especially protein, because it has that tremendous thermic effect where you’re going to be highly satiated. When you have a high protein meal, let’s say some, some scrambled eggs and steak and an avocado on top, and you’re going to eat this thing and you’re going to be full. You’re not going to overeat a second pan of scrambled eggs and steak and avocado much less likely than you would be to overeat with ice cream, cheesecake, whatever sweets and treats you’re doing. Brad (54m 31s): So getting rid of those nutrient deficient foods is the very sensible and powerful first step in the direction of succeeding with dropping excess body fat. Hey, what about these great dietary popular trends of recent times, Primal, Paleo, low carb, keto, carnivore? Pontzer points out that any diet will be successful if it’s restrictive, right? Same with all the intermittent fasting and the protocols. And it looks like two meals a day has good timing and good central premise because we’re capitalizing on all these new insights to make it simple and realize that, Hey, look, if you just kind of look at your lifestyle as a two meals a day maximum without snacking, that’s gonna put you in a winning position because you’re putting some restrictions. Brad (55m 17s): You’re putting the brakes on this constant access to hyper palatable foods. And of course, in the book, our first step, the right out of the gate, I believe there’s even a quip in there that if you can’t handle this, then you might as well just close the book and move on with your life. But that is to ditch the big three toxic modern foods. And those would be refined grains, sugars, and industrial seed oils. So back to the question of these specialized diets, like low carb keto, and this very popular carbohydrate insulin model of obesity, we’ll call it. And this is the premise advanced by leaders in the movement like Dr. Brad (55m 59s): Jason Fung, author of the obesity code, Gary Taubes, author of Good Calories, Bad Calories, why we get fat and the case against sugar. So these guys have done tons of research and promoted this carbohydrate insulin model of obesity. The Dr. Pontzer not necessarily directly refutes, but he’s not a hundred percent on board that this is the end all. So we’re kind of talking about how this carbohydrate insulin model of obesity does not transcend the simple insight that we are constrained with daily calorie burning. So that’s as polite as a big time people can strongly disagree where Pontzer saying that you can’t extract an idea like that, that flies in the face of evolutionary biology. Brad (56m 45s): So he’s standing on his position that we’re constrained by calorie burning where the, the carb insulin, model of obesity is implying that it’s the carbohydrates themselves that are causing the insulin spike that’s causing the excess body fat. Dr. Jason Fung says that 95% of your success or failure with fat reduction goals depends on your ability to control insulin in the diet. And Dr. Pontzer says that 100% of your success or failure to lose excess body fat comes from the amount of calories you eat. So I think the reconciliation here is that if you are consuming a lot of carbs, spiking insulin frequently, you’re going to have an increase in appetite, and you’re going to consume more calories, especially carbohydrates if you’re on that carbohydrate insulin rollercoaster. Brad (57m 38s): So, so we can embrace the idea that it’s all about calories consumed, and then go looking at ways to optimize appetite, optimize lifestyle patterns so that we, as Dr Pontzer says, find a diet that you enjoy and leaves you satisfied without eating excess calories. And that’s the secret to maintaining a healthy body weight, or dropping a few excess pounds, if that’s your goal. And we’re going to finish off the show with some tips and tricks to do just that. So it appears to be, remember that we can’t starve ourselves, or we’ll do all these compensatory mechanisms. And we cannot out exercise our homo sapiens genetics and our constraint model of energy expenditure. Brad (58m 21s): So it appears that the strategy to drop the excess body fat is to implement an under the radar approach. So you obtain a mild calorie deficit without prompting these compensatory mechanisms and without disturbing reproduction, repair and growth. So there appears to be two basic ways to achieve this, right? One would be to, to achieve a slight calorie deficit each day, or perhaps once in a while, engage in an extreme calorie deficit, such as a 24 hour fasting period one day a week, or something like that, where you’re going to burn a lot of fat calories that day to get your get through the day because you didn’t eat, but then you’re going to recalibrate and return to a normal eating pattern. Brad (59m 10s): And yes, it’s almost impossible to identify or pinpoint that you’re eating in a slight calorie deficit on each day or most days. So it’s mainly a matter of being more mindful, more intentional, and making an effort to eat less food than you normally do, or to pay more attention to your hunger and satiety signals and realize that yes, you’ve had enough, you’re satisfied and you can push the plate away rather than all these emotional and reflexive behaviors that we have toward eating where we’re eating way more than we need or reaching for those hyper palatable foods. Personally, I’ve found it useful to trigger sensations of hunger now, and then just to remind myself that I’m a human and increase my appreciation of food that I do eat, and also hone my fat burning capabilities. Brad (59m 58s): And I’ve talked about how cold exposure facilitates that because when you get your body cold, whether it’s going in the chest freezer or going for a swim in Lake Tahoe, your body has to work hard to rewarm and return the body to homeostasis afterward. And that extra caloric expenditure triggers an increase in appetite. And when you ignore that increase in appetite, you’re going to turbocharge accelerated fat burning. And then when it is time to eat, Oh boy, you really enjoy the meal because you’ve worked through a minor sensation of hunger now and then. Of course, people can overdo it here and get into that crash diet category where all kinds of bad things can happen. So it’s really thinking about that concept. I just came up with that term under the radar, because it, it’s a nice way to approach this, where you don’t have all this pressure on you. Brad (1h 0m 45s): You’re not feeling stressed that you missed a day of exercise, and now your fat reduction goals are going to be compromised. It’s none of that. It’s just a matter of having a greater appreciation for the natural hunger and satiety signals of the human and not being a modern day, unbridled, undisciplined pig who’s always around food and can eat as much as they want without even making any effort besides clicking a button and having Door Dash come to your door. So you can pick virtually any diet that has rules, restrictions, and guidelines that will not prompt you to overeat. Any diet is essentially a gimmick. In the end, you can cut carbs, you can cut fat, you can cut out plants like the carnivore movement. Brad (1h 1m 28s): You can get into intermittent fasting. You can go with a compressed eating window. You can be a vegan, but if you have these rules and guidelines in place, you won’t have constant unfettered access to hyper palatable foods and potential for overeating. That said, after blasting you with all these different, different options, keep in mind that is something like a vegan pattern should be described as extremely risky because you’re cutting out the majority of the most nutrient dense foods on earth. You also want something that’s going to be sustainable. So if you’re getting sick of keto after two weeks, because you feel better when you consume sweet potatoes and other sources of carbohydrates or whatever the case is, you don’t like to eat a certain foods that are a centerpiece of a certain diet, You’re going to have to find something that works for you. Brad (1h 2m 22s): That’s sustainable and leaves you satisfied without the need to overeat. And that’s why low carb primal paleo keto has become so popular, particularly keto because that’s taking it to the extreme, right? But if you limit your carbohydrate intake to 50 grams per day or less, you are going to produce a minimal amount of insulin. You’re going to rarely be hungry. And if you do it right, and choose a really nutritious foods as the centerpiece of your ketogenic experience, you’re going to be highly satisfied. But we’re going to broaden the lens a little bit from these popular diets and strategies of the day to realize when it comes to the context of losing excess body fat, that anything or a variety of things can work. Brad (1h 3m 8s): That’s why my next book is going to be titled the CNC diet that’s right, carnivores and chocolate, because I feel the carnivore diet has a lot to offer. It’s extremely high satiety. It’s low insulin stimulating. It has a tremendous nutrient density. You can go look for the carnivores scores chart@bradkearns.com. And we ranked the various categories of the most nutritious foods on earth in the carnivores spirit. So a carnivore-ish diet that provides sufficient carbohydrates for your athletic performance and recovery needs in many cases, including mine. So it’s not super strict because that would be too few carbohydrates for my preference. And the chocolate comes in there because it’s one of my favorite foods. Brad (1h 3m 49s): It’s got a lot of nutritional benefits and that arguably is as good as any other diet when it comes to dropping excess body fat. Because all we’re talking about is regulating your caloric intake and feeling happy and satisfied. Fasting is also super fantastic strategy, because again, it’s another rule. Maybe it’s a gimmick. You can call it that if you want. But when I made the rule to not consume any food until 12 noon, go listen to the fatty popcorn by boys’ saga for details. There wasn’t any magic to it. It was just putting some rules and restrictions on me so that I didn’t have unregulated and unfettered access to all the food that I wanted all the time, every single day. Brad (1h 4m 33s): So a smaller eating window arguably gives you less potential to overeat, less likelihood to overeat. But again, you can certainly get the job done by overstepping yourself, even if you’re eating in a compressed eating window. So all of these things can be really helpful because they tighten up this, this free for all modern world, where we have a tendency to overeat. And then that’s where the lifestyle factors come in. So just as I try to wrap up this show, bullet number one is pick a diet, probably with rules, restrictions, and guidelines, to help you and guide you toward a high state tidy diet that doesn’t prompt you to overeat. Brad (1h 5m 15s): Then we have to get the lifestyle habits nailed because these have a tremendous influence on our appetite hormones and our state tidy hormones. So we want to get a sufficient sleep. We want to have good stress management. I want to absolutely positively avoid any whiff of over-training because when you’re in a pattern of exhausting depleting workouts, you are going to prompt extreme appetite spikes to replenish yourself due to this overly stressful unsustainable lifestyle pattern, not just to replenish and get back to normal, but most likely to overeat because you’re most likely be having access to food for more hours than you’re exercising, right? So even if you go out there and do a killer two hour run, Epic run in the mountains, you’re going to be home for the next eight with access to food. Brad (1h 6m 4s): And you’re going to overeat if the workouts are too stressful. So we want to nail those, those primal principles that we’ve talked about for so long, where you’re doing plenty of low level movement and aerobic pace for your cardiovascular exercise, rather than exceeding that maximum aerobic heart rate. And then also getting in the brief explosive sessions that have a lot of wonderful metabolic benefits, including turbocharging fat burning. Again, this is assuming that you’re eating a sensible diet rather than stuffing your face, just because you went to the track and did a sprint workout. So we want to become a fat burning beast in all ways, in all areas of life, especially managing the stress response, because when you’re producing a lot of cortisol, such as staying up late, looking at a screen, you’re going to want to reach for that cereal bowl. Brad (1h 6m 53s): So the stress hormone spike is directly associated with a dysregulation of appetite and satiety hormones and living a balanced, relaxed, chilled lifestyle, where you enjoy meals. You eat at a sensible pace. You’re not chewing your food too quickly. You’re not watching TV while you’re eating all these things are going to contribute to a sensible caloric intake. And in the case of trying to drop a few pounds of excess body fat, they’re going to contribute to that because you’re going to notice these satiety signals more likely than if you’re watching a freaking basketball game while you’re stuffing your face with food. Another wonderful benefit of exercise and increase general everyday movement is that these prompt a reduction in systemic inflammation. Brad (1h 7m 33s): And Dr. Pontzer talked about some good research on our second show. If you sit around too much in general, everyday life, we know this from many, many articles sitting is the new smoking. You can Google that and see all these dangers of inactivity, but your body becomes inflamed. The, the human, the homo sapiens simply is compelled to move around a lot throughout the day and go and look at the Hadza and their behavior and their movement patterns to inform how we have lived for millions of years until only recently. So if you sit around too much, this is a unhealthy practice that causes systemic inflammation in the body. Now, when you have this state of chronic inflammation, this is going to cause overproduction of stress hormones, appetite, dysregulation, hunger spikes, and of course, eventually overeating and excess fat. Brad (1h 8m 23s): And like this quote from Gary Taubes book, where he says gluttony and sloth are not the causes of obesity. They are the symptoms of obesity. When you become obese, when you have metabolic damage, you are too tired to exercise and you’re hungry all the time. The symptoms of obesity are gluttony and Sloss. Okay. Also, exercise is wonderful to help reduce your stress reactivity to all other forms of stress in hectic high stress, fast paced, modern life. So you can probably envision or maybe think of yourself on a bad day where you’re running around and agitated, harried, hectic full of dysregulated energy. Brad (1h 9m 9s): And this also prompts systemic inflammation, this spike of stress hormones, or the chronic overproduction of stress hormones in the case of a constantly harried human. And that’s going to bring in appetite dysregulation, excess hunger, excess eating, excess body fat. Chill people know how to fast. They eat sensible meals, they enjoy themselves, and they just tone down this hyper the stress reactivity problem in modern life. And I’m going to throw one more bullet in here inspired by Dave Rossi. Who’s very interested in the topic of weight loss. He’s the spiritual guru. That’s been on the show three times and we’ll call it intention. Kind of a wild card here. Cause it’s outside of the mechanics of the science and the insights from Dr Pontzer. Brad (1h 9m 56s): But Rossi talks about this a lot, where if you form a healthy image of yourself and your body, and you have some gratitude for wherever you are today, even if you will acknowledge that you’re not at your, at your best weight or whatever it is, or your best fitness level, start with gratitude. Start with forming a healthy image and then decide to turn things around with positive energy rather than disgust and self-loathing and all these flimsy motivators that only work for a short time. And this will help you reclaim your genetic potential. So you form an intention. I am going to drop a few pounds of excess body fat. Brad (1h 10m 36s): I deserve it. I feel great about myself now. And I’m so happy that I’m not suffering in the hospital and dying of a global pandemic, whatever you want to do to form a positive intention. And then you start from that point. My primal colleague for a long time, Amy Lucas, actress writer in Hollywood, and she made this memorable qAuip. We were just having a meal in a restaurant and I’ll never forget it. She said, you know what? I’m sure that I’m never going to be fat because I believe that I’m a skinny person, a slender person. I have the identity of a slender person. And if anything interferes with that self image, I will automatically correct course without even, without even realizing it and quote, and that’s a pretty heavy quote. Brad (1h 11m 25s): You get the difference between someone who’s had a long battle with self-loathing and negativity and whatever other emotional disturbances that have led to dysregulated eating yo-yo dieting and all this crazy stuff. Okay. One other thing to note, when we’re talking about dropping excess body fat, we have to understand the difference between moving your body weight, changing your body weight, and actually reducing excess body fat, getting a lower percentage of body fat, because we have a surprising ability to fluctuate our body weight on a day-to-day basis. And this is often mistaken for gaining and losing fat, but instead, what it is is almost entirely natural fluctuations in hydration, glycogen, retention, inflammation, and water retention in the cells throughout the body. Brad (1h 12m 15s): And these are what cause our body weight to vary routinely five pounds in a single day. So when you haven’t exercise much and been on a nice cruise and went to the buffet and stuffed your face and came back a week later, and it shows that you gained seven pounds, it’s possible that you gained maybe one pound of excess body fat. If you really did yourself, a good job, but mostly that’s inflammation, full glycogen retention, water retention throughout the cells in the body. And you can go and get rid of several pounds with one amazing session in the sauna or one sweaty hot spinning class workout. Brad (1h 12m 56s): And then you recalibrate, if you don’t believe me, check out YouTube video with my former podcast guest, Nick Simmons, and you can search the title. We’ll have it in the show notes where he lost 10 pounds in 24 hours on a hundred dollars bet. And how did he do it mostly through fasting, right? Because even when you consume a meal, a one gram of carbohydrate in the meal binds with three to four grams of water fluid in the body. So it’s easy to gain weight after a single meal, right? When, when you’re talking about retaining a lot of that. And so he was doing some fasting for the 24 hours, kind of cutting back on his water intake on the second day and did a couple of hard workouts, including a final, hot, sweaty workout, where he was pulling the concept two rower wearing the, the trash bag over his sweatsuit and boom, back on the scale and 10 pounds gone in a single day. Brad (1h 13m 50s): So that’s an extreme case where he’s playing with a tiny bit of dehydration and depletion from not eating, but again, all of us will cycle up and down five pounds. And if you want to get obsessive about it, you can go weigh yourself, you know, 20 times over the next five days and be regaled at the, the fluctuation of weight. So maybe the best way to measure progress here is to get a tight fitting pair of pants or take a picture of yourself with minimal clothing and look for the muscle definition or lack of muscle definition and the changes that you make when you drop excess body fat over times and expect to do it at a very gradual and sensible rate. So it will be sustainable realizing that these big numbers that people put up are mostly a reduction in inflammation and glycogen retention from extreme exercise, extreme dieting, and all that crazy stuff. Brad (1h 14m 40s): That’s unsustainable. All right. Good luck. Hope you enjoyed it. Hope you got some insights from it. And Hey, how many times have you been hungry in the last 30 days or 30 years? Yes, it’s okay to tip toe out there and push the boundary a little bit, especially if you want to drop a pound or two or five of excess body fat. And when it comes to exercise, it doesn’t have that direct application from the calorie burning that we always thought. But when you exercise sensibly, when you get a lot of low level cardio and those brief explosive workouts, Oh my goodness. It’s going to have a super positive effect on your appetite and on your eating habits. So it’s a comprehensive lifestyle approach. Brad (1h 15m 20s): And now, you know, you can zero in on it. You can relax, breathe a sigh of relief that it’s actually not too hard to drop excess body fat. You just got to form that intention and go out there and do it. Thank you so much for listening. Thank you for listening to the show. I love sharing the experience with you and greatly appreciate your support please. Email podcast@bradventures.com with feedback, suggestions and questions for the Q and A shows, subscribe to our email list of Brad kearns.com for a weekly blast about the published episodes and a wonderful bimonthly newsletter edition with informative articles and practical tips for all aspects of healthy living. Brad (1h 16m 4s): You can also download several awesome free eBooks when you subscribe to the email list. And if you could go to the trouble to leave a five or five star review with Apple podcasts or wherever else, you listen to the shows that would be super, incredibly awesome. It helps raise the profile of the B.rad podcast and attract new listeners. And did you know that you can share a show with a friend or loved one by just hitting a few buttons in your player and firing off a text message? My awesome podcast player called overcast allows you to actually record a soundbite excerpt from the episode you’re listening to and fire it off with a quick text message. Thank you so much for spreading the word and remember B.rad.

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Insights On Spirituality and Exercise With Shawn Askinosie

(Breather) In this breather show, Shawn Askinosie and I continue our wonderful conversation, which becomes more spiritually-minded as we touch on topics such as grief, aging, and a little bit about neuroscience, too.

Shawn gets really personal and opens up about his own experience with loss and what he refers to as “the long arch of grief.” We talk about aging and the soul, and Shawn shares why he thinks of our souls as ageless. We also talk about the neuroscience behind forward acceleration and gravity, and its effect on our brain and on our equilibrium.

TIMESTAMPS:

There are times when we need help with our emotions and spiritual selves. [01:09]

Grief is grief.  It doesn’t matter how old you are. [05:28]

Life is so comfortable we don’t have many opportunities to push our bodies to the limit. [08:37]

One has a sense of freedom that is very spiritual. [11:38]

LINKS:

QUOTES:

  • “Many of us experience dark nights of the soul. Gray nights, even shaded nights…and I think it’s important we get help where we can, and not feel ashamed to admit that we need help.”

LISTEN:

 

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B.Rad Podcast

Brad (1m 9s): Hey listeners, I hope you enjoyed the full length interview show with Shawn Askinosie, proprietor of Askinosie Chocolate. And after we finished the formal show, we kept talking and this guy loves to go deep and get spiritual on ourselves, and it’s really fun. So I think you’re gonna dig this breather show where he talks about kind of accessing that, that, that spiritual experience of the incredible sense of freedom that’s fleeting in everyday life, but sometimes it’s access through physical exercise. And I share some of my insights about some of the great memories I have, especially the day that I quit my miserable job, got on my bike and pedaled 103 miles without any training and saw my quads saw God during the ride. Brad (1m 55s): And I also had just this confluence of special moments in my life of leading my career and embarking on a new path. So just a fun, little chat and more insights from Sean Askinosie I think you’re going to enjoy it. Going back to that mention of getting your, your mind, your body and your spirit, right. And here we are, we’re we’re in that advanced age group, I think in the 50 plus division and got to start looking at that even further than, than, than we did a decade or two decades ago, but how’s your, how’s your fitness approach. And we, we’re going to talk about some of that? Shawn (2m 29s): Yeah, it’s good. I’m in the midst of a push-up challenge now that is really hard for me and it’s, but what I was going to ask you about that I think you would really be uniquely suited to help me with is about middle-way through the pandemic. I needed to engage the services of a therapist / teacher. Something beyond my spiritual director, and I’m not ashamed to say, you know, I was In a pretty tough spot and many of us experience, if not dark nights of the soul, maybe gray nights or shaded nights of the soul. Shawn (3m 12s): And I, I think it’s important that we get help, where we can, and that we’re not ashamed to admit when we need help. And this woman that’s been helping me. This has just been by telephone weekly. She’s been awesome. And last week in our session, and it wasn’t necessarily from any prompting from her, if it was, it was very subtle, but for whatever reason, I evoked in my mind the first moment in my life, where I had a knowing of freedom. Shawn (3m 54s): And I don’t mean where I believed in my freedom or had a, a book knowledge of my freedom or someone told me that I had freedom, but an experiential knowing of freedom. And as I was talking with her, it came to me that when that was, I was in the third or fourth grade, probably the third grade. And so I was maybe eight or nine years old, and I rode my bike to school by myself for the first time. And so this would have been like 69 and I had a stingray bicycle and my house was, you know, maybe a mile from the school and in riding the bike. Shawn (4m 39s): I remember the details of the, the, the sun, the crispness of the day and just that forward motion. And when I was describing it to her, I broke down. I started crying, describing this bike ride to her. And parenthetically, I’ll note, we didn’t talk about this in part one, but my dad died when I was 14 of lung cancer. As I mentioned, he was a lawyer and it was really tough for me, very, very, very tough. That grief, or should I say unresolved grief 25 years later after the murder case is the thing that then triggered me into finding my vocation and finding my calling because I, I volunteered in the palliative care unit of a hospital, big hospital for five years on Fridays, just visiting patients, dying patients. Shawn (5m 28s): And that I did after that murder case that I described to you. And so that was really tough. And it’s, you know, the, the long arc of grief, I don’t care how old you are. Your dad died in 2020, you know what I’m talking about? And even though he was 97 years old, doesn’t matter if you were in your fifties or if you were in your teens, grief is grief. A broken heart is a broken heart. You know, sorrow is sorrow. I don’t care what age you are. I believe your soul is ageless. Your true self, your true nature has no age has no age. And so my nine year old soul or what my nine-year-old that I thought was for whatever reason, I, I was evoking this freedom and this bike ride, and I couldn’t figure out what it was. Shawn (6m 17s): I don’t know what it was. I’m not that athletic of it. I mean, I did, I wrestled in high school for a little bit, and I did martial arts in college when I lived in Japan. But then I kind of gave it up for debate and law school and all that stuff. And I just, I walk a lot. That’s pretty much what I do. And now I do ups and stuff all that aside. But so then last week I started thinking, okay, I need to go back to the short film called Slomo about this, this, this neurologist who gave it all up because of neurological condition that he had. He lived in San Diego. If you haven’t seen the video, I strongly encourage you to do a Google Slomo and it Slomo all one word. And this guy started inline skating on the boardwalk in San Diego. Shawn (6m 59s): He’s done it every day for 15 years. And in this documentary, he, as a neurologist, he describes this position that he gets in. That’s almost like the warrior three position in yoga. So it’s one leg on the ground, inline skating, one leg and back, both arms out to his side, almost like he’s flying head down, but he’s slow. It’s, it’s, it’s fairly slow. It’s not the super speed. And he describes it as reaching this place, (some would say the zone or flow state) I don’t think it’s that perhaps it is, but it’s, he talks about this, the science behind the neuroscience behind acceleration, forward acceleration and the, and gravity and the center of gravity in the earth, sort of pulling down and its effect on our brain and our equilibrium. Shawn (7m 51s): And he says that maybe in skaters or skiers or surfers, or, but what I was going to ask you since I’m not super athletic right now, I don’t, I haven’t done skating or inline, but I, the reason I want to figure out what that is for me is because it takes you to a place. It’s a place it’s a meditative place. And I meditate a lot, you know, I, I pray every morning, but I want to experience that in a, in something that I can do physically, that will bring me to that sort of maybe forward acceleration or what do you, what do you think about that? Brad (8m 33s): Wow. Shawn (8m 33s): I know you’re gonna know about this. I know you’re gonna know about it. Brad (8m 37s): I mean, that example is pretty bizarre. It’s hard to relate to what the guy’s talking about with this positioning of his body. But I think, you know, life is so comfortable that we don’t have many opportunities to, you know, to, to push the body to the limit once in awhile and know I’ve been doing this my whole life. And it’s just so rewarding that I think of it as second nature, but, you know, I’ve, I’ve had a transition in my athletic practices over my, over my lifetime. And I used to be an endurance athlete. And that was my whole thing was going all day and pushing my body and putting my brain into that state where it’s like, we got to concentrate for a seven hour bike ride and that’s all fine and dandy. But now like my, my complete passion is an event that takes one second. Brad (9m 21s): I’m, I’m a high jumper and that’s, that’s all I think about. It’s, it’s so fun to get out there and try to perfect my technique. And from the time you leave the ground to, to landing in the pit, it’s one second. You don’t even know what’s going on. I have to watch the video to see if my technique is right, because it happens too quickly, but I’m just referencing that as my talking point is like you go out there and do something that’s so different from your day-to-day experience of typing a computer, laying in a bed or sitting in a chair and it can be, you know, it can be a real rush in that sense that maybe that’s what you’re relating with with the guy in the, in the show. And especially if you’re, you know, not super competent at something. Brad (10m 3s): And now you pick up everyone’s into archery now, the cool people or whatever it might be, but, you know, I’ve been skiing my whole life and my friend, who’s an expert skier gave me a little tip on the slopes last month. And I had from the second, he said it, you know, the next three days I felt like I own the whole mountain. I had broken through from an entire lifetime of being scared to get out of control. And now I’m using my arms correctly. And you just have these kinds of portals that are accessible in the physical realm that aren’t there anywhere else that I’ve experienced, maybe in a, you know, a three days silent meditation retreat, you’re going to feel the same way I did. When did that epic eight hour bike ride and climbed up to the top of the mountain because those things I can remember just like your nine year old bike ride to school. Shawn (10m 53s): Yeah. That’s why I’m I’m well, maybe should you have the time and you see that video and you can email me back and tell me what you think or something, but, but I’m fascinated by this. I’m fascinated by because, because in that age of nine years old, you know, the, the knowing of freedom is it is more accessible than like I just turned 60 last week. And, you know, for us 60 year olds or 50 or whatever, we, we, we tend to get sort of separated from that, knowing that knowing of, of freedom. And I don’t mean necessarily mean, you know, emotional freedom or, I mean, the combined physical and spiritual freedom combined together. Shawn (11m 38s): That’s what I think is very interesting about it’s a convergence. So yes, it’s meditative, but it’s, it’s kind of induced by a physical experience and not one that was like my bike ride to school. I mean, it wasn’t like I was breaking some speed record or something. It was just this experience of freedom and knowing, and I have, it was just kind of strange how it came up in therapy. And then I happened to remember that this documentary I’d seen years ago, it’s from 2013. You’ll love it. It won all kinds of awards, this documentary 16 minutes, 16 minutes, 16 minutes. Brad (12m 19s): Yeah. I’m also thinking of, I was, you know, I graduated college. I was a big athlete triathlete on the running team. And then I was immersed into work at the world’s largest accounting firm. And it wasn’t my calling, man. I could tell on day one when everyone was so excited, all the other, all the other hires were captivated by the employee orientation and the retirement plan. And I was like, what am I doing here wearing this stupid suit in this office building? And I only lasted there 11 and a half weeks. And the day I announced my retirement, you know, they were, they were pretty surprised because they’d spent all that money training me. But when I walked out of the building and the next, the next day I got on my bike and I wrote a hundred miles, which I wasn’t prepared for, but, you know, my intention was I was going to go try to become an athlete now. Brad (13m 5s): But I think, you know, combining the, that particular bike ride with the previous day, I had exited a career and like walked out of this building and felt like I was really free to go live my life, instead of, you know, to that point, I had majored in accounting and done the interview process and the recruiting and all this things that, you know, society was telling me, this is what you’re supposed to do. You go to college, you get a degree, the degree applies to a career, you know, everything was on point and then exiting the building and sitting on a bike seat instead. I think that’s, you know, that was sort of a transcendent experience. Shawn (13m 42s): Yeah. I’m sure it was what, a moment of freedom. I mean, truly that’s. Yeah, no, there’s nothing like it, really. And, and, and, and it’s not that I’m saying that I wanted the feeling for the sake of the feeling, but I want, I, but I want to experience that kind of connectivity that is combined, as I said, sort of converging with a physical experience, you know, because I have had the, I described to you, I’ve had that feeling in Africa, you know, when we’re there, I had that experience when I was volunteering with patients who were dying in the hospital, I’ve had that same kind of feeling of freedom as I’m just spending a moment, you know, with this person. Shawn (14m 26s): But I thought, you know, when I I’ve, cause I’ve read so much about you and your experience with sports and as an athlete and that I thought maybe you would have also some thoughts on this. So yeah. Brad (14m 41s): Pretty wild. I love it. Yeah. Yeah. Thanks, Shawn. Yeah. You bet. Well, let me know what you think about that. Thank you for listening to the show. I love the experience with you and greatly appreciate your support. Please. Email podcast@bradventures.com with feedback, suggestions, and questions for the Q and A shows, subscribe to our email list of Brad kearns.com for a weekly blast about the published episodes and a wonderful bimonthly newsletter edition with informative articles and practical tips for all aspects of healthy living. You can also download several awesome free eBooks when you subscribe to the email list. Brad (15m 22s): And if you could go to the trouble to leave a five or five star review with Apple podcasts or wherever else, you listen to the shows that would be super, incredibly awesome. It helps raise the profile of the B.Rad Podcast and attract new listeners. And did you know that you can share a show with a friend or loved one by just hitting a few buttons in your player and firing off a text message? My awesome podcast player called overcast allows you to actually record a soundbite excerpt from the episode you’re listening to and fire it off with a quick text message. Thank you so much for spreading the word and remember be rad.

 

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Jonathon Aslay’s Insights On Dating

(Breather)After my interview with Jonathon Aslay came to an end, I couldn’t help but slide in one last question. And I’m glad I did because that one question led to this breather show! 

We talk briefly about Mark Manson’s book, The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck (check out Mark’s appearance on the podcast here), which Jonathon praises for its strong message about empowerment and taking responsibility for your life. Jonathon actually has a chapter in his own book that echoes a similar sentiment, called “Don’t Let Anyone Fuck With Your Chi,” and he gives us insights into how beneficial it can be to learn how to let go of your attachment to the outcome of whatever it is you’re doing. As a former athlete, this seriously resonated with me.

Jonathon also talks about the different stages of evolution we all experience as human beings and pokes a little fun at himself while also demonstrating a lot of self-awareness, revealing the not-so-flatting nickname he has coined for the “righteous” version of himself. The show wraps up with a discussion about the importance of doing things for the joy of experiencing them alone, and he explains the concept of “grounded spirituality” and what “spiritual bypasses” are.

TIMESTAMPS:

Release your self-esteem from the attachment to the outcome of what you are doing. [01:16]

There are different stages with any human evolution. [04:45]

Learn how your self-worth comes into play when dating. Don’t be afraid. Date from your heart instead of the biological place. [07:17]

LINKS:

LISTEN:

 

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B.Rad Podcast

Brad (1m 16s): Hey listeners, here’s a fun breather show. Keeping the mic on after my wonderful interview with Jonathan Aslay and we got to talking. So I said, you know what, let’s make this a breather show. Because I asked him a question about the distinction between the goal of healing childhood trauma rebuilding, or building up some self-worth some self-esteem and then heading out into the dating scene with that self love as a starting point, which was kind of the theme of the show and learning how to strike a healthy balance between that and that Zen existence of being mindful. And like Mark Manson says, seeing your life as a series of decisions and actions and releasing your self-esteem from attachment to the outcome of what you’re doing. Brad (2m 3s): And I think that’s kind of the, the recurring theme of the podcast as evidenced by the title, get over yourself and my mission to maintain passion and competitive intensity throughout life, but releasing your self esteem from attachment to the outcome. So you go out there being fearless, going for it, giving it your all, and all those things are allowed and okay, but not having this ego connection where we’re inflated and deflated. And I relate to my athletic experience where it became so important and I was so driven and wanting to succeed so badly that that mindset served to harm me at many times, rather than just going with the flow, enjoying my life, appreciating the challenge and taking what my body gave me every day as an athlete and letting the process of improvement happen naturally. Brad (2m 51s): So there’s a huge difference. And you can apply the insight to parenting to your career goals, all these things that we face in life, these challenges where we’re measured and judged from outside forces, and of course tend to take these things on and own them. So I think you’ll like this little chat with Jonathan Aslay as a nice piggyback to the wonderful show about dating and healing childhood trauma. Here we go. Open mic night. Oh yeah. I was going to ask you off the, off the show about Mark. Manson’s take on some of this stuff. Jonathan (3m 26s): Oh, I was going to mention the book, The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck. I love that. In fact, one of my chapters in my book is called Don’t Let Anyone Fuck with Your Chi. But I, I love his take on life because it’s, it’s really, it’s, it’s the empowered, I’m taking responsibility of my life approach, right? And it’s about personal empowerment. And that’s what I, I like his, his work, his content. Brad (3m 54s): But some of my notes from him, I think it was the second book. Everything is Fucked, a book about hope. And he said that you want to, I guess, eventually evolve away from cultivating this precious self-worth and just be, and just see your life as a series of decisions and actions. And one of the, I think quotes was self-worth is an illusion. And it’s a form of persistent low level narcissism to cultivate self-esteem and self-worth, and it’s like, wow, that’s pretty heavy. And I can see how it’s applied to the spiritual enlightenment, where you’re just present all the time and you don’t have an ego involved in any way. And I think it can get misinterpreted when you’re dealing with childhood wounds and fucking up your dates because you keep bringing out these, these flaws, but you know, it made sense to me reading it. Brad (4m 45s): You know. Jonathan (4m 45s): I, I like to think of it as there’s different stages of evolution with any human being and right. You’re allowed, there is like one stepping stone to the next and the next, the next, I, I would say I bought I’m by the way, I have a self-righteousness in my scripting. I mean, there is a, there is a part of Jonathan who thinks he’s both stupid and righteous. I call it stupid righteous, Jack. I’m aware of this aspect of my personality. And so, and I’m now aware when it ruin it rears its ugly head. Sometimes it’s in that righteousness that I’m awaken or conscious or whatnot or self, but I look at it this way and you said it what you said and what he says is so important. Jonathan (5m 29s): It’s just about the more present we are to just the moment that, you know, each moment in our life, then we don’t have to judge what that looks like. We’re just experiencing life and that is truly living a life of Zen. So that’s, I’m just working towards it. I’m not even remotely there, but at least those stepping stones to starting with my worth because here’s sadly, a lot of people have zero self-worth. So at least get on the stepping stone of self-worth. And then after that you can reach another level of presence. Let’s say at least that’s my opinion anyway. Brad (6m 3s): Yeah. I mean it’s, I mean, zero would be okay. I think a lot of people have negative self-worth Jonathan (6m 10s): Oh yeah. Brad (6m 11s): They issue, you know, self-flagellate Tori statements and, you know, traffic in this nonsense that, you know, that, that sets them up. They’re behind the starting line before the race starts. And I guess so if you can get into the positive category and then realize that it’s not a big deal and I’m kind of referencing, you know, I used to be an athlete back when I was a professional triathlete and racer and Oh my gosh, it was so important. And I was so caught up in it cause I was a young guy and I wanted to do well, but I realized the more I got caught up in the self-importance of what I was doing and attaching myself esteem to, to the outcome of the race. That’s when I would struggle and suffer and make bad decisions and force the process of fitness to happen before it should. Brad (6m 54s): And if I was able to get to a position where I was just in love with what I was doing and going out there for the joy of the experience and not judging it, in other words, kind of putting myself worth on the back burner for a little bit. And just being someone who could get on the starting line and compete and not be afraid, I guess that’s what this would go. I’m still recording. So I might use this as like a breather show, cause we’re getting into some good stuff Jonathan (7m 17s): but like, if you can go on that first date and not be afraid of anything, you know, not be afraid of being totally rejected by an asshole, then you’re a little bit freer than someone who’s harboring this, this, you know, this kind of fragile self worth, who the self, the self worth is doing really good. Cause they went to three separate therapy sessions that week and had a coaching call and then they sit down and someone says, Oh, you’re fatter then you look up on your picture and then it boom that the bubble burst because they’re in the process of building up self-worth from, from being negative self-worth. Brad (7m 55s): Yeah, Jonathan (7m 56s): That’s a tough one. Well, I think of the book four agreements and one of the books that I do my best to don’t take that shit. But have you read, are you familiar with Jeff Brown? Brad (8m 9s): No. Jonathan (8m 9s): He wrote a book called Grounded Spirituality and this, it kind of actually, he kind of rejects some of the philosophies of Eckhart Tolle and others, because many people are doing a spiritual bypass or what you’re sharing with what Mark Manson shared. And it’s really getting into the roots of, of spirituality from the perspective of healing oneself. Brad (8m 32s): So what’s the spiritual bypass. What does that mean? Jonathan (8m 38s): Some people have this belief that if the world is in the loop, this would be more like the course of miracles, which I, I, I follow as well, but the world is an illusion kind of the matrix. Right? Some people give themselves a pass to treat others like shit, because this is all an illusion. So hence the spiritual bypass. So, and I’m kind of giving you the cliff note version of it, but it definitely not, but, and I want to eliminate, but from my language, right, right. Except for B U T T. And so these are just some but not, but, and the principals I do my best to live was four agreements from a dating perspective as well. Jonathan (9m 21s): Oh, by the way, there’s another great book called If the Buddha Dated. If the Buddha Dated and that really takes out the gender equation and is how can you date from your heart? How can you date from this place instead of the biological place that we’ve been so accustomed. So that’s another thing I try to emulate as well. Brad (9m 43s): Love it, man. Good stuff. Jonathan (9m 44s): Yeah. Brad (9m 44s): I think we got a little breather show for the, for the follow-up. Yeah, Jonathan (9m 49s): by the way, like I said, great interview, man. Thanks a bunch. Brad (9m 52s): Thanks Jonathan. Have a great day. All right. Jonathan (9m 54s): And as soon as this is out, I’ll promote on social media. I’ll let you know. Brad (9m 58s): Okay. Jonathan (9m 58s): Thanks buddy. Bye-bye thanks. Bye. Now.

 

Dave Rossi On Leveraging The 7 Habits

(Breather)“Observations are not defensive. Stating your goals is not defensive. Disagreeing is not defensive. Saying no is not giving love and compassion: you can say ‘no’ with love and compassion.”

This wonderful insight comes from Dave Rossi, and this breather show highlights how utilizing his 7 Habits (click here for my most recent interview show with Dave) will catapult you into a state of happiness and peace of mind, while also teaching you how to balance becoming less emotionally reactive with not being a total doormat.  

TIMESTAMPS:

There are seven habits put forth by Dave Rossi that help you live a life of happiness and grace. [01:47]

Compassion is not rolling over. [03:20]

It’s not events that make us upset or angry. It is our belief in them. [05:20]

Awareness is a lot more powerful than values. [07:06]

LINKS:

LISTEN:

 

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Listener Q&A and Comments

(Breather) I really appreciate the thought-provoking questions sent in by listeners of this show, and it’s even better when people share a message showcasing their amazing progress!

In this breather show, I’m putting the spotlight on some of the most inspiring messages I’ve received, and of course, I’ll be answering some questions too!

In this episode, you’ll learn about the key to succeeding when it comes to your endurance goals, and share an inspiring story of how one listener was able to avoid back surgery (in fact, their own surgeon was the one who decided to cancel the procedure!) after making some serious lifestyle changes. I also explain the different causes of muscle soreness, as well as the most effective method for avoiding experiencing consistent soreness in your muscles post-workout.

I then touch on the topic of sauna use, specifically the issue of EMF exposure and infrared saunas, and the phenomenal benefits that come from engaging in environmental hormesis for stimulating cellular and hormonal responses. This leads into a discussion about Nourish Balance Thrive’s incredible detox protocol, which was how I found out that I had toxic plastic residue and petroleum byproducts in my bloodstream! 

I also answer a question about the best kind of sprinting shoes, and explain why the Vibram Five Finger shoes have been my go-to for the past 14 years, as well as share the name of a (sadly, now discontinued) style of New Balance sneakers that I love to wear when I’m not in my Vibrams. Then I share a great message from a listener who has experienced wonderful results from taking MOFO consistently. It really is so exciting when someone who has been using MOFO reaches out to express how much it has changed their life and how they feel on a daily basis (check out more success stories here if you’re curious!), and I also share the many benefits I’ve noticed from taking Ancestral Supplements products over the last two years. And, if you’re curious about trying out some Ancestral Supplements, head over to their website, and don’t forget to use code KEARNS for 10% off!

The episode ends with some important questions about fasting: who is it most appropriate for? Is it ever too much of a stressor on your body? Can you fast too frequently? Because there are many important external factors to consider when fasting, being aware of these factors will help you engage in this practice in a way that is not harmful or stressful to your body, but extremely beneficial. 

TIMESTAMPS:

A 48-year-old listener talks about his difficulty in keeping his heart rate at the aerobic pace he wants. (180 minus the age.) [01:34]

Scott from New Zealand talks about how he convinced his doctor NOT to put him on statins and instead took the natural route to being able to cancel his surgery. [04:04]

Jerome talks about how he has noticed so many people training incorrectly and gives suggestions. [09:54]

Muscle soreness is not a good idea. [14:29]

Jeff asks Brad to compare and contrast the different sauna opportunities. [15:21]

The sauna gives a good detox opportunity. [19:12]

Jeff also asks about what shoes you should wear to do sprinting? Look for a zero-drop shoe. [21:18]

David from Nova Scotia talks about how his training with MAF approach has taught him to be rested and relaxed before competing. David also asks for more advice on parenting and hon healthy sex life for men in the 40s or 50s. [24:22]

From James Hall: “What is the difference between fasting and fueling? [26:26]

How can I maintain muscle mass and keep good energy levels? [28:41]

Target your carbohydrate intake around periods of time where you are burning up those carbs. [30:09]

There is a difference in the carb intake for women compared to men. [34:46]

LINKS:

QUOTES:

“If you get sore, that’s an indication that you overdid it, and your muscles are requiring repair, so the energy and the protein synthesis that occurs after a workout is going towards repairing the muscles, rather than making them bigger, stronger, or more fit.”

“If you’re trying to drop excess body fat, the surest path to get there is to first get metabolically healthy, and then engage in prolonged fasting and carbohydrate restriction to lower your overall insulin production.”

LISTEN:

 

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Check out each of these companies because they are absolutely awesome or they wouldn’t occupy this revered space. Seriously, Brad won’t sell out to anyone if he doesn’t love the product. Ask anyone.

Donations!

This free podcast offering is a team effort from Brad, Daniel, Siena, Gail, TJ, Vuk, RedCircle, our awesome guests, and our incredibly cool advertising partners. We are now poised and proud to double dip by both soliciting a donation and having you listen to ads! If you wanna cough up a few bucks to salute the show, we really appreciate it and will use the funds wisely for continued excellence. Go big (whatever that means to you…) and we’ll send you a free jar of Brad’s Macadamia Masterpiece as a thank you! Email to alert us! Choose to donate nowlater, or never. Either way, we thank you for choosing from the first two options…

B.Rad Podcast

Brad (1m 35s): Hey listeners, thank you so much for writing in and setting up this wonderful Q and a show. This is actually going to be more of a community experience than straight question and answers because so many of the messages are people writing in sharing their successes and enthusiasm. So I think you’re going to get some inspiration and good fuzzy feelings at a lot of these comments. And then we’re going to get into some important questions and tips too. But let’s start out with the bright sunshiny message from signed by tri positive. This is a joyous day. I’ve been following you from your old podcast. I’m 48 years old and I turned triathlete about five years ago. I’ve been trying on and off for three years. Brad (2m 16s): And finally, today I did a 5k run, keeping my heart rate at or below his maximum aerobic number of 133 beats per minute. I gave up several times before I had to stop running before one kilometer and walk because my heart rate was too high. I’d revisit again and again, and this summer, once again, attempting many,180 minus age runs where I had to walk instead of make it all the way through. Finally in the spring, I was able to go one kilometer, keeping it at 132 and now he achieved all the way up to a 5k at an aerobic pace. And that’s such a great example with this short message of how the power of the aerobic training approach, where you’re allowed to build and build and build your fitness and your fat burning capabilities without the interruption caused by overly stressful workouts that give you muscle soreness and fatigue and put you at risk of breakdown and illness. Brad (3m 17s): So just by going comfortably, he was able to increase the duration of time that he could keep his heart rate, keep his running pace without having to walk and maintaining the same heart rates. So it takes a lot of patience. A lot of people are out there with these endurance goals, wanting to blow off a lot of extra energy from the many sedentary and comfortable, convenient patterns that we have in modern life, but there’s a proper way to do it. And there’s a crazy way to do it. That adds more stress to your life rather than helps you become a competent athlete. So monitoring that aerobic heart rate and doing the vast majority of your cardiovascular workouts at or below the 180 minus age number is the key to success with endurance goals. Brad (4m 5s): And the next letter comes from Scott Wilson. Oh my gosh. You’re going to love where all the listeners hail from. Cause we’re going to take an entire trip around the globe. It’s so cool to connect with people that far away, especially in the great nation of New Zealand. So Scott is a 57 year old new Zealander. I come to learn later after exchanging a couple of emails, a very athletic family with fabulous running sons that are out there breaking records and going on with great achievements. One of them came over to run at the university level here in America. So that’s a quite a long journey, but anyway, a lot of good stuff going on in the family. And in Scott’s case, he says, I started listening to you and Sisson back in 2010, you both changed my life. Brad (4m 51s): I had to have a second back surgery from old soccer injury. And while I was seeing the doctor, he told me I had to start pumping some statins cause my cholesterol was too high. And I wanted to try things out. I told the doctor before going to the pharmaceutical route and that succeeded very well for him. He took the paleo plunge. He spent 30 days sticking to the guidelines. And after one month, this is a guy in the doctor’s office facing his mortality and getting dispense these very high risk with high side effects statins that people use routinely, but they are very depleting to the body. And it’s sending you down a questionable road when you realize how easy it is to right your numbers with dietary modifications. Brad (5m 35s): So he decided what the heck, give me a month, Doc, before I go fill the prescription. And in 32 days, he had lost five kilograms of visceral fat. That is 12 pounds. Yeah, I wasn’t overweight to begin with, but he got rid of that belly fat making a huge metabolic transformation in a very short, his cholesterol went right below the right into the safe zone. So below the cutoff. So he was no longer a candidate for statins. Also my inflammation from my back went down and my surgeon was able to cancel my surgery. I’ve been pretty much pain free since then, that was back in 2012. Brad (6m 20s): He’s setting himself up for surgery and pharmaceutical intervention. And instead just by fixing up his diet, he’s feeling great. How inspirational is that? Wow, canceling surgery because the inflammation was corrected. I wonder how many surgeries have been had by people who easily could have made a different intervention and spared themselves the knife. And, Oh my gosh, I’m thinking of myself right now. Because as you may know, from listening to shows, I dealt with a gnarly, annoying knee injury that put me out of my precious high jumping and sprinting workouts for six months. That’s a long time for a knee injury that seemingly minor because I could do a lot of things without pain, like hike and walk and jog. Brad (7m 6s): I just couldn’t do my go-to workouts where I’d get pain there right in the knee joint. So I was thinking, look, this thing’s not getting better. I’m probably going to have to have surgery. I mean, six months, the guys in the NFL have a total destruction of the knee, major reconstructive surgery. And they’re back on the field and seven weeks or nine weeks. And so what’s going on here, man? Something’s wrong. I had a consultation with the top orthopedist that operates on all the, the US ski team members. I had an MRI scheduled on the books and then somehow, finally I got wise and started going to super high quality physical therapy providers, Rod Shorey. My old friend in Los Angeles, took one look at my knee. Brad (7m 49s): Literally he examined me for about two or three minutes and he said, there’s nothing wrong with your knee, Man, but your muscles are all tight, not a up and dysfunctional. And you have to work on improving your mobility in your hip area and your quads. I, what got further care up here in Lake Tahoe at PT Revolution, and these guys were fantastic. They dug into those muscles, loosened them up. I continued with the stretching protocols that were recommended by the physical therapists and all of a sudden, my knee’s fine as it was all along. It was just the referred pain from dysfunctional muscles. But who knows if I hadn’t seen these guys, maybe I would have marched all the way into Oh, an exploratory surgery or whatever they do for people like that in my case where they really can’t figure out what’s going on. Brad (8m 33s): So anyway, Scott Wilson says, thanks to you, Mark Sisson and Phil Maffetone, Kelly Starrett. These guys are my wing man. And now I can sort out. Anytime I do experience back pain, I can usually sort it out in about five minutes. It comes from sitting too long or overdoing it and workouts, but he goes through his stretching mobility sequences and he feels better. So I love your B.Rad Podcast. Scott says you’re quite inspirational. I laugh at least once during every podcast. Thank you very much. I liked that. I even liked your rapping. I wasn’t quite sure the first time. He goes on and says, I’m also trying out your micro workouts and the high intensity repeat training protocol. Brad (9m 15s): That’s the acronym coined by Dr. Craig Marker, where your sprint sessions, your explosive efforts are a little more gentle on the body because you take luxurious rest intervals and you don’t sprint for longer than between 10 and 20 seconds. And that sprint could be a kettlebell set. It could be an actual running sprint. It could be anything non-impact, but adhering to that high intensity repeat training protocol. He’s experiencing benefits from that. And what a great note he says, I’m going to go leave you a five star review. That’s the only choice you give me and Auckland New Zealand way. And in the next letter comes from Jerome. Brad (9m 54s): Riviere a French man, 42 years old living in the amazing wonderful Island of La Reunion in the Indian ocean. Yeah. Look, this place up. It’s off the coast of Madagascar. I almost went there for a race back in 1988 and I didn’t quite make it over there. The fax machines were going back and forth. I was trying to make it work and too bad cause they had a, a very prominent event. There was extremely grueling, long distance triathlon. I think it was a 75 mile bike ride, 20 mile run climbing up this volcano. It’s a volcanic Island. Pretty cool place. Maybe I’ll visit there someday, but it’s so awesome to know that we have B rad podcasts listeners all the way out there in La Reunion. Brad (10m 38s): And I calculated roughly that’s probably the furthest away you can get from the West coast of America. Because if you get on a plane, you could go in either direction. It was still be, I don’t know, 24 plus hours of flight time. So Jerome says, I love sports in general and running trail running. We have a renowned ultra trail run here called the Grand Raid takes place in October. Some of the best guys in the world come over. It says I wanted to thank you immensely for all the work you do for the endurance community and for others who want to live a healthy life. He’s participating in the super awesome Primal Endurance Mastery Course. And if you are an endurance athlete and you haven’t heard me talk about this before, please go over to Brad kearns.com shop page, and you can click on the primal endurance mastery course. Brad (11m 25s): It’ll take you over there. You can get nine introductory videos to find out all what’s going to go in this wonderful course. It’s the most comprehensive course about endurance training and racing you’ll ever find put together dozens of interviews with the greatest athletes and coaches of all time and all kinds of instruction material. So it’s a total immersive experience. It’s really great. We’re still getting a lot of compliments on it. So it’s ready there for you. Check it out. If you’re into endurance training and trying to pursue goals in this sport, which can easily become unhealthy and imbalanced. If you don’t do it the right way. The mastery course is what it’s all about. Jerome says I’m very sensitive to the health aspects because I learned myself and see all around me that sport can be a great thing if we do it a certain way, but a very sad thing. Brad (12m 12s): If we do it intensively all day long. Good job on the English man. I mean, can you imagine writing a letter in French to somebody? This guy’s killing it. I appreciate the very clear message that you’re giving. In endurance sports like running cycling trail, running over-training is often the rule because of the durability of the trainings and the mantra, no pain, no gain. And he’s pointing out some great insights that he’s pulled from some of the podcasts and from other leaders in the space. He likes that concept of greasing the groove. That’s a quote from Pavel Tsatsouline, the noted kettlebell trainer and greasing the groove is analogous to what I like to call micro workouts where you’re just doing a set here and there. Brad (12m 57s): You’re not exhausting yourself. You’re not fatiguing yourself, but you’re living this active lifestyle. And you’re sprinkling in these little bouts of explosive effort that over time, add up to have a massive, fantastic cumulative fitness benefit. So you’re greasing your groove, greasing your groove without burning yourself out. He also mentioned Firas Zahabi, the noted MMA trainer. There’s a great clip. You can find on YouTube of him talking on Joe Rogan podcast about not getting sore with your workouts. And he’s talking about training world champions, as well as novices. He does not want them to get sore because if he gets sore, that’s an indication that you overdid it and your muscles are requiring a repair. Brad (13m 43s): So the energy, the protein synthesis that occurs after a workout is going toward repairing the muscles rather than making them bigger or stronger, more fit. So you basically, if you overdid it, you have to repair that damage. And that gets in the way of graceful and uninterrupted fitness progress. Dr. Maffetone has said this for a long tim he does not think muscle soreness is a great idea and you should try to avoid it at all costs. Now you’re going to get sore when you do something new and unusual, right? So you can be the fittest person on the planet and when you go out there and take a few polls on the water ski rope for the first outing of the season, you’re probably going to get super sore because there’s almost no way to approximate water ski going in the gym and lifting weights. Brad (14m 29s): So anything that’s new and unusual, it’s going to get you sore and the other way to get sore. Those ecentric muscle contractions, where for example, you’re lowering the weight. So it’s not raising the weight that’s causing those micro tears in the muscles that results in soreness. It’s actually lowering the weight and fighting gravity in an ecentric manner. Another example of an ecentric contraction is running downhill, right? That’s why downhill running makes you so sore is you’re landing. You’re absorbing the impact, but it’s sort of in a way that’s stretching the muscle causing micro tears. So by training, within your capabilities, not extending yourself too hard and pushing yourself too hard with more reps and more sets, you’re going to be able to avoid this recurring muscle soreness that easily can lead to an overly stressful workout program. Brad (15m 21s): So he mentioned Maffetone. He mentioned Craig Marker, the hit versus hurt. We have a whole show on that concept. So please listen to that. He listened to the Ted talk that I referenced often by Dr. James O’Keeffe. So this guy is definitely doing his homework and putting all these insights together to have a graceful and enjoyable approach to endurance training down there in Lafayette Union. Thank you so much for the letter Jerome. And next, Jeff writes in and asks about the compare and contrast the different sauna opportunities, the infrared sauna versus the traditional hot sauna where you’re getting to the high temperatures or they call it a dry sauna. Brad (16m 3s): I’m 44 year old looking to be the best version of myself. Thank you so much, Brad. And can you answer these questions? So I’ve looked into this and I, the guys I follow and respect a lot .Kelly Starrett talks about this really nicely. He really wants to see you in the hot, dry sauna and the elevated temperature causing profuse sweating is where you get some really nice detoxification benefits. My former podcast guest, Chris Kelly is also big on this idea that a dry sauna, hot, dry sauna is a great way to detox. By contrast, the infrared sauna is not so hot in there that it’s going to prompt, profuse, sweating. Brad (16m 44s): It has sort of a different effect where it kind of cooks your body like a microwave. So you enjoy those cellular benefits of a sauna experience, but in a different manner than the dry sauna, because I believe the infrareds will only go up to 130 degrees or so I’ve had a few visits in there and those are nice and have a lot of benefits. Some people are concerned about the EMF exposure from infrared sauna. So you want to get a model that is sort of EMF certified is not being a concern there. Ben Greenfield talks about that a lot, and I believe he touts one of the brands that I was arguing that there’s no EMF concerns with that sauna, but maybe some of the cheap ones that you find might be giving you some exposure to electromagnetic fields that could have an adverse health impact. Brad (17m 34s): So do a little research there, but with the dry sauna, you know, I’m a huge enthusiast of it. These wonderful kits from Almost Heaven Sauna are so easy to put together with just a handyman and boy, you are good to go with wonderful temperature therapy at your disposal. Oh my gosh, I am so dialed with my chest freezer for the cold water exposure anytime I want. And then right there, a few steps away entering the Almost Heaven barrel sauna and heating that thing up to over 200 degrees, “environmental hormesis”, Paul Saladino calls it when you expose yourself to extreme temperatures in a therapeutic manner and get all these wonderful antioxidant immune supporting anti-inflammatory cognitive function, benefits both hot and cold on a similar, in a similar realm stimulate these great cellular and hormonal responses. Brad (18m 29s): So I’m a big fan, but I do like to get into the really hot temperatures and I go for it, man. I do the sauna on a double cycle so I can get it even hotter. And then as soon as I enter my hot dry sauna, I will commence a set of 40 pushups and 40 squats and that’ll get me sweating really quickly. And then I just lie there and relax. And it’s the most relaxing sensation. I feel like I enter a trance-like state where I’m not falling asleep when it’s 200 degrees in there, but I’m just so relaxed and laying there letting the sweat pour out. And then at the appropriate time, you definitely don’t want to overdo it. And I actually have on a couple of times, maybe stayed in there too long where afterward I kind of feel a little goofy for a while. Brad (19m 12s): So there’s a sweet spot that you’ll learn really easily when it comes to exposing yourself to the, the super hot dry saunas. But Chris Kelly Nourish Balance Thrive has a great detox protocol. If you’re concerned about that stuff. And gee, I wasn’t too concerned about it until I came up with my comprehensive testing that I ran through the Nourish Balance Thrive program. And it was identified that I had toxic plastic residue and also petroleum byproducts in my bloodstream. Nasty! Speculated that possibly from consuming plastic water bottles that had been heated up in the sun. And also maybe from growing up in the San Fernando Valley and breathing nasty air. Brad (19m 57s): When I was a young guy for many years, that’s one functional medicine, healer speculated, and she has numerous clients that the same, where they grew up in a horrible polluted urban air and still showing the impact in, in blood results. And so the detox protocol that Chris Kelly recommends in response to getting this crap out of my bloodstream once and for all is to in a fasted state, go into the sauna, sweat profusely, but pop a niacin before you head in there. And you know, the true niacin they have now, anti flush niacin supplements. And so I’m going for the flesh. Brad (20m 37s): I’m going for the straight stuff. And you take a little bit of niacin. I don’t know if you’ve ever tried that, but boy, your skin gets all tingly. You can turn red and it could be a little bit uncomfortable at first to have this huge experience of dilating blood vessels throughout your body, and then entering the sauna to sweat it out. But boy, it’s pretty, it’s pretty intense and it, it feels great. And then when you’re sweating profusely, you immediately go into the shower and scrub your skin aggressively all over your body with Dr. Bronner’s or another natural high quality, like the Dr. Bronner’s Castiel soap. So that is a detox protocol. Continue fasting for a little bit after that. Brad (21m 19s): And you’re on your way to cleaning up your act. Okay. People, yeah. Go look at Almostheaven.com and see what kind of sauna opportunities they have. Maybe it’s time for you to get one in your backyard or your garage or your deck. Okay. Also asked in the same email, Jeff was wondering, what shoes do you wear to do sprinting cross-training or jogging and running long distance? So I’ve been wearing the Vibram five fingers for 14 years now, and I have no problem sprinting in them. No problem taking long hikes in them or jogging or what have you, but it takes a while to acclimate. So I strongly recommend getting them minimalist, footwear, and trying to get a more minimalist experience in your life. Brad (22m 6s): A starting point would probably be walking around the house barefoot as much as possible. And then just going for some of these shoe opportunities and integrating them carefully and steadily into your routine so that you don’t have a traumatic experience. Like so many people relate that they, they took off their cushy, cushy running shoes, donned a pair of Vibrams and got a muscle injury. Of course you’re going to, because you’ve been living in lifetime wearing cushy shoes. But after this long, the Veep rooms are my go-to shoe for doing a lot of activity, especially in the gym and lifting weights. They’re really nice to have. I mean, you can see some of the enthusiasts are lifting weights barefoot these days. Cause you get the best proprioception when your actual bare feet are touching the ground and hoisting away, it gives you kind of an advantage because you can see where the balance point is much better than wearing clunky shoes. Brad (22m 58s): But beyond Vibrams with a little more protection, our, the great model called the New Balance Minimus MT20. And I go on eBay and look for the used pairs because they don’t make this model anymore. Same with my favorite pair of Vibrams. The Bikila LLS is no longer made. And so I’m always looking and looking on eBay for used pairs that’ll come up. Yeah. Th the minimus MT20 also has zero drops. So there’s zero elevation change between the heel and the toe. And that’s a term that you want to look for that zero drop or minimal drop. Maybe you’ll get a shoe with three millimeters or four millimeters, And then work your way toward being able to function in a zero drop shoe. Brad (23m 43s): The Merrill Trail Glove is also a great zero drop shoe and there’s different models and versions of that. But Merrill makes a really nice shoe. So I’ll look for those. That’s my answer. Thank you so much for, for writing about sauna and footwear David is writing in from Nova Scotia. So if you’re keeping track, Oh my gosh, we got New Zealand. We got La Reunion. And now we got Nova Scotia. Thank you so much. You and Mark for your work. I found primal endurance four years ago after hearing you, Brad, on The Trail Runner Nation podcast. Oh yeah. I love those guys and go listen to that podcast if you’re into ultra running. Brad (24m 23s): So your advice has really helped me. I adopted a MAF approach and have remained mostly injury free for years. I was able to build up and finish a 50 miler and two 50 Ks in the last few years. With way less training mileage than most experts would recommend. I went into these races, rested and relaxed and enjoy the experience of delivering that all out maximum effort on race day, rather than, you know, killing yourself in training, leading up to these races, which is what happens to a lot of the runners there on the starting line. They’ve done a ton of hard work to get there, but they’re also a little bit depleted and not at full strength. And then the race really, really gets you. It really takes a lot out of you. Brad (25m 3s): David also says I’ve been doing micro workouts walking every day after I dropped my kids at the bus. JSW just F ing walk. That’s been inspired by listening to the podcast. So thank you and boy, David, thanks a lot for, for listening and writing in that’s really great. And he says, Hey, if you’re looking for new exciting subjects, I’d love to hear more advice about parenting. I have a five-year-old and an eight year old maximum aerobic function training. We can never get enough of that message. And maybe for topics about a healthy sex life for men in our forties and fifties. Brad (25m 46s): And Oh my gosh, your wishes come true. Because just before this show, we published the insights on testosterone, libido, and healthy sexual function. So we’re trying to hit all those hot topics and being rad in life. Yeah. Thank you for riding in David. Next, we go to Minnesota and Terry Ingram writing in. Thank you for everything you do in the world of nutrition and wellness. Your personality resonates with the title of the podcast. All right. And like you humility sense of humor. I’ve learned so much from you also a 58 and like so many others. I’ve turned my life around learning how to fuel my body with nutrient dense foods and daily movement of my body. I’m really enjoying the MOFO pills. Brad (26m 27s): I think they definitely help also working or the cold showers and daily breathing exercises I’m doing with the Wim Hof method. Wim Hof says I’m getting high on my own supply and you say, I’m getting over myself. So we’re all good going through. Maybe I’ll meet you one of these days. The, the world opens back up. And thank you so much for writing Terry.James Hall, frequent writer and listener, always with some good insights. He wants to know about striking a balance between fasting and fueling, especially when you’re training through cold British winters. Hey, interesting topic, James. And I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately. Brad (27m 7s): I’ve actually been personally on a kick to make an effort to consume more nutritious food inspired by folks like Dr. Tommy wood, Chris Kelly from nourish balance thrive, Robb Wolf’s recent show. And this concept, this idea that when you’re super fit and active, when you have good blood work, when you have good body composition, you stand to benefit less from fasting and even a carbohydrate restriction in the ketogenic realm than someone who has some metabolic damage that they’re trying to recover from, or having a frustrating time trying to drop excess body fat. Brad (27m 48s): So if you’re trying to drop excess body fat, the surest path to get there is to first get metabolically healthy and then engage in a prolonged fasting and carbohydrate restriction to lower your overall insulin production. That’s also one of the key health factors to avoid the epidemic disease patterns in the modern world, which would be a metabolic syndrome, type two diabetes, obesity, and related cancers and heart disease dysfunction from, from overeating. But I think we all have to address this challenge personally and individually, and for in my personal experience, you know, I’m concerned with peak performance as much as avoiding disease risk factors, but in the absence of disease risk factors, it seems to make sense to me, what Rob Wolf and Tommy wood and Chris Kelly are saying. Brad (28m 42s): Robb Wolf great one-liner from the show. He said, if you want to live longer, lift more weights and eat more protein, right? So if you can maintain that muscle mass, that’s going to be one of the most profound longevity factors identified. And in order to maintain muscle mass, you have to work the muscles, right? You have to throw some iron around or stretch the X three bar, or pull the stretch cords, put your body weight under resistance from doing pushups, kettlebells, whatever it is. And when you’re working those muscles hard, especially as you advance into the older age groups, and you have less ability to synthesize protein efficiently, less ability than, you know, someone like my son in his twenties, who can, you know, recover more easily than me from throwing weight around. Brad (29m 28s): That’s. When you want to really look at how to optimize your diet. Dr. Tommy Wood had a great insight on our show back in 2018, I believe. And he counsels his athletic types to eat as much nutritious food as possible until they gain one pound of body fat. And then you dial it back. Obviously you’re eating plenty and you’re starting to add fat. So that’s kind of your balance point right there, pretty simple. But the idea that the athletic type who’s performing physical feeds has a much greater nutritional need than someone who is less active and doesn’t demand that much from their body. Brad (30m 9s): So he, you know, he, he made the Quip. I put it in the recent book, you know, he says, I’m looking at these diet reports from the athletes and they’ll write down breakfast, two eggs and half an avocado. And he’s back, he’s coming back at them saying, come on, man, eat a real breakfast, make it six eggs and a full avocado, right? You’re an athlete. You need the energy, you’d need the nutrition. And as I talk about with my experience with ancestral supplements and trying to up my game, when it comes to consuming liver, liver, and other organ meats and supplement aggressively, I really do think it’s made a big impact in the last two years that I’ve been pounding the ancestral supplements and making a concerted effort to consume more liver and more super foods in my diet, the pastured eggs, the oily cold water fish, like sardines and salmon, the, the steak, like the rib-eye meat on the bone and all the things that I’m emphasizing in my diet more so than I was before, I feel like I have an overall improvement, a higher baseline daily routine, energy level, and a little bit better recovery, and most profoundly a reduction in the symptoms and the severity of these crash and burn patterns that I’ve experienced for my entire adult life going back to my triathlon times where I’d feel great, I’d feel great. Brad (31m 30s): I’d train hard. I’d be with the big boys. And then out of nowhere, sometimes I’d just be down and out for maybe two days, three days, maybe a week where I just had subpar daily energy levels, feeling lazy, not feeling like doing my regular workout patterns, and then I’d come out of it and bounce back and feel fine. But you know, the genetic differences between different athletic specimens and the, the optimal training load is so disparate that you really have to figure these things out for yourself. And these crash and burn patterns were probably be largely me trying to keep up to a regimen that was too much for me, but I also feel like it’s so difficult to nourish yourself and recover optimally with, you know, impeccable dietary habits, every single day that I do think the supplements like MOFO and the other ancestry, ancestral supplements can really help and also pointing your focus more toward those super foods, like the pastured eggs and trying to get some liver down. Brad (32m 33s): And I know liver is not the greatest tasting food on the planet, but the thing that’s really worked well for me is thawing out that liver a bit. Usually it comes frozen from the store, right? And then chopping it into tiny little blocks and salting the heck out of it and getting it back in the freezer to the point where you’re consuming raw frozen liver in these little cubes, and you just chew on them, they don’t have that strong taste. So basically you have to take the container out of the freezer till it thaws, just enough to where you can break off a piece from the, the cuts you’ve already made, you know, just enough to be able to chew it and then put it back in the freezer. And boy, it’s made it so much easier for me to consume liver on a regular basis. Brad (33m 15s): And even that doesn’t work for you, then pound those supplements and really give it a nice test run for 90 days where you’re taking a MOFO and perhaps some complimentary products like the grass fed liver or the grass fed organ mix. You can find everything on Ancestral Supplements.com and use that discount code Kearns to get 10% off. Yeah, I’m, I’m big fan of trying everything possible, optimize lifestyle for peak performance. And of course, speedy recovery being the key to all that. Okay. So there’s less justification for extended aggressive fasting and zero carb being on the diet because a high intensity workout is a stressor in a similar manner to fasting, right? Brad (34m 3s): So when you’re burning up a lot of energy on a tough workout, you are starving yourselves of energy, just like you are when you don’t eat a meal. And so if you stack those right, if you’re fasting, doing tough workouts and then bringing in wild card, number three, in my case, being in the advanced age groups, those could be an accumulation of stressors that are a bit too much. And I have found, especially in conjunction with my high intensity workouts, I believe it’s benefiting me to go home and slam extra food and extra carbs in the aftermath of these challenging workouts. So I do like the strategy of targeting your carbohydrate intake around periods of time where you’re burning up those carbs. Brad (34m 47s): And we know with the caveat that when you’re consuming carbs, without burning off a lot of energy, that’s when we get into the metabolic patterns that are super unhealthy and leading to a lifetime of disease, demise and accelerated aging. So that’s the essence of modern disease is eating too much, eating too often and forcing your body to process these extra calories. That’s a big difference from coming home from a great, wonderful outing, and then hitting the, the nutritious food hard. Again, there’s no justification for consuming nutrient deficient carbohydrates, like a Slurpee or a root beer or a bag of Skittles after your workout. Brad (35m 32s): So we’re talking about things that provide some nutritional value. Maybe you’re going to go for the sweet potatoes or the extra fruit, or in my case, the peripheral carbs that come from a high-fat dairy products. High Cacoa percent is dark chocolate, the nut butters like Brad’s Macadamia Masterpiece. Yeah. Now we’re talking, Ben Greenfield makes a good point here to where he is going for the best of both worlds, where he does engage in long periods of fasting and ketogenic type eating patterns. But he also enjoys these evening celebratory binges in the kitchen with his family, where they’re making concoctions. He might be pounding a large dose of carbohydrates in the evening time on a day where maybe he didn’t eat much before 12 noon, but then he’s doing these high intensity workouts. Brad (36m 19s): And so by enjoying his evenings, and I’ve been known to enjoy my evening, popcorn binges too. You’re ensuring that your glycogen is reloaded and that you’re achieving hormone balance and all these things that we want when we’re performing hard and doing these difficult workouts. Because again, and a lot of females experience this when they’re pushing their bodies hard and also trying to go into a keto to drop a little more excess body fat and things that are contrary to their genetic expectations for health and fertility, right? The female body does not want to shed excess body fat in the same manner that the male does, because if fat is essential for reproduction, where in the males case being lean is essential for reproduction, right? Brad (37m 6s): If you drop excess body fat, you’re going to get a testosterone boost where the females a little bit more high risk in this whole realm. So what we see often with females who are energetic and burning a lot of exercise calories, and maybe falling a little bit short on the diet side, trying to restrict calories is these compensatory mechanisms kick in that can be no bueno that can make you feel tired, sluggish, lower daily energy levels, poor recovery from workouts because your body’s struggling through what it perceives to be a sort of a, a starvation journey where you’re burning all this energy up every day, not eating sufficiently and needing to dial everything down, just so you can basically be in survival mode. Brad (37m 53s): And Elle Russ talks about this a lot in her great book, The Paleo Thyroid Solution, where she was checking off all the boxes she was doing great. She was doing hot yoga several days a week. She was going for her lengthy swims and two hour hikes and trying to keep the carbs down and align with ketogenic dietary principles. And all it was doing was down-regulating her thyroid function. A lot of people get diagnosed with adrenal fatigue, adrenal dysfunction, hypo thyroid, and this is all a body reacting to what is in total, an overly stressful pattern. So back to the male side, I clearly identified that I was higher age groups doing crazy ass sprint and high jump workouts are poorly designed. Brad (38m 41s): I might add. So when I transitioned over to the high intensity repeat training protocol, where I was getting more rest in between hard efforts, rather than trying to be a bad-ass and do great sprinting, and also not rest that much between efforts, because I have such a great endurance base and I can make it through the workout. It’s not, it’s not about making it through the workout. It’s about how will you respond in the next 36 to 48 to 72 hours? Right? So I’m doing these workouts that are by design a little bit too tough in the higher age group and making a devoted restriction of all the, the processed foods and keeping my carbohydrate intake down by default almost but not making that concerted effort to eat as much nutritious food as possible. Brad (39m 24s): So it’s been a winner for me to go looking for, you know, ample consumption of the good food, not worrying too much about extended fasting. I routinely will fast maybe till mid day, but a lot of times I’m not as worried about that as I was when I was, for example, deep in the research of writing the book, The Keto Reset Diet with Mark Sisson, you know, early on in the ketogenic movement. And we were pricking our fingers every single day and testing our blood ketone levels and engaging in extended fasting. And I think overall that was a little bit too much for me personally, again, looking at my body composition, my blood work, and having less justification to dial down everything. Brad (40m 6s): So think about where you are on that spectrum and make sure that you don’t kick in these compensatory mechanisms where you feel tired and sluggish because you’re training too hard, so hard and not consuming a ton of food. Hey, that’s a ton of fun right there.Thank you listeners for listening and for writing in, we love to hear from you. We answer everything. We consider everything. So if you have suggestions feedback for the show questions, you’d love answered right in to podcast@bradventures.com. Podcast@bradventures.com. And if you can take just a brief moment to leave a five star review for the show that would be greatly appreciated. Brad (40m 50s): This is how more people find the show. Now it’s much easier to leave a review. I think you can do it on your mobile device with Apple podcasts and the many other podcasts players that are offer the chance to leave a review and boy sharing the show. Also, you can take a screenshot and text it and they’ll find it themselves, or the wonderful podcast app that I use called overcast allows you to push a button while you’re listening to the show and create a clip of up to 90 seconds in length. And then text that over to someone you could say, listen to this guy blab. And do you think he knows what he’s talking about? Whatever you want to do. It kind of preface the, the text message they push play, they listened to it, and then they go and find the show and become a regular listener. Brad (41m 32s): So thanks for making the effort. I appreciate you so much. Have a great day.

 

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Two Meals A Day Chapter Summary

(Breather) In this episode, I take you through my new book, Two Meals a Day, chapter by chapter, to learn how to live healthily through a simple but sustainable strategy that works for everyone.

You’ll learn about how your body actually operates best in a fasted state, and that people eat too much of the wrong foods, and too often, as well as what the “wrong” foods are. You’ll also find out why snacking is a destructive habit, why eating less often will help you develop metabolic flexibility, and the benefits of eating intuitively instead of following a strict, three meals a day structure. 

You’ll also learn about what leads to dysfunctional fat burning and the power of “turnaround statements”, which can be applied to great effect to every area of your life, why “faking it till you make it” has real effects on your physiology, and how to implement winning mindset and behavioral patterns that align with your goals.

Whether you’re Paleo, carnivore, keto, or prefer to j ust eat intuitively and not put a label on it, you can benefit greatly from eating two meals a day, because this strategy is truly one that works for everyone, and also strengthens your ability to make empowering and conscious choices for yourself.

TIMESTAMPS:

Carbohydrate dependency is quite likely the number one public health problem today. [00:53]

If you want to achieve optimum health, body composition, and longevity, ditch modern processed foods and eat less frequently. Develop metabolic flexibility. [01:46]

We aren’t telling you what to eat but we ask that you ditch the big three toxic modern foods, stop the habit of snacking. [03:12]

When you are doing a dietary transition, you should not have to suffer and be in pain. [04:52]

Your body works most optimally in a fasted state. [07:55]

Clean up your act. [08:40]

Emphasize nutrient dense ancestral foods. [13:23]

Intermittent eating is the fastest way to health. You have to do it right. [19:23]

If you are not getting enough sleep or having stressful workouts, it will be more difficult to transition into this new dietary regimen. [23:52]

Implement a winning mindset. Look at your own self-limiting beliefs. [29:09]

Follow the fat-burning lifestyle. Start with good sleep habits. [35:23]

Discipline your use of technology.  Move more. [41:09]

Micro workouts are always beneficial. No pain, no gain is not the way to go. [43:21]

How does the two meals a day work? Follow your intuition. [47:23]

Chapter 7 of this book has a chapter called Advanced Strategies for Fat Reduction. [48:59]

Therapeutic cold exposure helps stimulate fat reduction and brings psychological benefits.  [55:40]

The 12-day Turbocharge is at the end of the book with action assignments in food, fasting, fitness, mindset, and lifestyle. [01:00:01]

LINKS:

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This free podcast offering is a team effort from Brad, Daniel, Siena, Gail, TJ, Vuk, RedCircle, our awesome guests, and our incredibly cool advertising partners. We are now poised and proud to double dip by both soliciting a donation and having you listen to ads! If you wanna cough up a few bucks to salute the show, we really appreciate it and will use the funds wisely for continued excellence. Go big (whatever that means to you…) and we’ll send you a free jar of Brad’s Macadamia Masterpiece as a thank you! Email to alert us! Choose to donate nowlater, or never. Either way, we thank you for choosing from the first two options…

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B.Rad Podcast

Brad (9s): Hello. It’s Brad Kearns. Co-author of Two Meals a Day with my main man, Mark Sisson. Thank you so much for listening to this audio summary of everything in this book. Oh my gosh. By the time you finish this recording, you are going to be desperately excited to go grab yourself a copy. Anywhere books are sold or get the audio book. I had a great time recording that there’s lots of fun and value added through the recording. And it’s all about living healthy in a simple, sustainable strategy that works for everyone regardless of your dietary particulars and preferences. So we’re trying to find some common ground focus on the idea that when you eat is just as important as what you eat and make something that’s doable and sustainable instead of stressful. Brad (53s): And nit-picky okay. So let’s go with the introduction and that’s where we set the stage. Realizing that today carbohydrate dependency is quite likely the number one public health epidemic in the developed world. Our human default genetic setting is to be fat burning beasts. This is how we evolved for two and a half million years. As Hunter gatherers stored body fat was our primary energy source because our ancestors never knew where their next meal would be. And so we wouldn’t have survived without being excellent fat burners and of course, fat stores as well. Unfortunately today with this overeating and continued assault on the delicate hormonal systems that happens when we consume too many carbohydrates, produce too much insulin, and especially consume these nasty refined industrial seed oils, we get into big trouble. Brad (1m 46s): So the main argument that the book presents is that we eat too much of the wrong foods too often. And it’s making us fat, tired, sick, and slowly but surely killing us. So if you want to achieve optimum health, body composition, and longevity, basically you got to do two things. Number one: ditch processed modern foods and favor of wholesome nutrient dense foods, and number two: eat less frequently. And this will help you develop one of the most important health attributes you can imagine :metabolic flexibility. This is the genetically programmed superpower that we all possess. The ability to burn a variety of fuel sources, especially stored body fat based on your body’s needs at any particular time. Brad (2m 33s): Metabolic flexibility allows you to feel great all day long with stable mood, energy, cognitive function, and appetite, whether or not you eat regular meals. Unfortunatley, we have snuffed out this superpower due to a chronically high insulin producing diet and the disease state of hyperinsulinemia that’s chronically excessive insulin production caused by consuming the seed oils and the excessive amount of processed carbohydrates. And these are some of the big checkpoints that we’re going to hit in the coming chapters about how to reclaim your health, reclaim your ability to be metabolically flexible. Brad (3m 13s): Number one is you can eat nutrient dense foods of your personal preference within the ancestral guidelines, of course, but we got to focus on personal preference for sustainability and enjoyment of life. So no more dogmatic hitting you over the head with these are the foods you must eat. And these are the macros you must attain at each meal. These are the times you must eat. We want to have a more flowing and intuitive, enjoyable approach, but the big things to focus on to make a turnaround here are to ditch what we call the big three toxic modern foods. That’s refined sugars, grains, and industrial seed oils, and also ditch the surprisingly destructive habit of snacking or this strategy of eating frequent small meals rather than a couple of big meals or a couple reasonable meals. Brad (4m 4s): What happens when you snack, even when you have a low carb snack is you still produce insulin, no matter what you consume. And as soon as you snack on something, you interfere, you shut off the burning of stored body fat. So imagine if you’re snacking throughout the course of a day, extending past that 12 hour window, that’s the maximum that you should ever eat in no matter what. In other words, you should consume your calories strive to consume your calories in an optimally tight window. A lot of people favor the 16 and eight strategy where you’re fasting for 16 hours and you eat inside of an eight hour time window. But some of the research shows that the average eating window of the modern human is almost in aligned with a waking hours. Brad (4m 52s): So people are eating in a 12, 14, 16 hour time window, right? Getting up in the morning stuff than something in your face at 7:00 AM, and then finishing off the popcorn bowl at 10:30 PM. So we want to get away from the snacking, the constant consumption of food and turbocharge that genetic mechanisms that help you burn stored body fat is the number one go-to meal source. Another item here is to honor your hunger and satiety signals at all times. So we wanted this, this journey to be enjoyable and sustainable. So going hungry, suffering, dealing with things like the low carb flu, which is a big topic of discussion in the internet and people who are going into the low-carb scene saying, Hey, don’t worry, fight through it for a while. Brad (5m 43s): You’ll feel better in three weeks, we don’t buy that at all. If you’re suffering from the low carb flu or feeling off in any way, tired, cranky, hungry, while you’re doing a dietary transition, there is something wrong with your approach. This is not about pain, struggle, sacrifice, and suffering. Another thing that we pay great attention to is forming an empowering mindset because we’ve seen, especially over the years, dealing with individuals and hearing the stories of people who seemingly are plenty motivated are doing things right, but suffering from self limiting beliefs and behavior patterns that repeatedly sabotage their success with diet, exercise, and lifestyle goals. Brad (6m 27s): These can include feeling undeserving deep down. You’re not deserving of the success that you’re actually striving for saying that you are or having the physique that you wish for. So we’ve got to uncover some of these flawed patterns, mindsets, negative statements, and instead operate from a position of forgiveness and gratitude. And we have some really powerful techniques detailed in the book. You might’ve heard of Jack Canfield, Chicken Soup author, and he has these things called turnaround statements where you identify an area where you’re with a flawed mindset or flood behavior pattern and create a turnaround statement, say it repeatedly several times a day for a weeks at a time. Brad (7m 10s): And then you start to manifest a different reality where you believe in yourself, you develop that really deep down confidence that you’re deserving. And then you take action and you live in a manner in alignment with your stated goals. It works for all manner of things like trying to improve your sleeping habits and going to bed on time, rather than drifting off into Netflix binge watching because your resolve and your motivation is not in the right place. Your mindset’s not in the right place. Okay. You’re going to love that chapter about mindset right away in the introduction. We hit you with a, a series of bullet points where we challenge F D C S you know what that stands for flawed and dated conventional stupidity. Brad (7m 55s): And we replaced these notions with E N Ts empowering new truths. Here’s a few to get you excited. Number one, we talk about how your body works most optimally in a fasted state. So fasting blows away any super food, nutritional concoction Acai bowl, freshly squeezed juice with five different super antioxidant bombs in there. Fasting is the go-to strategy to improve your cellular repair, your inflammation control and your immune function. Okay. Relatedly breakfast is not the most important meal of the day. It’s totally optional and break fast should come at whatever time when you first experienced true sensations of hunger. Brad (8m 41s): Another empowering new truth is that eating intuitively and haphazardly is healthier than sitting down for three square meals a day on and on. We go with several more. And then in chapter one, we start to get real. Stuff starts to get real.in chapter one, the title is Clean Up Your Act. So first and foremost, we want to go through your home environment and purge any of the big three toxic modern foods that are present and give yourself a fighting chance, a clean slate to start with dietary and lifestyle transformation. But if you are in a carbohydrate dependency state, a lot of things are going to be difficult. Brad (9m 24s): If not impossible to change. We have to get off that carbohydrate dependency train that’s caused by an emphasis on these big three toxic modern foods in the diet. So if there are still industrial seed oils present in your diet causing dysfunctional fat burning, you are not going to be a, that dreamy person who succeeds with fasting and going all afternoon without eating. Gee look at the time. And I didn’t even realize it’s time for dinner and I skipped lunch. All those kinds of stories are wonderfully true and empowering, but only when your body escapes from them metabolic state of carbohydrate dependency and chronically excessive insulin production called hyperinsulinemia. Brad (10m 9s): This of course leads to metabolic syndrome. The cluster of disease conditions that are driven by poor diet, exercise, and lifestyle habits, quite likely the number one public health epidemic across the developed world and these markers of metabolic syndrome like high, high blood glucose, high triglycerides, they can be righted in three weeks of restrictive eating. So if you’re coming from a place where you really want to bust out and feel better and improve your blood values that your doctor was concerned about, you can take a, an exclusion period of minimum 21 days with zero tolerance, for grains, sugars, and refined vegetable oils, and instead reach for these wonderful nutritious foods that are honored, honoring the ancestral example. Brad (10m 58s): So instead of having a, a bowl of cereal and toast and orange juice in the morning, you can have a wonderful omelette and nourishing, delicious, colorful foods that satisfy you for hours, but don’t cause that blood sugar spike and don’t involve the ingestion of these toxic agents. These, the seed oils that throw off fat burning and interfere with cellular function strongly at an immediate adverse effect on your cardiovascular and immune function. Okay? So that’s the, the essence of chapter one, cleaning up your act, going on the, the nutritious food binge going, shopping, finding some good stuff and ditching all those things that are still lingering in your pantry or your refrigerator. Brad (11m 47s): And especially, we got to focus on dining out. Dr. Cate Shanahan cites research that 40% of all the calories that you consume from restaurant meals come in the form of industrial seed oils. Obviously they have high caloric density. So if your wonderful salmon or whatever you ordered is cooked in these seed oils, you’re going to get a good contribution of calories from them. And of course we can’t examine exactly what’s going into our food. I love the sweet potato fries that the Bistro down the street serves. I’m guessing they’re probably made with some offensive ingredients. And so it has to really be a thoughtful, sensible indulgence that’s going to happen occasionally if never would be ideal, but we got to get the seed oils out of the diet to turn the metabolism and the hormonal functions around. Brad (12m 37s): So you can become a good fat burner. So we’re going through in the chapter, the details of which foods to ditch in the variety of different food categories, talking about the bottled industrial oils, the candies, ice cream, sweetened beverages, cereal, corn, pasta chips, baking ingredients, all the things you need to kind of really zero in and identify the problem, problem foods, and get them out of your diet. There’s some discussion about gluten and the other lectins that cause metabolic dysfunction, immune disturbances, auto-immune responses, inflammatory responses, and how important it is to give your body a break from all that stuff and allow yourself to heal. You’ve probably heard about the emerging science of gut microbiome health and how closely related it is to overall health. Brad (13m 24s): Most of your immune function happens in the gut, your immune response, even the neurotransmitters like serotonin are mostly made in the gut, so it can affect your mental health. And if you have this leaky gut syndrome, which is so common, driven by the consumption of plant antigens, like gluten, it makes a lot of foods problematic to digest, and it’s really difficult to heal unless you exclude those and give your body a chance to heal, and then start transitioning over to chapter two. Emphasize nutrient dense ancestral foods and super foods. So once you’ve cleaned up your system, you’re in this groove of ditching the big three and starting to choose more nutrient dense meals. Brad (14m 9s): Then you can really focus in on making the best choices in the ancestral categories. And this is where we try to rise above the controversy and the, the confusion where people are criticizing the consumption of meat and meat, red meat causes cancer. And boy aren’t, we treating those animals poorly. So we want to be really clear that we’re strongly against the concentrated animal-feeding operations, producing these inferior quality meats and poultry and pork and eggs. And instead encourage you to make the very best choices you possibly can in these animal categories because they can really result in a much higher nutrient benefit and less ingestion of the infective agents. Brad (14m 59s): For example, in the KFO animal, you’re going to find hormones, pesticides and antibiotics were in a pasture raised chicken or a grass fed steak. You’re not going to have those offensive agents because they adhere to their commitment to producing animal in a sustainable, healthy manner. Also good for the environment, people who are promoting this movement really well like Dr. Paul Saladino on the Fundamental Health podcast, talks about how the carbon sequestering of a proper farm of grass-fed animals gives you a net benefit to the, the planet and the green movement, rather than this notion that the, the animals are causing so much trouble. And if we don’t eat them, the world’s going to be a better place. Brad (15m 41s): So get a little bit of education here, know how to make the best choices and especially go looking for the superfoods and integrate those as a centerpiece of your diet. I have this wonderful chart that I made with Kate Cressinger. It’s called the Carnivores Scores, and we ranked the most nutrient dense foods on the planet in tiers. And so you’re looking at the very top with things like oysters and other oily cold water fish, and the animal organs, especially liver being the most nutrient dense foods on earth, the salmon eggs, things like that. And then just going down the list, the shell fish, pasture raised eggs and eggs from other animals, besides chickens, all this great stuff presented in detail on a single page chart, you can print it out, put it on your fridge and try to emphasize those foods. Brad (16m 31s): Things like bone broth that we tend to ignore in the modern diet, but it’s so critical and so important to our overall health, especially gut health and especially joint health. So this is a nice chapter to help you optimize making the best choices in fish. Obviously we know some of the farm fish are pretty objectionable and you really want to choose better emphasizing what we call the SMASH fish, sardines, macro anchovies, salmon, wild caught salmon and herring. So learning to make those choices definitely going for the pasture raised eggs, rather than the conventional eggs, or even the certified organic eggs, where the chickens are mostly nourished on feed rather than their natural diet out grazing on the farmlands, eating grass and bugs and worms and things like that. Brad (17m 20s): And giving them this amazing omega-3 boost. So going down in all the categories, vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds in their derivative butters, talking about dairy products and the place that dairy can have in your diet. If you make good sensible choices, especially in trying to avoid all conventional low-fat and non-fat dairy products, we talk about the incredible benefits of dark chocolate. You know, I’m a huge fan if you listen to the show and all the great agents that are in there. Theobromine, it has cardiovascular benefits acts as a memory booster reduces inflammation. Dark chocolate has a cacao has one of the highest orax scores on the planet. That’s the oxygen radical absorbance capacity. Brad (17m 60s): So the antioxidant value is right up there with berries and the other super-duper foods. We have a whole category about hydration and making the best choice in the beverages category. And that one’s pretty easy because most of the stuff that we find in the store has a lot of sweeteners and offensive agents in there. The coffee shop concoctions and so forth. So if you want to be a real champ in your beverage category, water is the drink of champions. And then the other things like your unsweetened herbal or caffeinated teas, coffee with a little bit of additives, but you know, not the dumping, the, the sugar in there until there’s a pile on the bottom. I’m a big fan of my homemade kombucha. Brad (18m 41s): And I cut my kombucha with like two thirds or three quarters, bubbly water, and then a little bit of this flavorful kombucha. And it lasts for a long time, tastes great. It feels like I’m getting an indulgence, but I’m drinking a healthy product that has those good probiotics. And then we zero in on these super food categories and trying your best to improve your nose to tail consumption of animal foods, especially liver, arguably the most nutrient dense food on the planet are right up there with oysters and salmon eggs. So you’ll enjoy that chapter. And then in chapter three, so we had the introduction I talked about. Chapter one is cleaning up your act. Chapter two is emphasizing nutrient dense ancestral foods and super foods. Brad (19m 23s): And chapter three is intermittent eating the fastest way to health hahaha. Fasting is king. It has profound anti-inflammatory and immune boosting benefits. It spurs the production of internal antioxidants like the master antioxidant glutathione, and your spike is a vastly superior to anything you can consume through your mouth. So if you make fasting the centerpiece of your dietary strategy, that’s why Mark coined the term intermittent eating as a play on intermittent fasting. You are setting yourself up for a lifelong health, a good cellular repair immune function. Brad (20m 5s): Now you got to do this right. And there’s a whole section in here about what happens when you rush into this being ill prepared and not good at burning body fat, and then trying to fast your way to a weight loss and improved health. And all that happens then is that your body perceives this lack of calories, especially if you’re a carbohydrate dependent, right, as a major stressor. And if you insist on continuing on with the, the struggling and suffering endured in the name of fasting, you will basically prompt a prolonged stress hormone response, and eventually heading to a place called burnout. Brad (20m 47s): And that’s what we see with the mainstream approach to dieting, where people starve themselves, they succeed for six weeks or 12 weeks. So you can watch them on TV, winning big bonuses and dropping a large amounts of weight with an extreme and sudden approach. The stress hormones are being produced on a chronic basis, suppressing immune function and leading to that a rebound effect because again, our genetic perceptions and our genetic genetic switches that turn on when we’re starving ourselves, it’s perceived as a life or death matter. And then you can’t burn body fat well. And so you start, for example, breaking down lean muscle tissue into glucose to fuel your energy needs your carbohydrate dependency, body needing energy from somewhere. Brad (21m 34s): And, boy, that is just entirely unsustainable and you’d go into big trouble. So the idea here is to proceed gently and gracefully, where everything feels comfortable. You’re able to last longer without a meal where you still have good cognitive function, good physical function. You can start introducing workouts in a fasted state. And we give you a really nice progression how to do this properly and really understand what it’s all about rather than suffering through an ill-advised approach. So a great way to start simple is this when strategy, W H E N, when hunger ensues naturally, and you wake up in the morning, you see how you’re doing, and if you’re hungry right away and you really need a meal to get started. Brad (22m 22s): As I talked about earlier, you’re trying to transition away from those high carbohydrate high insulin producing meals. So you go ahead and enjoy a giant omelette first thing in the morning that will sustain you for many hours, rather than trying to fast when at the same time, you still haven’t completely escaped from carb dependency. So it’s a really gentle and sustainable approach for everybody. And then maybe you’ll find after a couple of weeks, you can last until 9:30 or 10:00 AM before you really experienced true sensations of hunger. And now you’re banking more and more hours in a fasted state. You’re getting that boost to metabolic immune and cognitive function. And you’re going in a really nice rhythm where your fat burning is getting better as the weeks and months go on. Brad (23m 9s): And then you can really start to play with all kinds of different strategies and approaches. If you have more goals to drop excess body fat, maybe heal from some inflammatory or auto-immune conditions. But this is assuming that your diet is clean. You’re getting rid of those toxic three modern foods, and you are very comfortable every time you engage in fasting rather than suffering through a brain fog and jitters and moodiness and all the things that happen as an indication that your body is engaged in a stress response, because you don’t have calories available. Brad (23m 52s): Okay? So instead of a regimented approach, you’re just going with the flow. You’re deciding what to do every day based on your, your, your moods and inclinations and cravings and appetites and all is good. Of course, we’re going to talk about the complimentary lifestyle habits that help you get good at fasting and fat burning. Those are extremely important and can totally sabotage your success. If you’re not getting enough sleep, for example, or engaged in a pattern of overly stressful workouts, all that kind of stuff will come up in a later chapter. So holding your hand through this wonderful challenge and life transformation, pay attention to true cravings and honor your natural appetite donate for emotional comfort or out of boredom. Brad (24m 36s): Hey, if your body’s calling for carbohydrates, reach for healthy choices, like fresh seasonal berries, quinoa, wild rice, sweet potatoes, squash, zucchini. Don’t worry about departing from your plan a for a day here or there. If you have a celebration or something that throws you off trust that your body composition will continue to improve over time, your fat burning will continue to improve over time. And you can get right back on the horsey after a weekend of indulgences, by engaging in a strategic fasting and putting yourself back into that state of heightened metabolic flexibility. Another cool thing about two meals a day is it transcends the diet wars and the controversy, and then nitpicking because it puts the focus on fasting instead of nitpicking individual food choices and preferences. Brad (25m 25s): So even if you’re a plant-based person and we have some commentary in there for people that insist on eliminating the most nutrient dense foods on the planet, most of the most nutrient dense foods on the planet, it’s going to be a real challenge. You might get lucky with your genetics and be able to report thriving on a plant-based diet, but it’s basically a very high risk dietary strategy because you are eliminating most of the foods that have driven human evolution for two and a half million years. But again, working within your preferences, trying to talk you into a more inclusiveness, if you are restricting those animal foods, but whether you’re primal, paleo, keto, or even carnivore, everybody can succeed with the two meals a day approach. Brad (26m 12s): And when it comes to snacking, we’re not going to pay attention to that right out of the gate, because we want to get you off those big three toxic modern foods. And so if you require a snack to sustain energy, because you’re used to eating a power bar and a soda in the afternoon, and now you’re going to have a handful of macadamia nuts or a hard boiled egg. That’s great. But over time, we want to get into this default pattern of having a maximum of two nutritious satisfying indulgent meals every day, and eliminating snacking in between the meals. And I said maximum, because when you get really good at fasting and metabolic flexibility, you may find certain days, especially when traveling or not being very active, that you don’t even need two meals a day. Brad (26m 56s): You need one and a half or something like that. And in fact, we talked about a long ago, naming this book, the 1.5 diet, a meal, and a half a day, sort of a little play on cutting in half the usual three meals a day, cultural mainstay, but anyway, two meals a day is a great goal to shoot for, but you certainly can get by with less than that on those days where you just don’t feel like eating. And that’s, what’s really cool about being metabolically flexible. So there’s numerous strategies that you might’ve heard of. The 16/8 is a popular one. There’s the morning, evening pattern that we discuss, where, you know, maybe you have a busy job. You’re not able to sit down and relax and have a peaceful midday meal. Brad (27m 39s): So you might want to eat something in the morning and then go about your busy day and come down and enjoy a delicious evening meal. It’s all personal preference. It doesn’t have to be the exact same thing every day. And just from a personal standpoint here, it’s been a little bit frustrating over time to see how much rigidity and, and stress has come into the scene of healthy eating with people thinking that you have to act like a robot every single day and track every single variable. And I’ve been so deep into this for so long and been compelled to test and measure all these things in the name of writing books, but in real life. And I’m speaking for Sisson too. Brad (28m 20s): Oh my goodness. You know, he reached for a jar of my Brad’s Macadamia Masterpiece and kill that thing in one sitting because it was really good. And he felt like at that day, and the next day he hardly ate any food at all. He was out there until one or 2:00 PM, even with the hard workout in the morning and not really worried about eating. So to pinhole pigeonhole into a distinct daily routine in the name of health. I think it’s time to throw that in the garbage can and just honor these big picture principles. And so, boy, I usually don’t eat much of a breakfast if any, I might have a big main meal around mid day, but other times, if someone’s making me a delicious omelet in the morning, and then we’re heading out for a busy day, hiking, her driving around or whatever, sure I’m going to eat a big morning meal. Brad (29m 10s): So there’s no, there’s no obligation to be rigid or stress out about any of these things. Okay. So that’s chapter three about fasting. And then we go into chapter four, implementing a winning mindset and behavior patterns. And this chapter is going to help you understand the, what, why and how of eating and living healthfully and behaving in alignment with your goals and making empowering and conscious choices. So the first step is to acquire that self knowledge and look at areas Where you struggle, look at these statements that you make, these self-limiting statements or beliefs or behavior patterns, things that have come around again. Brad (29m 52s): And again, every time I sign up for the gym in January, I usually quit by April, you know, that kind of thing, and unwind this and analyze them a little bit and see what’s going on. And what’s in your way of reaching your dreams and living a happy, healthy, successful life. Okay. A pretty common one for example, is people beating themselves up over their imperfections of the past and carrying this forward where you don’t feel deserving because you are no darn good anyway. You failed at so many diets, that kind of thing. Right? So if we can come from a, a starting point of gratitude and self-acceptance and give ourselves a chance wherever we are right now, it’s okay, wherever your starting point is, even if you don’t love your body and it’s not at your ideal body composition and the image in the mirror is not to your ideal. Brad (30m 44s): That’s okay, because we can make forward progress every single day, but we have to get rid of these negative self judgements and things that keep us stuck. Regaining your health doesn’t require pain and suffering, but it requires making choices aligned with your stated goals. And I think that’s one where a lot of us get tripped up. I speak about that from my athletic reference point way back when, when my stated goal was to be the number one guy in the world and win all the races. And then when you, I look at my daily choices and commitments, I’d have to admit that I really wasn’t committed to that at the same level, as let’s say, the guy who was living that lifestyle with the tremendous sacrifice and the focus required, I kind of wanted to do things my way, enjoy myself along the way. Brad (31m 34s): Maybe that was a healthier and more balanced approach than you see occasionally from people at the very top of their professions where their, you know, competitive intensity is so extreme that it negate the possibility for living a normal life. But we, we want to be honest and admit to ourselves where we stand with everything bad does you want it, man? How bad do you want it? Watch that Netflix series instead of go to bed when you’re tired and deserving of sleep. And if you can give those honest answers and say, “Why Brad, I am absolutely devoted to finishing my Netflix queue at a very high rate of speed, and I don’t care as much about sleeping.” Okay. Then we know what we’re operating from, and you can go enjoy yourself with a smile on your face. Brad (32m 16s): And when you wake up the next morning feeling like crap, you know who to blame right there in the mirror, right? And it’s okay, just as long as you’re congruent with your choices, but cultivating that passion and gratitude, compassion, and gratitude is a big deal. And this is where we really emphasize the benefits and the importance of keeping a written journal, rather than having all these thoughts and ideas floating around in our head all day. Especially when let’s say you’re listening to an audio book or reading a book and feeling so motivated and inspired and empowered, and then the next day comes, the book gets put down, you kind of forget some of the details and you go about your busy life and you kind of drift away from those great intentions and that great motivation and enthusiasm. Brad (33m 0s): So journaling is a big part of this book. We try to make it as interactive as possible. So you’re not just reading words page after page, but you’re asked to engage in assignments along the way. And especially when we get to the finish line and the amazing 12-Day Turbocharge, that really puts everything together and get you on this focused journey to set yourself up for long-term success. One of the concepts presented which you’ll love is called fake it till you make it. If you’re having a rough day or feeling down, smile, perform a random act of kindness on a stranger, say, thank you, walk with your chest held high and your chin held high, and this will actually trigger a change in your hormonal function to align you with happiness and positive energy rather than what’s going on. Brad (33m 49s): So faking it till you make it is the real deal. We talk about controlling your thoughts and your physiology through mindful mindfulness practices like meditation, breathing exercises, gratitude, journaling, becoming a master over your emotions and living in a manner that promotes health and longevity and disconnecting from those, those subconscious behavior patterns that are driven by your subconscious, where you’re just mindlessly throwing down food in front of the TV and not even thinking about how much of the potato chip bag you’re finishing or how quickly you’re inhaling that popcorn bowl. So bringing things into mindfulness, having that appreciation, that gratitude for healthy meals that you prepare yourself or that you’re fully engaged in and aware of rather than distracting yourself, by eating a meal in front of the TV, stuff like that. Brad (34m 43s): And we talk about formulating a plan of action in this chapter. So if it’s, whatever it is, eating the eliminating the, the big three toxic modern foods, we’re going to have you write down the exact strategies and steps you’re going to take. What store are you going to shop at to replenish your environment with healthy foods? What are some of the, the keys and the triggers? Could it be putting sticky notes up on the refrigerator or on the mirror reminding yourself of your goals and your commitments and understanding that any change in habits, especially those deeply ingrained habits that come in the realm of diet and exercise habits require repetition and endurance to succeed. Brad (35m 23s): So you make that commitment, you place great importance on it. And overall that’s the, that’s the content of this chapter that I think you’re really going to enjoy. And it’s going to set you up for a major lifestyle transformation that going to cover in chapter five, follow a fat burning lifestyle. And this is where we get into just how important the complimentary lifestyle practices are for your goals in transforming your diet and being a fat burning beast, right? Starting, of course, with sleep. And I’m sure you’ve been exposed to the research. We have a lot of head nodding and validating that sleep is so important. Brad (36m 5s): Oh, yes. We all know this. And then practically speaking, we’re not always carrying out our sleep ambitions with, with good success because of all the potential for distraction and diversion and digital entertainment deep into the night. And boy, we all deserve a chance to relax and unwind from the pressures and the core responsibilities of our busy day. But we want to emphasize how important sleep is and put into practice some hard and fast rules and routines and regimens. That’ll get you sleeping like a champ referencing Arianna Huffington’s great work in this area, the sleep revolution and thrive her two books, where she talks about having these evening rituals, where you quote, gently escort your digital devices out of your bedroom and engage in these deliberate behavior sequences that actually wire the brain to associate with sleep. Brad (37m 3s): So it could be her example is taking a warm bath by candlelight and then getting out and changing into your pajamas and then getting into bed and grabbing a leisure reading book and reading by the dim light of a, a headlamp or something. And so if you put these sequences together, it might include foam rolling might include leashing up the dog for a final 15 minute walk, but you start to associate these behaviors with sleep so that your, your brain is actually capable of winding down nicely and being able to facilitate a good night’s sleep because you are locked into these habit-forming behavior patterns. And obviously the biggest thing in the way is the excess amount of artificial light and digital stimulation after dark. Brad (37m 50s): So we talk about creating an optimal sleeping environment. We talk about engaging in evenings that are mellow and dark and quiet and relaxing. If you insist on consuming digital entertainment, try to prioritize that stuff too earlier in the evening. And passive entertainment is more relaxing than the, the, the proactive stuff such as crushing your email inbox in the late hours of the evening. So it’s a little easier to sit back and watch a show and probably more aligned with healthy, balanced lifestyle. But again, if those final hour or two hours before bed can be filled with these calming mellow activities, such as perhaps a hobby: drawing, shaping clay, clay sculptures, taking the dog for a walk, talking, visiting, regaining the lost art of socializing, that kind of stuff, playing cards, taking that bath, going into the, the spa jacuzzi, great stuff like that. Brad (38m 51s): Vastly superior to planting your eyeballs in front of a screen, which you likely did for many, many hours earlier in the day. And so that’s all about sleep. We’re also talking about how important it is in the morning to get up and celebrate the sunrise by exposing your eyeballs to direct sunlight, not talking about staring right at the fiery orb, but getting direct exposure to hit that super cosmetic nucleus and tell the hypothalamus that it’s morning time and trigger these hormonal processes that help you feel awakened and energized. So when sunlight hits your retinas in the morning, the melatonin is suppressed. Brad (39m 34s): The calming neurotransmitter adenosine is suppressed, and instead you get a wonderful natural spike of cortisol and serotonin. So you get this mood elevating, physically energizing effect by getting your face into the sun first thing in the morning, I’m not talking to hesitant to have to be a, a, a beautiful day at the beach, but just being outdoors into light. Even if it’s a cloudy day, you’re going to get these hormonal processes triggering. And the important thing about getting up near sunrise and exposing your, your eyes to light and engaging in a physical routine where you’re getting movement, blood circulation, oxygen circulation is that this is the first trigger to a wonderful evening, wind down where the melatonin increases and the mood elevating hormones and neurotransmitters fall. Brad (40m 26s): So it starts first thing in the morning. And then that’s keeping in alignment with your circadian rhythm, which we’ve totally ignored and disrespected in modern times by artificially illuminating our lives year round. And before we move on from the topic of sleep, we expand the dialogue to embrace this bigger concept of the essential need for rest recovery and downtime in hectic high stress, modern life realize that in recent decades, the first time in the history of humanity, that we’ve had the potential to be constantly engaged and entertained and distracted by a mobile device. In our hand, that allows for unending novel stimulation. Brad (41m 10s): So previously we had things like front porches and rocking chairs, where we sat there and stared off into the neighborhood, maybe had a casual chat with someone and just allowed our brains some downtime rather than being constantly engaged with a device for hours and hours, even when it’s time to wind down from a heavy, heavy duty peak cognitive function day during the work hours. So this section, we’ll talk about the importance of disciplining, your use of technology, your health and wellbeing depend on developing the extreme discipline necessary to power down at the appropriate times, implementing distinct transitions and boundaries. So that personal social and family time are free from digital interference. Brad (41m 53s): It entails you going out and appreciating nature. The wonderful health benefits of fresh air and sunlight has an immediate and profound calming effect on your mind and body. We talk about napping and how wonderful that is to help you catch up from any sleep deficiencies that you experience. We move right into the huge health category of increasing all forms of general, everyday movement, and a lot of commentary and suggestions in this area. A lot of the experts in exercise physiology, fitness health are identifying that the obligation to just simply move more in everyday life is more important than adhering to a devoted workout regimen and getting into the gym and sweating and throwing around the heavy weights. Brad (42m 39s): You first might want to focus on just getting out there and walking more as your centerpiece of being a more active human. But of course, there are many other forms of movement that you can engage in. I talk a lot on my show and on YouTube about my morning exercise, flexibility, mobility routine. It’s a great way to start my day. And it helps me work toward my movement. Quota. Very nicely. People are increasingly enjoying the formal programs like yoga, Pilates, Tai Chi. Foam rolling counts as a form of movement. And of course all the cardio stuff. But the key thing with cardio is to make sure you’re exercising at the proper heart rate. And a lot of people go too hard. Brad (43m 21s): And instead of getting a healthy fat burning movement experience, they’re drifting that heart rate above the aerobic maximum limit. And we have charts and graphs and discussions about this. And when you do that, you start to invite glucose burning and carbohydrate dependency rather than working towards your goals of becoming a fat burning beast and moderating, balancing the stress in life rather than adding another form of stress in the form of a workout. That’s slightly too stressful instead of nourishing and energizing. So that’s the movement objective, but then of course, we have the critical objective that’s often overlooked to challenge the body and put the body under resistance load and perform explosive bursts of energy occasionally We don’t have to do this every single day with long grueling workouts that are commonly overdone, such as in the CrossFit scene or people who are a gym rat to their detriment. Brad (44m 20s): But once in a while, these very short duration efforts where you can put your body under resistance load with straps or body weight, or proper weights, whatever feels best to you. I’m a big fan of this variable resistance training concept with the X three bar, where it’s easy on the joints, easy on the muscles, not as much soreness risk that you get from lifting heavy weights. So you can check that out if you’re interested or stretch cords, just pulling the, the tubing and creating the resistance. That way. Of course, we have the primal essential movements of body weight, full body functional exercises, like push-ups, pull-ups squats and planks, and this new concept of micro workouts that I believe are the fitness breakthrough of the century. Brad (45m 4s): I have an entire show on that. I talk about it a lot. So maybe go listen to that. It’s where you just take a short break of a minute or two from your busy Workday, not asking too much to perform some form of brief explosive effort. And it can be as simple as standing in your cubicle and dropping for a set of 20 deep squats, and then going right back to your screen or your phone calls or whatever’s going on. We also talk about the amazing benefits of sprinting, especially when it comes to body composition. And it’s something that anybody can do or progress toward the ultimate form of sprinting, of course, which is high impact running sprints on the ground. But if you have injury concerns or you’re a novice, you can work toward that doing a low or no impact sprints on the bicycle and getting all those wonderful hormonal and anti-aging benefits. Brad (45m 53s): And then putting a plug in for emphasizing recovery in your fitness endeavors and all the great science and training leaders in this area, talking about a kinder, gentler approach to fitness because the widespread phenomenon of people overdoing it, even novices and even expert level people that just push their body too hard, thinking it’s all about no pain, no gain. We’ve been socialized that way for decades. The fitness industry is all about who can push their selves the hardest and sweat the most and be pictured on the advertisement slumped over their bike cause they had such an awesome workout. But in reality, the body likes to progress gradually and steadily. Brad (46m 34s): You don’t have to punish yourself at these workouts to become really fit. You just allow yourself to build, build, build over time without the interruption of breakdown, burnout, illness, and injury, that occurs from an overly stressful approach. And that is chapter five, about lifestyle. And we go into chapter six, putting two meals a day into play. So this chapter describes the various strategies of starting with the breakfast win strategy, doing a morning evening pattern, or perhaps best of all, following an intuitive strategy in this approach, your eating decisions are driven mainly by your hunger and satiety signals, as well as by your mood environment and daily variations in sleep, work, exercise, and socializing habits. Brad (47m 23s): The cool thing about the intuitive strategy is that it frees you from those often hidden stresses and hassles Of adhering to a meal schedule allows you to go with the flow every day. Once you’re locked in, once you have good metabolic flexibility, that’s one of the benefits is that you can take it or leave it. You can skip breakfast if you want, Or you can sit down for a wonderful omelette if you’re having a, a family gathering and someone’s preparing you good food, you don’t have to, you don’t have to choose out in the name of your fixed and rigid dietary protocol. The other important thing that’s emphasized in this chapter is to make a gradual progression toward these highest states of metabolic flexibility, where you’re doing things like extended fast and so forth. Brad (48m 8s): And so we kind of take you in a stair-step where your first objective first and foremost is to mind that 12 hour digestive window. So getting all your calories consumed in a maximum window of 12 hours. And then of course, we’re going to be considering working down into, for example, a 16/8 hour strategy where you’re in an eight hour eating window instead of a 12 hour. And then finally with checkpoints along the way, noticing that you feel energetic, good cognitive function, good mood, good energy levels when skipping meals and making sure that everything’s going along smoothly, as you try to progress with more ambitious efforts toward fasting or mixing fasting and exercise. Brad (48m 59s): So that’s chapter six, putting two meals a day into play. And then we have a cool chapter seven called advanced strategies for fat reduction. So if you have been exposed to a material before in the realm of low carb, eating primal, paleo, living the keto diet strategy, and you have a good baseline level of knowledge, this one might be particularly exciting because there’s so many people out there that are doing a lot of things, right. Have a good devotion to exercise, have gotten rid of the, the nasty, modern processed foods and emphasizing the healthy wholesome foods. Brad (49m 39s): But the desire to drop additional excess body fat has still been a big level source of frustration and challenge. So here we’re going to get into it a little deeper and recommend strategies that are definitely in the advanced category. Nothing to worry about until you have built some good momentum and you just want to optimize further. So we detail a progression of fasted workouts with these variables where the progression starts with an overnight fast followed by a moderate workout in the morning. Then you go to an overnight fast, followed by a moderate workout and followed by a bit of fasting after the workout until when occurs until you start to get hungry, it might be 30 minutes, might an hour, wherever you stand. Brad (50m 30s): Then the progression is an overnight fast followed by a difficult workout. Next from there is overnight fast, difficult workout, and then a fasting period after the difficult workout. And then finally overnight fast, difficult workout and extended fast afterward guys like Dr. Art DeVany likes to do a high intensity workout and then fast for four hours. He claims that autophagy peaks four hours after an intense workout. My main man at ancestral supplements, Brian Liver King Johnson does Incredible strategy with a, what he calls a failed hunt. So a failed hunt followed by a five day water fast is something that he and his wife Barbara engage in every quarter. Brad (51m 12s): The failed hunt is a really great grueling challenging workout that depletes glycogen. So something that’s long duration getting up there and intensity. And one of those workouts, you know, the type when you feel like coming home and hitting that fridge and slamming whatever’s in your way. So what a way to enter a five day fast rather than a magnificent Thanksgiving feast, and then saying, that’s it I’m going to go fast for five days. How about that? A failed hunt followed by a five day water fast and what he’s his ambition there is to just accelerate the, the benefits that come from the hormetic stressor of fasting and starting that fast with a glycogen depleted state, you’re going to start making ketones like crazy. Brad (51m 56s): You’re going to engage in cell repair, autophagy, apoptosis, cleaning house, like crazy as soon as the, the fast begins. Okay. So that’s your kind of a progression of playing around with fasted workouts in a manner that increases in degree of difficulty after you’ve built some competency and then another category is trying out those extended fasts. So if you’re in a good 16 and eight pattern and you want to go for a 20 hour fast at one point, or maybe even a 20 hour, 24 hour fast, at one point, we have these challenges plugged into the 12 day turbocharge at the end of the book. So that’s kind of fun. And it, you know, if you’re looking for advanced strategies and you want to make a breakthrough, it doesn’t hurt once in a while to endure a little bit of hunger here and there kind of the opposite of what we said when we’re heading out the gate, trying to get good at fasting, metabolic flexibility. Brad (52m 51s): If you do get hungry and cranky and lose your energy. Yeah, it’s a good time to go reach for some food, but once you’re in that groove and you know that you can burn fat. Well, one thing that I experienced is in association with cold exposure, which we’re going to talk about as one of the advanced challenges, but boy jumping in that cold freezer sometime in the next, Ooh, 30 minutes to two hours, I experienced an intense sensation of hunger because my caloric expenditure is upregulated as I try to rewarm my body. So those kinds of things, they have their place, here’s when to do it. So trying For an extended fast once in awhile, and there’s no big benchmarks that we want to communicate here. Brad (53m 33s): Like, you’re, you get a super bad-ass badge if you made it 24 hours, but 72 is the real deal. And that’s when all the organ function and cell repair benefits occur. There’s some science to suggest certain checkpoints, different things happen, but I’m not convinced that there’s anything magical here. And furthermore, if you look at a long-term big picture going in a 16/8 pattern, every single day is going to produce huge benefits. Even if you never feel like fasting for 24 hours. And I’ll say personally speaking, because of my commitment to exercise and doing frequent high intensity workouts, these are a sort of a similar stressor to the body as fasting. Brad (54m 17s): So I’m not feeling as much obligation to engage in frequent 24 hour fast when I do frequent sprint workouts, right? There’s a kind of, what are they called? Redundant pathways, the term coined by Dr. Casey Means. So you’re, you’re, you’re starving yourselves of energy when you fast and you’re starving your selt of energy when you sprint or do a grueling workout by depleting your glycogen stores. And then you’re prompting mitochondrial biogenesis, the wonderful health attribute of making more and also more efficient mitochondria. So you have more protection from oxidative stress, better energy production. Brad (54m 59s): You’re a clean burning fat burning machine. When you do things like extended fasting, sprinting, get it. Okay. So, you know, don’t overdo it don’t go overboard, but mix the mix and match these things. When you’re trying to drop a few extra pounds of excess body fat, the magic of sprinting comes from the adaptive responses to the training stimulus and the so-called after burn effect after burn refers to the fact that your metabolic rate is elevated for as long as 72 hours after even a brief sprint workout. The reason that this adaptive response is so awesome with sprinting, is it because it prompts powerful genetic signaling and hormonal cascades that help change your body so you can perform better the next time out. Brad (55m 40s): This includes oxygen delivery to muscles, many other benefits, accelerated fat burning at rest. Obviously not during the sprint workout, a well-executed explosive workouts stimulate this spike in the anti-aging hormones. And we’re talking about something that’s so short in duration and easy to do for anybody. If you need to do low impact, that’s fine, but we’re talking about sprinting in the ideal target window of 10 to 20 seconds. The next section of the book, this could be a whole book, and indeed it will be pretty soon as I’m working on one about cold exposure, therapeutic cold exposure. Anecdotal evidence and cutting edge science or revealing the incredible potential of therapeutic cold exposure to stimulate fat reduction independently, independently from your diet And exercise efforts, right? Brad (56m 26s): So it’s like a different pathway, a different channel of prompting, an increase in fat burning and speaking of primal, Oh my goodness. This is a, a wonderful way to counterbalance another amazing, tremendous genetic disconnect from our ancestral past. And that is that today virtually 24/7 we exist in comfortable temperature, stable environments, and we’ve experienced a variety of atrophy accordingly. So the strong resilient homosapiens that endured long brutal winters and steaming hot summers out in the hot sun, trying to find food, Oh my gosh, that’s all gone now. Brad (57m 6s): And so we become soft and wimpy accordingly. So when you engage in therapeutic cold exposure, there’s so many interesting psychological benefits there that you can develop that discipline and focus. I feel like those are the biggest benefits for me, especially that if I can go do this and overcome the constant or I mean the repeated, you know, aversion when it’s about time to go jump in the freezing cold lake in the winter, or jumping my chest freezer during summertime cold exposure. Whew. You know, it makes you more disciplined and resilient against all other forces of stress sources of stress that you face in daily life. The cold exposure also delivers profound anti-inflammatory immune boosting effects, including an increased production of the super antioxidant glutathione and the cold shock proteins that facilitate an assortment of repair processes in the brain and the muscle tissue. Brad (57m 57s): But we’re talking about losing excess body fat. And the cool thing here is that when you expose yourself to cold and then rewarm the body, when you try to return to homeostasis, you turbocharge fat burning, you may have heard of this brown fat. They call it a brown, a brown fat is activated because it keeps you warm. So when you jump in the cold tub, cold shower, you activate the metabolic function of brown fat. And that in turn causes increased calorie burning in general. Now here’s the thing about cold exposure and you might’ve seen people kind of taking intuitive leap saying, yeah, expose yourself to cold. Brad (58m 37s): And then you’ll burn, you’ll activate brown fat and you’ll lose weight. The thing is that there’s a counter regulatory effect of in the name of an increased appetite. So you’re going to get a hunger spike. If you engage in this therapeutic cold exposure, you may have heard of biohacker Ray Cronise former NASA scientist. Who’s been doing a lot of cold exposure studies. He was famous for his so-called shiver walks where he’d walk around in the winter in the South in freezing near freezing temperatures, just wearing a t-shirt or sleeping with extremely minimal bed covering. And he lost, I believe it was 25 pounds of body fat in six weeks through this cold thermogenesis experiment. Brad (59m 21s): So that’s great. But when you Lower the body temperature, you’re going to get a spike in appetite because of the increased calorie burning. So the trick here to lose excess body fat is to kind of work through that hunger spike and continue to fast for a few hours after your cold exposure session. Keep in mind that that ghrelin spike that’s the prominent appetite, stimulating hormone of grilling, which actually gets your stomach growling. Dr. Cate Shanahan, nice pneumonic. To remember the term of the hunger hormone that spike will subside in about 15 or 20 minutes when your body realizes that you’re not going to feed it. And then you’ll kick into super massive, awesome fat burning. Brad (1h 0m 1s): And boy, so many people sharing that they getting that last few pounds of body fat off just by engaging in daily cold showers, or maybe even getting more serious with jumping into cold water and so forth. So that’s a fun section of the book to acquaint you maybe interest you in a little bit. And then we get into the wild times of the 12-Day Turbocharge. And it’s a standalone program at the end of the book that picks and pulls from all the chapters. And it will allow you to dial in this long term, two mealw a day lifestyle in a very powerful manner, drawing upon all the knowledge and suggestions that you’ve been hit with throughout the book and making an organized experience where every single day for 12 days, you will tackle an assignment in each of these areas, food, fasting, fitness, mindset, and lifestyle. Brad (1h 0m 52s): So there’s an action item and a corresponding journal exercise. Sometimes it’s just a journal exercise, right? With mindset. You’re going to write down your self limiting beliefs and figure out ways that you can start to overcome those, but mainly there’s a intensive journaling component. And then you’re going to be doing things like the kitchen pantry purge and the other exercises to optimize your environment. 12 days, pretty intense. You’re going to be devoting, I don’t know, one to two hours a day, perhaps, but again, the whole idea here is to expose yourself to a bunch of these positive behaviors. And then as you set forth for the rest of your life, kind of dial in the things that are going to work for you and be doable and sustainable. Brad (1h 1m 34s): There’s also a really super cool FAQ section in here with really long thoughtful answers. And these are, I would say an amalgam of actual questions that we get. So they’re kind of nice setups for a really good answer. No dumb questions allowed, right? So one of them might be, how do I know I’m ready for an aggressive fasting challenge? And then here go your answers that the topic of snacking, what if I really like snacking? And it’s a good break from my workday? Can I, will you allow me to have a snack here and there? And so I think you’ll enjoy that section given you some real life practical experience and answers from, you know, the battles that we’re all trying to fight when we’re out there in daily life, trying to dial in our two meals a day lifestyle. Brad (1h 2m 18s): Thank you so much for listening to This detailed summary of all the chapters. I hope you’re super excited about getting a book. Hey, and if you like the audio delivery, why don’t you go grab the audio book? I had a great time narrating it. There’s always added value and add living to make the audio book a super rich experience. Anywhere audio books are sold. Oh boy. It’s time for Two Meals a Day. Thank you. Bye. Bye Brad Kearns here.

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Carnivore Insights Inspired By Dr. Paul Saladino

(Breather) “Plants cannot run away, or bite or claw their way to freedom. Plants want to survive and reproduce, and therefore, they developed a variety of toxins to protect themselves from being eaten.”

This insightful quote comes from Dr. Paul Saladino, author of The Carnivore Code, who has talked about the amazing, wide-ranging benefits of the carnivore diet in previous B.Rad episodes. In fact, his insightful newsletter was the inspiration behind this episode!

If you’ve been listening to this podcast for a while, then you have probably heard about my own personal journey with carnivore (and carnivore-ish), and the incredible results I experienced from making the switch. While I personally did not come to carnivore as a solution for serious issues, like an autoimmune-related condition, committing to a mostly plant-free lifestyle (and if you want to see how many delicious plants are still actually considered OK on carnivore, check out the Carnivore Scores Chart here) has changed my perspective on a lot of things about my health in hindsight. Now, that’s not to say I was unhealthy by any means. But going carnivore and being able to see the way that has greatly impacted my health has made me realize now that I had gotten used to a normal that maybe wasn’t as optimal as I thought. 

In this episode, you’ll learn what foods to avoid like the plague, which practice is a great way to get hormesis, how fasting affects inflammation recovery, and which plant foods are the least harmful to the body. You’ll also learn about the staples of Paul’s incredibly healthy diet, and the foods Dr. Cate Shanahan refers to as “the Four Pillars of Health.”

TIMESTAMPS:

The number one thing you want to remove from your diet is refined vegetable oils. [03:54]

When you are looking at meat, make sure you get grass fed instead of animals raised on corn and soy. [08:03]

Plants vary in their toxicity levels for individuals. Maybe focusing on nice “healthy vegetables” is a problem for your digestion. [10:24]

The organ meats support the same organs in the human when eaten. [14:13]

You are encouraged to experiment with your own diet, to see how different things affect your health. [21:58]

Fasting is one of the greatest ways to get hormesis, which is a brief stressor that delivers a net positive benefit. [26:15]

Brad talks about the great athletic feats of Dude Spellings running rim to rim in Grand Canyon while fasting as well as Zach Bitter’s hundred-mile run. They found that fasting reduced their recovery inflammation. [29:41]

Humans are omnivores. The ancestors ate vegetables but in very small amounts. Plants are merely survival food. [33:00]

The main things to avoid are the most offensive or most potentially toxic plant foods, nuts, seeds, legumes, grains, and leaves. [34:29]

Some plant foods that are less offensive are sweet fruits in season (very important), honey, squashes, avocados, olives, and white rice, and cucumbers without skin and seeds. [36:01]

Brad’s list of survival foods includes 80% or higher dark chocolate, avocados, sweet potatoes, even corn tortillas, honey, and occasionally buttered popcorn, and even more foods that will surprise you. [38:48]

Saladino’s diet consists of bone broth, organ meats, and a lot of fat.  [43:26]

Dr. Cate Shanahan recommends fruits and vegetables, fermented foods and organ meats, and meat on the bone.  [46:54]

LINKS:

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B.rad Podcast

Brad (1m 38s): Okay. Listeners get ready for more, more, more insights about the extremely compelling and increasingly popular carnivore diet or carnivore ish diet or as Mark Sisson coined at one of his recent blog posts, Carna flex. Whew! Okay. Anyway, this show is inspired by a great newsletter from Paul. Saladino. One of the de facto leaders of the carnivore movement. He’s got the Fundamental Health Podcast, he’s got The Carnivores Code. He’s been a wonderful guest on this podcast. He is a straight shooter. He backs it up with incredible scientific reference and knowledge base. So I’m really paying attention to everything that he’s saying and testing it out in my personal life with my dietary practices. Brad (2m 24s): And I think that’s gotta be the end all as opposed to this intellectual exercise of listening to the debating experts and someone trying to conclude what’s right for you is go out and test things. But I love Paul’s starting point where he’s talking about if you’re already kicking ass, we’re talking about moving from kicking ass at level seven to level nine. We’re compelled to constantly be on a quest for peak performance. I was just mentioning this on another podcast I did with Mikki Williden, where I became accustomed to a certain normal. That was pretty darn good in comparison to the pathetic average lazy ass unhealthy modern citizen. Brad (3m 4s): But for me, I got used to a normal that maybe wasn’t that optimal and I can reference years past in recent times, feeling much worse and much less fit than I am now. Thanks to dietary revisions, as well as revising my exercise program. My workouts. I’ve talked about this on the show where I’ve toned down the degree of difficulty of my most intense sprint workouts to great benefit to where I can recover faster, do more of them and not engage in that routine muscle soreness, that muscle damage that basically puts improvement on hold while you’re trying to recover from an overly stressful workout. So this whole deal here with dietary experimentation, and I guess pursuing what would be called a niche or an extreme diet is about discovering, going from level seven to level nine. Brad (3m 54s): So let’s do a nice tight overview. These are a blend of quotes from Paul’s email newsletter, as well as my color commentary. And he starts out really wonderfully inspired by Dr. Cate Shanahan, the world’s number one crusader against the refined industrial seed oils. And Paul was bringing that to center stage saying, this is the number one thing that you want to remove from your diet, whatever, put carnivore aside for a moment or vegan plant-based or wherever you’re headed. We have to get rid of these seed oils, no exceptions avoid them like the plague search YouTube for Brad Kearns, Cate Shanahan seed oils. And you’ll see a nice 15 minute interview. Brad (4m 34s): I think sometimes watching it visually is really powerful because Kate really impresses the point. And you’ll be convinced that you got to get rid of this stuff and be ruthless about your elimination of vegetable oils. Pretty easy to do in the home, right? You’re going to throw away immediately throw away all the cooking oils, canola, corn, soybean, sunflower, safflower, all the boxed and packaged and frozen crap that contains seed oils in the ingredient list. Oh my gosh. I used to indulge in Ben and Jerry’s once in a while, maybe a decade or more ago. And if you look on some of their products, these hippie trippy cool laid back, Vermont guys are pumping vegetable seed oils into the ice cream container. Brad (5m 16s): Ah, disgraceful. Also, we have to be really vigilant when we’re out dining at restaurants because most of restaurant meals, of course at fast food, but also at medium to fine dining we’ll routinely cook your meal in these seed oils unless you request otherwise. So the seed oils are toxic immediately upon ingestion, and they’re integrated into your cell membranes because they resemble healthy cells. So the body’s confused when you ingest this chemically produced artificial agent. What happens when they, the seed oils get integrated into healthy fat cells is the fat cells become dysfunctional. So they’re difficult to burn off of your body if have cellulite. Brad (5m 58s): That seemed to be stubbornly attached, even though you’re working out and perhaps losing weight. That’s one reason is because you have dysfunctional fat cells and you really have to detox and get this stuff out carefully. Over time. Cate is so strong on this that she says that consuming industrial seed oil is literally no different than consuming a bottle of radiation. And there’s an interesting study that Cate sided on one of our interviews, where if you smoke a cigarette, you experience an immediate disturbance in healthy cardiovascular function. Your arteries become less supple. Everything starts to work less efficiently, and it lasts for about eight hours. Brad (6m 41s): Yes, cigarettes are bad news, but guess what? The study in question, I think it was a healthy young college subjects, a single dose of French fries, maybe going for a medium set of fries results in a 24 hour disturbance to healthy cardiovascular function. This is not a recommendation to switch from French fries to smoking cigarettes, but it’s a pretty shocking insight. What happens is your nitric oxide levels go down immediately. That’s the thing that makes your artery smooth and supple. And you basically are recovering from about a dose of poison. The other huge thing about seed oils is that they compromise your ability to burn body fat. Brad (7m 25s): Therefore, if you’re trying to, let’s say restrict dietary carbohydrates, get rid of that processed junk, that sugar, those excess grains, and become a fat burner. If you’re not good at fat burning and you start cutting carbs out of your diet, guess what might happen? That’s right. You’re going to struggle, suffer. You’re going to experience an intense appetite for quick energy carbs because you can’t burn body fat. So you’re disconnected from all those wonderful benefits that we tout and extol and all the books and all the primal, paleo and keto commentary. So that’s number one is getting rid of those seed oils. Thank you, Paul, for emphasizing that and thank you Cate for doing so for so many years. So back to the Saladino email’s a list of things to do. Brad (8m 7s): You’re getting rid of that, that junk. And then you’re emphasizing meat and organ meats from well raised grass fed and grass-finished animals instead of animals raised on corn and soy. And I think here emphasizing this point of getting the clean meat, rather than indiscriminately saying, I’m switching over to a meat based diet. We can resolve the, the controversy, the confusion, the disputes between the plant-based vegan, vegetarian dogma, and the crazy carnivore insights. So it is indeed we all agree that it’s cruel to the animals. It’s unhealthy for the planet. And it’s unhealthy for humans to consume animals raised in the concentrated animal, feeding operations, the KFO, or feed lot animal. Brad (8m 54s): Now then we have to make a distinction between finding this sustainably raised animal and disconnecting from the dogma that you are a pathetic immoral creature because you’re consuming another animal. And if we have to compare, for example, the destruction, the overall destruction to humanity caused by eating the burger patty inside the McDonald’s or the, the bun and the soda and the French fries, because the, the latter are driving this global epidemic disease of metabolic syndrome and costing trillions of dollars of economic progress. Because we have to take care of a lot of sick people that are having an incredibly compromised quality of life. Brad (9m 42s): So let’s pick on the bun, the soda and the French fries and the meat. That’s a personal and moral decision. But if you want to get the big picture realized, some of the research that Paul has talked about on the show is Robb Wolf is doing a great job here too, at The Healthy Rebellion, talking about these sustainable farming, where the animals that are raised properly grassfed animals can actually have a carbon sequestering effect. In other words, a net positive to the problem of carbon emissions on the planet. The exact opposite of what the vegan vegetarian dogma is talking about in general, talking about eating any kind of animal. Okay. So on Paul’s newsletter, he had some points going down. Brad (10m 23s): Number one was avoid seed oils. Number two was to eat the sustainably raised clean animals. And then number three, if you’ve chosen to include carbs, find ancestrally consumed low toxicity plants, and low toxicity would be individual based here, right? So if there, if a plant is toxic to you or certain plants not toxic, nothing happens, you feel fine, then you would get a pass, but there are categories of plants that tend to higher toxicity levels, and then others that tend to be more friendly. So I’m also thinking in the back of my mind about this argument of trying to go from level seven to level nine, and I’m all about that. Brad (11m 6s): And this experience of drifting away from a, a high plant intake diet to a largely animal-based diet with less plant intake is interesting because I didn’t report any adverse health effects from eating my wonderful, beautiful salad every day, and going to the trouble of sourcing a whole bunch of whole variety of plants and putting up these huge stir fry meals that I basically prepared in the name of health most every day. But guess what? When I had this plant heavy diet with the daily salad and the huge stir fries, I had all kinds of digestive and elimination relevance. Brad (11m 47s): Okay. So I thought this was normal quote unquote, or I guess level seven. This would be a frequent bloating, gas, transient, abdominal pain, and all kinds of irregularities with my elimination patterns. In other words, leaky pipes for my entire life indirect association with running or difficult workouts. And I always blamed it on the workouts that leaky pipes, but it doesn’t happen anymore. Now that I’ve eliminated this massive intake or this substantial intake of assorted and varied colorful plants in the name of health, the green smoothie goes on that list too. And I think devoted listeners have heard me talk about this a lot where I reliably experienced a bloated stomach for several hours after preparing the super-duper maximum nutrition green smoothie, where I was stuffing down a raw frozen kale, celery, spinach beets, blended it up with a bunch of protein and other cool stuff, and then getting a balloon stomach for a few hours and thinking that was in the name of health until I second guessed myself, same with my pan fried red cabbage was like my favorite thing to pan fry. Brad (12m 57s): And now I realized that was directly associated with leaky pipes and gas. And it was a tough thing for me to digest. So here’s the thing. I was pursuing health optimization, right? So I thought the salad was about the epitome of the healthiest meal you could get with all those different colors and different ingredients in there. Of course, I also had meat and healthy oils and nuts and seeds and things that cross the board that are delivering all these nutritional benefits. But guess what? It’s pretty much undisputed. It’s hard to make an argument against a powerhouse salad paling in comparison in terms of a direct nutritional profile calorie for calorie. Brad (13m 42s): Oh, however you want to do it. It pales in comparison to the true superfoods of the planet, such as you see on the carnivores scores chart. So the grass fed liver, bone broth, pastured eggs, wild caught salmon, the other oily cold water fish in the smash family that sardines mackerel, anchovies, salmon, and herring, the shellfish, especially oysters. And just reviewing that chart and looking where salad would fall objectively speaking. Boy, does that give you a cause for reflection? Okay. Let’s go back to some quoting from Paul’s newsletter quote, pretty easy so far, right? We’re going from meat, organs, low toxicity plants. Brad (14m 22s): And why should you be careful with plants as your carbohydrate choice? Because plants exist on a spectrum of toxicity. They are not necessarily our friends, unlike animals, plants cannot run away or bite or claw their way to freedom. Plants want to survive and reproduce also. And therefore they developed a variety of toxins to protect themselves from being eaten end quote. Now the first couple of times I heard this, it sounded kind of goofy, right? Like one of those flawed logic insights like you see on Game Changers when they show the extremely muscular ox and they say, ah, look, how many muscles this ox has? Brad (15m 2s): Do you think it’s eating meat? No, it’s eating grass all day. And then drawing a flawed analogy to what the human dietary choices to be, or, or kind of the commentary that Dr. Josh Axe gave me during our interview when he said that the light supports like concept a, which is the long-time ancestral tradition of consuming the, the, the animal organ and nourishing the health of the corresponding organ in the human. And this is scientifically validated because when you consume liver or you consume kidney or heart, you’re getting the same nutrients that support healthy heart function in your own body. So for example, animal heart, you can buy the beef heart at the butcher online it’s high in coenzyme Q 10, which is the super nutrient that you’ve often heard supports healthy heart function. Brad (15m 49s): So like support like in terms of organ for organ is strongly scientifically validated, but Dr. Axe was bringing it into the plant food kingdom saying that a plant food that resembles that visually resembles an organ is going to nourish the health of that corresponding organ. So a walnut looks like a brain, and so walnuts are good for brain function. Celery stock looks like a bone. So consuming celery is good for bone health. He said, tomatoes have four chambers just as the human heart has four chambers. So tomatoes are good for your heart. Now that one seems like some flawed logic or some intuitive leaps of faith. Brad (16m 30s): And indeed, when I challenged him on it, he said, if you don’t believe in creationism, you’re not going to like my answer. So you gotta be careful. I just kind of thought of mentioning that as an aside, when Dr. Saladino is talking about how plants can’t run away or, or bite their way to freedom, but guess what? This is a literal truth. It’s, it’s clear that plants manufacture a variety of toxins. And the reason they do so is to ward off predators, to ward off the garden pests, or what have you that will consume the plant and render it extinct. So even though it sounds a little fun and games on the surface, this is the real deal. Brad (17m 11s): And the reason that we consider plants to be widely considered to be fabulously healthy, nutrient dense high antioxidant foods is because when we consume these plant toxins, we prompt an internal antioxidant response in the body. And that is the reason that plants are healthy. It’s not that we’re biting into a broccoli, swallowing it and getting a dose of antioxidants bursting into our bloodstream. It’s that we’re mounting an antioxidant defense response to the consumption of these plant poisons. And that’s a very important point to understand that I honestly was shocked to learn to fully appreciate because I always kind of glossed over that chemical reaction chain, thinking that if you eat a handful of blueberries, you’re just dosing with antioxidants. Brad (18m 3s): So brilliant scientist, Rhonda Patrick has great content on YouTube where she’s talking in detailed scientific study reference for a different dietary and health habits, sleep nutrition. She’s got a whole a show about the amazing sulforaphane agent in broccoli that is this antioxidant powerhouse. They were, I believe ranking broccoli seeds as the most high antioxidant food you could get, but what’s happening is you’re poisoning your, your liver and your liver is fighting back strong. It’s going, coming on strong by, for example, manufacturing high levels of the potent quote unquote super antioxidant that we make internally called glutathione. Brad (18m 46s): So if we go down through the plant kingdom and we look up all the great antioxidant benefits and nutritional benefits of things like acai berries and macadamia nuts and dark chocolate and olive oil, we have the wonderful antioxidants, polyphenols, flavanoids. These are all poisons toxins. Okay. So just to get our heads clear, and here’s the interesting argument that Dr. Paul makes that plants come with a package insert of side effects. You know what the package insert is this is the written material that you get with your prescription medication. So you open up the little bag, there’s the bottle of pills. Brad (19m 28s): And they fine print. The package insert says may cause vomiting, bloating, dizziness, nausea, right? So all prescription drugs, of course, come with profound side effects and the same is true for consuming plants. And so if you have some sensitivities to where these plant toxins might overwhelm your immune response and trigger an auto-immune response or trigger an inflammatory response, most probably, or most likely because you have a dysfunctional gut health, you have leaky gut syndrome. And so unwanted agents drift into the bloodstream and your body mounts, an auto immune response against those wonderful agents that you just ingested antioxidants, polyphenols, flavanoids, the lycopene in the tomatoes and pomegranates that help protect against prostate cancer, all that kind of stuff. Brad (20m 19s): It could overwhelm you. Now, if you have excellent gut health and you don’t have particular individual sensitivities to certain foods, of course they can deliver the touted benefits that we’ve read for our entire life. So your broccoli, your Brussels sprouts, your leafy greens, your devoted consumption of nuts and seeds. All this stuff can boost your health, or it can take you down. And when we’re talking about going from level seven to level nine, we might want investigate even on a step-by-step basis, whether or not this purported benefits were accruing, all those, or they’re setting us back a bit. And when I talk about my, my salads and my stir fries and causing the leaky pipes and the digestive discomfort, who knows what it was causing in other areas of the body, in a subclinical level. Brad (21m 9s): Mark Sisson and their very first book, Primal Blueprint, he talks about how at the age of 40, he was experiencing arthritis in the hands that was affecting his golf game and smashing his dreams of preparing for the PGA senior tour. Just kidding on the latter part, but dead serious on the first part of the sentence that he was suffering from a significant arthritic condition, even as a young healthy guy. And as soon as he ditched grains, all these lifelong digestive disturbances went away, the arthritis subsided, and there’s hundreds of thousands, maybe even now we’re up to a million now of people who have entered the ancestral health world and experienced amazing health breakthroughs, not only from, you know, ditching grains, sugars, refined vegetable oils for the most part, but also going a little bit further investigating even further. Brad (21m 57s): So we can all agree like gluten is the most common and problematic lectin. That’s a form of poison that’s contained in lectins or a group of toxins, gluten being a form of lectin that’s found in modern day wheat product, right? So we can all nod our heads and validate how a gluten intolerance gluten sensitivity is widely suffered from. We all know what it’s like to have a peanut, Oh, no, someone with a peanut allergy and how serious that can be same with allergies to casein, protein and dairy products, but what’s not as obvious are the oxalates in your wonderful spinach salad that you’ve eaten your entire life and can cause some minor disturbances as part of the package insert of side effects. Brad (22m 44s): I really enjoyed Dr. Casey Means take care during our podcast interview, where she talked about the concept of redundant pathways. The term means that you can get a similar health benefit in different ways. Dr. Casey, go back and listen to her show. She’s the co-founder of Levels Health, which is continuous glucose monitor technology and app gets you on the highest level of self quantification, checking how various lifestyle habits affect your blood glucose in real time. So this redundant pathway concept, let’s give a nice quote here from Dr. Casey, for example, we can encourage autophagy, which is that helpful process of cleaning up old cells and proteins through increased sear two in gene expression, this increased gene expression can be activated by a number of different mechanisms, including hyperthermia, taking a sauna, calorie deprivation, such as fasting, cold thermogenesis, exercise, optimize circadian rhythms, and intake of plant polyphenols. Brad (23m 51s): So while some of you might want to go take an ice bath, Oh my gosh. Imagine that. Another person might choose to up their quercetin and resveratrol intake through plant foods end quote. So Dr. Casey chooses to live her life eating in a ketogenic vegan pattern, and she’s acknowledged that she’s tested and refined her eating patterns over time. Very carefully to be sure that her diet is a winner rather than a chronic stressor. So you’re strongly encouraged to do the same with your own food choices, including perhaps a period of extreme restriction to kind of get you to a sensible baseline where you can do some problem solving and some adding and subtracting and seeing how things affect your health. Brad (24m 38s): And the probably the most valid baseline is to eat in a carnivore pattern. Perhaps they strict carnivore experiment for 30 days if you’re suffering from autoimmune or inflammatory conditions. So even Dr. Casey, who’s on the opposite end of the spectrum being a vegan, she supports the carnivore rationale by observing that the antioxidant boost we get from broccoli and berries can also be had by the cold plunge. And Dr. Paul has some good video content where he talks about the concept of environmental hormesis versus dietary hormesis. So the word hormesis implies a, a brief positive, brief stressor that delivers a net positive benefit, a hormetic stressor. Brad (25m 24s): So it’s the Goldilocks just enough, right? So a sauna is a great example of a hormetic stressor. A sprint workout, or a weight training workout, where you’re putting your body under resistance load in an appropriate way, not destroying yourself, but doing a nice session where you challenge yourself through exercise as a hormetic stressor. So it was the cold plunge. And so is consuming these plant toxins and mounting a desirable or an optimal antioxidant defense response. So you can get dietary hormesis and or environmental hormesis. So you look at Dr. Paul and his Instagram, and he’s going into the cold bath and talking about all the different ways for environmental hormesis, to the extent that maybe you can put dietary hormesis aside and prioritize the other stuff. Brad (26m 14s): So speaking of hormesis, fasting is one of the greatest, right? It’s pretty much undisputed that the antioxidant immune boosting and cellular repair response to fasting is vastly more powerful than anything you can get from the greatest super food, acai bowl, fresh freshly squeezed wheat grass, and super juice smoothie, right? So for me, this is really a relief because I’ve been on this quest to help optimize and diet optimize my whole adult life. But knowing that a starting point of skipping a meal is going to beat anything, you can concoct the greatest and most colorful salad of all time, the best super nutrition, $9 super juice at the, the local healthy organic juice bar, knowing that the merely not eating is going to help you fight cancer better, prevent cancer, better boost immune function, get a nice antioxidant boost from fasting, slow down the aging process, all that great stuff. Brad (27m 19s): That should be a way to help you sleep better at night. You don’t have to stress about it. And skipping meals is going to be a nice hormetic stressor. Just as a quick aside there, I mentioned the other ones, right? So if you’re doing a sprint workout, taking a cold plunge and fasting and going into sauna and believe me, I’ve done all four of those on a single day. It’s possible that you can overload on the hormesis on the hormetic stressors and then turn into a stressful event. Obviously, if I were to go in my chest freezer or go in Lake Tahoe here in the winter time with 42 degree Fahrenheit, current water temperature, I go in there for, I don’t know, four or five or six minutes. Brad (28m 2s): If I were to go in for 20 minutes, I would be in deep trouble if not dead. So that would make the hormetic stressor adverse, right? So overdoing it. And just, that was just my personal insight that sometimes if I’m too aggressive with fasting, sprint workouts, cold plunge, sauna, it could be too much. And I probably should go down and sit down and have a nice meal, but fasting beats any super food, good takeaway there. And boy, the power of this, I think we’re just scratching the surface, especially when it comes to enhanced athletic performance. And who knows maybe someday fighting cancer through a fasting protocol or a ketogenic eating protocol. They’re already doing great stuff over there at the paleo, the paleo Paleo Medicina Clinic in Hungary. Brad (28m 48s): Cate Shanahan talked about that on our interview. I believe the title was How to Avoid Cancer. It’s on YouTube, it’s on the podcast channel. And she said, she said, if she got a diagnosis of cancer tomorrow, horrors tragedy, what would she do? And she said, I’d watch it for awhile. That’s exactly what she said. In other words, don’t perform these aggressive invasive treatments that a throw off all manner of healthy function when you get chemo and radiation, but she just monitor it for a while. Keep an eye on that cancer growing in your body. Can you do it? I don’t know, man. I’d have to take a deep breath, but I would be extremely enthusiastic about heading over to cutting edge treatments like this place. Brad (29m 29s): That’s doing great work in Hungary, the Paleo Medecina Clinic. We’ll put the link in the show notes if you’re interested and remind me in case, I forget if I get cancer 10 years from now what I said on the show. Okay, thanks. Appreciate it. And listeners, but anyway, scratching the surface, not only in healing and medicine, but also in athletic performance. Remember my anecdote from Dude Spellings. We related this in the recent book, Two Meals a Day. Think I’ve talked about it on the podcast, but he was doing an experimental super-duper ketogenic fat fueled athletic effort of doing the epic rim to rim, to rim crossing in the great Grand Canyon. Brad (30m 9s): So you go from the south rim down to the bottom, up to the north rim, I assume, touch the ranger station high five, and then go back down to the bottom and back out. A lot of people do it as a camping scene. They camp out on the north rim, go back the next day, like sensible humans. But Dude in his crew were doing it like the runners, they ultra endurance thing. So they did the whole thing in 13 hours. It’s about 50, 50 miles with like 12,000 or more. No, it must be 25,000 feet of vertical. And he tried to do the whole thing fasting. And all he consumed was some coconut butter at one point, got to the finish line and his supporters there had showed up to meet the running group with a nice big box of steaming hot pizzas. Brad (30m 53s): But instead Dude decided to retire to his tent and fast for another 10 hours overnight in the interest of speeding up recovery. Because we know when you’re in that fasted state, you have better cell repair, you have better immune function and better inflammation control. And he says, he woke up the next morning and he was less stiff and sore than on his previous crossing when he was 13 years younger. He did this one when he was 49. So that’s a, a nice young, healthy guy at age 36. And they also went quicker in the most recent crossing. So that is a glimpse to the future of athletic performance and recovery. Brad (31m 34s): Same with Zach Bitter, the world record holder in the a hundred mile run, he threw down a six hour and 40 minute performance. I believe it was 2019 or 2020. And for reference point, that is a sub three hour marathon back to back to back to back mind blowing. And he uses the carnivores ish ketogenic eating pattern, especially when he’s in training to kind of monitor or reduce that inflammation. And he notices, for example, the day after a long run, he wakes up and his ankles are less sore and stiff because his diet is less inflammatory and more nutrient dense. He’s got a great podcast, Human Performance Outliers I’ve been on there. Brad (32m 17s): You can listen to our show and check out some of his other content there, especially if you’re into that ultra endurance training scene. So more quoting from Paul. He says, look, our ancestors did eat plants. Of course were omnivores, but only when meat and organs were scarce. And it was as a survival mechanism or the plants were consumed in very small quantities as medicine end quote, Hey, this is a pretty wild insight. It kind of throws the, the basic assumption, the blanket assumption that humans are omnivores and meant to eat all this different stuff. It kind of puts that at calls that into question, and that’s a fundamental assumption of anthropology and genetic science, right? Brad (33m 0s): So it’s, it’s assured that we’re omnivores. We know that there’s no disputing that that’s unlike your wonderful pet, your dog, which descends from the wolf and the dog is a true carnivore. So your dog should be eating only animals and very minimal plants, if any. And none of that nasty kibble, especially in the kind of kibble that contains grains. Anyway, back to humans, this contention advanced by Dr. Saladino and also Dr. Sean Baker, that plants are merely survival foods rather than a basis of the human diet and that they might’ve been only consumed or mainly consumed when hunting wasn’t successful kind of trips you out a little bit. Brad (33m 43s): I love Sean Baker’s at the quote. We use this in the promo material for the incredible book, Carnivore Cooking for Cool Dudes, check it out on Amazon. You will laugh and you will get some great meals too. He said, look, if our ancestral clan was able to take down a wooly mammoth, they would have 3 million calories at their disposal that would feed everyone for weeks or maybe months without having to go look for a scrub around for hunting and gathering plant foods. So it’s also without dispute that the animal foods are vastly more nutrient dense than the plant foods in that category. You know, we’ve been hit with these insights that carrots and the orange and yellow family have a lot of beta carotene, which is great for your eyesight. Brad (34m 29s): But as Paul points out converting that beta carotene into the usable form of vitamin A that’s really good for the eyes requires a complex chain of chemical reactions. It’s 21 times more complex to convert the beta carotene into a usable form of vitamin A as it would be by comparison to have a slice of liver that has extremely high amounts of vitamin a in its fully formed and usable form because it’s coming from an animal source rather than a plant source. The term for that is retinol. So you have beta carotene precursor for vitamin A and then you have retinol the fully formed vitamin A. Liver has 700% of the RDA for vitamin A. Brad (35m 13s): That would be a lot of carrots to, to be equivalent. So here’s Dr. Paul’s list. If you’re interested in trying out this carnivore ish experiment. The main things to avoid in order of these are the most offensive or the most potentially toxic plant foods, nuts, seeds, legumes, grains, and leaves. That would be kale, spinach, Swiss, chard, et cetera. Dang, son, where does that leave? Brad’s Macadamia Masterpiece. I’m promoting a beautiful nut butter blend product. Well, guess what? I eat sensible amounts. I don’t live on this stuff and whatever I do eat, and I have eaten, I would say, larger quantities when I was in that experimental phase and the kitchen and slam and that stuff every day, but I would report zero adverse effects. Brad (36m 1s): So that’s my rationale for enjoying this sensible treat of Brad’s Macadamia Masterpiece. And guess what? It’s a nine ounce jar, small jar, and it sells for 16 or 17 bucks because of the premium ingredients inside the coconut butter, the macadamia nut butter. So this would be a decadent treat, well chosen at times. And one spoonful is going to sustain you for a four hour hike. I promised Mia Moore andI have experimented many times. So if you are sensitive to nuts, then you don’t want to eat those. And you take that top five list of things to avoid. That’s certainly a good starting point for the first 30 days. And then here are some plant foods that are less offensive. Brad (36m 42s): So as Paul lists them one through five sweet fruit in season, the berries and things like that, and in season is an important point. I really appreciate Dr. David Perlmutter bestselling author one of the leaders in the space recommending that we don’t consume any fruit in the winter months because it’s counter to our ancestral experience where we would go long periods of time without having anything ripe to consume in that category. Number two on Paul’s list is honey. And he’s been touting this with more enthusiasm lately, and he’s been testing with his continuous glucose monitor. And I believe he came out of a, he spun out of a period of at least 18 months of extremely strict carnivores. Brad (37m 24s): So he did not consume any plant food, hardly any carbs whatsoever. And he realized like some other people have contended over time. I know Robb Wolf talked about this on the Joe Rogan podcast that you can get what’s called metabolic insulin resistance from adhering to a strict, low carbohydrate diet for a long period of time. So you’re producing so little insulin because you’re not consuming carbs, that your body becomes a little bit desensitized to the insulin signaling. And it’s good to kind of do a tune-up now and then in other words, dose yourself with carbohydrates now and then, so your body remembers what to do with them and keeps those muscles flexed. Does that make sense? Right. Brad (38m 4s): So Paul is going for his doses of honey, especially as he pursues athletic goals and needs to replenish glycogen. So third on the list, squashes, avocados, or olives again, if you can tolerate them, but these are the low toxin type of plants. Also suggesting that it’s okay to consume white rice because they has white rice has really minimal toxins. A lot of people want to include that in their diet have to cook it in a pressure cooker cause that’ll neutralize whatever the leftover toxins are in there and then cucumbers without the skin and seeds. Okay. So there’s a list of stuff that you can throw in. Brad (38m 46s): I also did that recent podcast, What’s Brad’s Diet like These Days, and I enlisted painstakingly all the different stuff that’s leaking into my diet that’s in the plant kingdom or the indulgence list. And so I get well more than that top five list, but I have had some periods of time where you could say we’re strict carnivore just to monitor and realize that things like my own nut butter weren’t problematic, and then other stuff making into the picture. Maybe I’ll quickly hit those bullet points again, in case you didn’t listen to the other show. Yes. Here’s a quick list of some of my survival foods. Number one on the list, tons of 80% or higher dark chocolate. Brad (39m 28s): I’m loving the Akinosie 88 percent bar these days. And yeah, I can hit that stuff pretty hard. I also enjoy eating lots of avocados. One of the least objectionable plants are, as you notice on the list and also sweet potatoes, I’ll put those in my oxtail stew a once in a while, get some sweet potato fries from the local pub because they’re so fantastic even though they’re probably cooked an oil. Bad deal and then maybe eating the sweet potato roasted in the oven. We’ll go for a lot of squash in the winter time when it’s ripe. I also like to use canned sun dried tomatoes in a whole bunch of different recipes. I don’t know. They just seem to work with eggs or steak, whatever. I’m also kind of drifting in more of these little baby corn tortillas. Brad (40m 11s): They’re like the, a street taco size corn tortillas. And I’ll fry those up in olive oil or butter. Get them a little crispy and delicious with eggs or even steak inside. I’ve been hitting some raw honey with the actual honeycomb because of Paul’s enthusiasm and trying that especially cause I want to recover from my high intensity workouts as smoothly as possible, especially in my age group. And so sometimes I’m thinking that increased carbohydrate intake in the aftermath of these high intensity workouts can help me can benefit me, can make it less of a stressor, right? Once in a while, some popcorn with heavy butter and heavy olive oil on there, I’m a master at making it heavy salt too, but really trying, as you heard from my podcast titled the Fatty Popcorn Boy saga, trying to keep this in the treat category rather than a daily mindless habit. Brad (41m 9s): I had some cheesecake on my birthday. I talked about, I made this paleo pumpkin pie. You can see the ingredients, the recipe on my Instagram. I found this vanilla yogurt called St. oit. Delicious. And usually I get plain yogurt without flavor, but this has a nice soft taste of vanilla, not too sweet. Sometimes I’ll make a protein smoothie. The base is coconut milk and I’ll even throw some frozen bananas in there and throw a bunch of other powders and cool supplements. I use creatine, glutamine, collagen and some electrolyte mix. If I’m hungry, when I go shopping, sometimes in my bag will find its way to those sesame blue chips or those red hot blue chips and then a tub of guacamole. Brad (41m 52s): And I’ll hit that. So that’s a rare occasion. I would say. I’m not a frequent shopper for the blue corn chips, but yeah, darn those are pretty good. Especially when you don’t eat them that much. You really appreciate them. And I’ll cook a little bit of veggies sometimes as a meal accoutrements. So the onions might be in the pan if I’m cooking steak or certain other recipe, or if someone serves me something Mia Moore’s really good at making asparagus. So I’m not going out of my way to be an asparagus eater anymore, but if it’s served on my plate, of course I’ll eat it. And I don’t have huge adverse effects from occasional plant intake, but maybe a different story when I was pounding the stir fries every single day. Brad (42m 34s): But I’m definitely on that game of consuming zero fruit in the winter. And then in the summer, if I can find some great berries at the farmer’s market, I’m just exclusive and selective because I don’t want these things to just be automatic default. Again, I’m trying to adhere to the Carnivores Score Chart and focus on the most nutrient dense foods like the frozen liver liver cubes that I will slice up. I’ll follow the liver just enough to slice it. I’ll make these little cubes and then I’ll put them back in a glass container in the freezer. And so I can grab a handful of frozen liver cubes, salt them heavily. And those are the kinds of things that will be go to, I wouldn’t call it a snack cause they used to try to do it around mealtime and only ate two meals a day. Brad (43m 16s): Right. Right. But that’s kind of replacing the absent-minded consumption of blue corn chips because they’re always in the house. Right.? Okay. So that was my list. And Paul gave you his top five lists of fruit. I mean, carbs that you can add in if you desire. And then he gave a little more detail on his newsletter about what his eating patterns are. He’s eating two meals a day. Hey, I heard there was a great book by the same name. He goes for breakfast in the morning and then another meal in the late afternoon, but pretty darn early in the day for most people’s liking. But he’s going for trying to go level seven and level nine. Brad (43m 57s): Bone broth is in the scene. He makes it himself. 170 grams of protein for a athletic human weighing, 170 pounds. So one gram per pound of total body weight. And that’s a little bit higher than the long standing recommendations of people. But guess what? Now the, the door is opening where people are second guessing these veiled warnings about, Oh, consuming too much protein can be bad. And now, especially for the healthy, active athletic population, you could see these recommendations going up, Paul, going a gram per pound of total body weight. A lot of times you hear protein recommendations calculated on lean body mass. So you’d have to take off a 15 or 12 or 20% of the total and that’s quite a bit lower. Brad (44m 43s): So he’s going gram per pound, also consuming two to three ounces of raw organ meat. And of course the precious supplements that he makes and also Ancestral Supplements is putting out to so many interested consumers, a lot of fat in the diet, 80 to 110 grams of fat. And then in small amounts consuming that honey also dates. And I believe that’s mainly for improving insulin sensitivity and recovering from strenuous exercise. Okay. So in conclusion, we’re talking about going from level seven to level nine and enhancing the nutrient density of your diet, especially if you are interested in dropping excess body fat. Brad (45m 27s): I think the carnivore experiment is worth a go because what’s going to happen is you’re going to be incredibly satiated because everything you eating has a good amount of nutrient density and very high satiety, right? It’s known that protein has a even higher satiety level than fat. So if you’re eating these animal foods like an egg. That’s high in protein, high in fat, you’re going to feel fantastic. Tell me about any time that you’ve overdosed on eggs and felt terrible after, in comparison to overdosing on popcorn or chips or ice cream. Okay. So you’re getting all automatically this extremely high satiety diet, it’s going to be automatically low in carbohydrate and you’re going to start kickstarting, turbocharging, your burning of stored body fat. Brad (46m 13s): So I love that aspect besides the plant toxicity concerns. Even if it report nothing, no problem. You can eat anything. You have an iron stomach. A lot of people are interested in dropping excess body fat. And I believe this is the easiest and best way to do it. That’s why I think it’s going to continue to explode in popularity. Hopefully it doesn’t get distorted like the keto scene where people are misinterpreting and misappropriating the spirit of the ketogenic diet because of the popularity, I guess. So doing it right and going for that weight loss goal is a big deal. And so is the, the nutrient intensity, the nutrient density of your diet and trying to up your game there. Brad (46m 53s): I remember when I was heartbroken and stunned that years into eating in the primal pattern and ditching all the bad stuff out of my diet and having my, my steaks and my eggs and plenty of vegetables and fruit and all that great stuff. And then being exposed to the work of Dr. Cate Shanahan in her bestselling book, Deep Nutrition, where she’s talking about these four pillars of human ancestral nutrition and the four categories were fresh foods. So your fruits, your vegetables, second was fermented foods. So that category of sauerkraut, kimchi, yogurt, kombucha, the third pillar was organ meats. Brad (47m 34s): And the fourth one was meat on the bone. So you can get your collagen and your glycosaminoglycans and things that are not found in any other foods or very little. And I realized that I was basically striking out on three of the four categories. Of course I was eating a lot of fresh foods, very little fermented foods, maybe once in a while, I’d have some yogurt or a kombucha, hardly any organ meats at all. And then meat on the bone, you know, once in a while you have a ribeye, but mostly I’m eating steaks and hamburgers and chicken and turkey. So this work of Cate inspired me to up my game and go looking for foods in those other categories. And especially in recent times, thanks to the really extreme guys like Saladino and Brian “Liver King “Johnson, the founder of Ancestral Supplements. Brad (48m 23s): They’ve inspired me to up my liver game in particular, in my overall organ meat consumption. So I’m making these wonderful oxtail stews finding that that’s the tail of the cow it’s called oxtail. You can find it at a good butcher and ordering up things like heart and kidney from US Wellness Meats. Sometimes I find tongue at the butcher Whole Foods once in a while. And if you put that thing in a crock pot and cook it for eight hours, Oh my gosh, it’s delicious. The meat just peels off and you have yourself, a nice base for a taco. Bone broth again, is that really special dietary category. Brad (49m 3s): That’s really hard to address with other foods because you’re getting that connective tissue in a good bone broth, right, to be distinguished from the cartons of what should be called chicken or beef stock rather than the proper bone broth, which is gelatinous when it’s cold. And then it heats up into liquid. There’s so many good purveyors. You can find in the quality markets. I like Bonafide Provisions, because they make all these exotic flavors like tomato flavored, bone broth, and they make it out of chicken and beef. And you can find some other good brands out there as well, or make it your own by buying the joint material, the knuckles from the butcher and going on a 48 hour simmer on the crock pot. And I also like the great suggestion from Matt Whitmore of Fitter Food.Check him out on Instagram. Brad (49m 48s): He’s a fitness machine, as well as a dietary expert with his wife. Keris Marsden. He told me to drop a few egg yolks into my morning mug of bone broth. And boy, is that a food? Okay. There’s a nice summary of enhancing the nutrient density of your diet, keeping an open mind and thinking critically about this carnivore movement and maybe partaking in some experimental time, especially to determine your sensitivity to plant toxins and overall to focus on enhanced nutrient density of the diet, drop some excess body fat while you’re at it. Please print out my carnivores scores chart. That was a great project with Kate Cressinger, put it on your fridge and try to go for the most nutrient dense foods on the planet as your dietary emphasis. Brad (50m 35s): Thank you so much for listening. Send some comments we’d love to hear from you podcast@bradventures.com. Share this show with others, right? Most podcast players, you can push a little button up there to share a link and your friends who are out of the loop can join in and up their overall game from level seven to level nine and beyond. Thanks for that. Listening. Thank you for listening to the show. So I love sharing the experience with you and greatly appreciate your support please. Email podcast@bradventures.com with feedback, suggestions, and questions for the QA shows, subscribe to our email list of Brad kearns.com for a weekly blast about the published episodes and a wonderful buy monthly newsletter edition with informative articles and practical tips for all aspects of healthy living. Brad (51m 28s): You can also download several awesome free eBooks when you subscribe to the email list. And if you could go to the trouble to leave a five or five star review with Apple podcasts or wherever else, you listen to the shows that would be super, incredibly awesome. It helps raise the profile of the B.Rad podcast and attract new listeners. And did you know that you can share a show with a friend or loved one by just hitting a few buttons in your player and firing off a text message? My awesome podcast player called overcast allows you to actually record a soundbite excerpt from the episode you’re listening to and fire it off with a quick text message. Thank you so much. Brad (52m 8s): Spread the word, and remember Be Rad!

 

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Jeff Kahn and The Sleep Placebo Effect, Wimp Factor, and Individual Differences

(Breather) I had such a great time speaking to sleep expert Jeff Kahn that we kept the mic running well after our first conversation was technically over, and it turned into quite a fascinating conversation. 

In this breather show, you’ll learn about the “sleep placebo effect” and why some people are actually more affected by their sleep debt than others are. You’ll also learn about the many different ways to measure sleep quality (there are eight!), and how to effectively deal with, and eradicate, the distracting thoughts that can come flooding in right before bedtime. 

You’ll also learn about why “stimulus control” is actually the best, research-backed way to reverse insomnia, and why it’s so important to do whatever you can to not stress about your sleeping patterns when you’re having trouble sleeping through the night or even falling asleep. Enjoy learning even more from this incredible sleep expert, and check out Rise here.

TIMESTAMPS:

If we happen to have a night of imperfect sleep, maybe don’t worry about it. [01:30]

Individuals have different sensitivities to sleep debt. [03:48]

Sleep placebo is that if you are told that whatever sleep you got last night was good quality, you actually perform better. [06:28]

There are about eight different measures of sleep quality, and still, it is hard to define. [07:57]

If you are having trouble with thoughts when you are trying to fall asleep, it’s a good idea to write things down or get out of bed and do something else. [10:26]

If we are in sleep debt and really needing sleep, are we going to get a deeper more efficient sleep? [13:11]

Don’t stress about your imperfect night of sleep. [18:31]

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B.rad Podcast

Brad (1m 30s): Oh, I love the kind of breathers shows that emanate from keeping the mic on after a formal interview show is over. And that is just what you’re going to get with sleep expert. Jeff Khan, we had a wonderful show, so many amazing insights it ended or near the end. I asked my question about the wimp factor because I’m such a little whiskey boy when I don’t get my sleep and I feel so bad and I’m cranky about it the next day. And I have to take a nap or even a second nap and everything’s going to be perfect. And then meanwhile, Mia Moore, she’s like a machine. She can go operate just fine on an extremely diminished night asleep and then just sleep hard the next night. Brad (2m 11s): So we sort out some of these insights and notions that we harbor about sleep again with Jeff pointing to the science and really helping to cut through some of the misinformation or the misunderstandings that are out there. So in regard to the wimp factor that I asked him about, he actually mentioned two things. There is such a thing known as the sleep placebo effect, and maybe we can consider this and leverage it a little bit and change our attitude. If we happen to have a night of imperfect sleep or a period of time of imperfect sleep, maybe not worry about it. Especially people that have minor insomnia, the actual instruction is to get up out of bed. Brad (2m 55s): The second thing he mentioned was that we indeed have individual differences and sensitivities to missing sleep and how we function the following day. So we have to definitely be vigilant about that and kind of over time, especially as we’re using his Rise app, we can track the level of sleep debt and what correlates to behavior changes during the day. So we know that we’re getting in trouble. If we’ve two or three or four hours of sleep debt accumulated from the previous week or two weeks. So you’re going to get a lot of cool insights. And of course, in a casual format off the cuff conversation, after that wonderful interview show, which I hope you’ll listen to the whole thing in its entirety, and then piggyback this little breather show. Brad (3m 45s): Jeff Kahn, here we go with more sensitivity to sleep loss. Jeff (3m 49s): So they’re sort of with sleep debt. What makes it even a bit more complex is that depending on the active activity, you’re doing different people have different sensitivities to sleep. So you and I, both Brad might have six hours, but your athletic performance might be more affected than mine. For example, even what’d you call it the Brad (4m 11s): Sleep placebo effect and what’s the second one. Jeff (4m 13s): So this one is just a, they call it like inter individual differences with sleep debt that we might have different sensitivities to sleep debt. So we both might have six hours, but for me, I may be I’m my, my physiological performance may be much more impacted than yours is six hours. Brad (4m 37s): Oh, this is great. Or, you know, we both might have six hours sleep debt. And my metabolism might only be down 18% and yours is down, you know, 38%. So it’s significant, You know, the methylation of the chemicals, the hormones and neurotransmitters and all those things are, you know, clearly off. And in my case, I can attest to it that I’m just, I’m just not right. And then my partner, Mia Moore, she’s like a, she’s like a robot she’s I know she’s on the low end of that standard deviation because she wakes up and feels fantastic with, you know, an abbreviated night asleep and has really no ill effects. You can’t see any decline. Jeff (5m 17s): she’s alert and she’s awake, Brad (5m 20s): Happy, smiling, not anxious, like the 50% of the people. Jeff (5m 24s): Exactly. And the other study. So she’s probably lower sleep need. And I wouldn’t be, it would be totally normal for you to need nine hours every night. Oh, for sure. Yeah. And that wouldn’t be, if you said I need nine hours or now you’d be like, yeah, like, and there’s some people that are six foot one, like that’s not six nine. So the sleep placebo effect is the last one that will, I can share with you, which is we’re rolling, dude. This is a show right here. And this is too good. Is this like a reprise reprise or a prize? Brad (5m 56s): However, we say that word, I have these breather shows That are, you know, shorter and kind of followups to the full length interviews. So this is, this is too precious to not record. So I’m I’m and listeners, you might’ve missed right before I hit record, I said, I said, Jeff, I’m really concerned about this wimp effect. And I always think about it, like, do I just need to get out of bed and rally? Or am I really one of these people that, you know, the individual sensitivity you just explained? And then, then the placebo effect, I’m going to fasten my seatbelt here. I don’t know if I want to hit the answer or not. Jeff (6m 28s): So, so this is a great one, but there was a study done and they had two groups of people. One of the groups, they said they had them get the same amount of sleep each night. I forget if it was six hours or eight hours. But they basically said regardless of the amount of sleep that they got one group, they told them that they got a very high quality sleep and had more REM than usual. The other thing, right, when they woke up, Hey, we’ve measured your sleep. You have way more quality sleep. You had higher REM than usual. The other group, they told the opposite. And what did they find? So what they were measuring actually was that psychomotor, vigilance task, like it’s this reaction time test that you can’t learn. And it turns out that the group that they told that had quote, unquote, better sleep quality and performing better, even though objectively, there was no difference in the amount of sleep they had. Jeff (7m 15s): And so that’s what, that’s what the sleep placebo effect is that if you are told that whatever sleep you got last night happened to be high quality, you will actually perform better. So, so that’s just kind of crazy that it does affect what you think happened. Certainly affects how you objectively perform and it’s worth considering when you wake up that again, don’t delay your judgment. Talk, think about sleep debt, not about quality, you know, quality. There is no measure for sleep quality. Like you ask a sleep scientist, what sleep quality. They’ll tell you. I have no idea what sleep goal. Wow. Yeah. So Jimmy’s Asher was on a Brad (7m 55s): Analyzer bits of apps, man. Yeah. Jeff (7m 57s): Jamie’s sites are who’s on the, he he’s one of the top circadian scientists sleep scientists in the world and just he’s over at Stanford. And one of the top scientists there, he was on a podcast recently and he’s helped on a bunch of stuff that we’ve done. And I love this sign. This is the host asked him about sleep quality. He said, I have no idea what sleep quality is. And this is like one of the top people. Well, that’s a problem. That’s a problem. Yeah. And the, the sort of more nuanced answer is sleep. Science does have a thing called sleep quality. It’s a high level construct. And there are, you know, about eight different measures of sleep quality. So one measure is when someone wakes up, you asked them, how do you feel inside? Jeff (8m 40s): Another measure is something called sleep efficiency where you measure of the time someone was in bed, what percent of the time were they sleeping? That’s another measure, but you know, there’s so many of these different measures where it’s like, it’s not like there is a thing called sleep quality that is objective in any way. And so don’t worry about that. If you are super, if you’re really restless, unless you’re up in the middle of the night, the reason you feel bad the next day is it because your sleep quality was bad. It’s because you had high sleep debt because you didn’t get as much actual physiological sleep. So as long as you are asleep, you’re doing what you need to be doing so long as you’re not under the influence of external substances or, you know, your sleep disorder, you know, anything kind of long tail like that. Jeff (9m 30s): So, Brad (9m 30s): And I guess a fitful night of sleep is going to be driven by emotional disturbances. Otherwise, when we, when we go to bed, we’re going to sleep unless we get in our own way, I suppose. Jeff (9m 45s): Yeah. In some ways I’m happy to drop a couple things that have worked really well for that. I mean, it’s super common, first of all, to, to have, you know, disturbed sleep, to not be able to fall asleep easily at night. And it’s nothing to worry about. First of all, it’s actually normal to, to have, you know, these sort of intermittent issues. If it’s happening very regularly, you know, like it’s three times a week, every week, you know, every month, that’s something you should bring up with your physician and see if you can spend some time with a behavioral sleep medicine specialist. That’s what is known as insomnia, which is again, just sort of this general categorization of I have difficulty sleeping or staying asleep. Jeff (10m 26s): So there are some really great ways to reverse that, which we won’t talk about now. But, but if you are having just sort of like, Oh my mind’s racing or, Oh, I woke up in the middle of the night. Like just some, I’d say two very kind of research backed approaches. That one is, can you, if your mind is sort of active, just literally detailing or journaling, the things that are in your brain, just putting them down. Like I literally I’ll take out my phone. I’ll I have it on night mode. I have my orange glasses on, by the way, orange glasses, tons of great science behind them. I wear, I’ve worn them every night for the last, you know, six years of my life. I, so orange glasses are great. We can talk about that later too. Jeff (11m 6s): But literally I’ll just jot down the things to my brain and then I’ll go back to bed. And if I’m still, you know, I’m awake and it’s what I’m normally supposed to be sleeping. I actually get out of bed and go do something else, go watch TV, go, listen to podcasts, go hang out, go read tiI’m sleepy and I get back in bed. And that you want to just rinse and repeat that formula. So let’s say you wake up in the middle of the night and you can’t go back to, but you’re just wide awake. If your mind’s racing, jot that stuff down. If you’re still there, you’re like, you know, I’m just awake. Don’t give yourself any of our time about it. Get out of bed, go do something else that you’d like to do. And then when you’re ready to fall asleep and you’re sleeping again, get back in bed. And if you can’t, you don’t fall asleep, literally do the same thing again. Jeff (11m 47s): And that’s called stimulus control. And that is actually the way to reverse. It’s one best way to do it. But it’s, you know, anyway, if you have insomnia, you should do it with a behavioral sleep medicine specialist. But if you don’t, it’s just sort of, you’re looking for what to do. That is the sort of best research backed way to, you know, make sure that you’re falling asleep, staying asleep and again, with sleep debt one night of getting four hours sleep. Okay, that’s fine. You’ll be fine. Don’t you don’t need to worry about it. It actually happened to me yesterday. I had two hours of sleep debt and then I had just like a super fitful night. I was just, I woke up at 3:00 AM. I was just wide awake. So I got out of bed. Jeff (12m 28s): I watched Peaky Blinders. I wasn’t tired. And I think I went back to bed at like 6:00 AM and I got maybe another hour and a half of sleep for two hours of sleep. I think I got maybe five hours total. And so I ended up building up about three hours of sleep debt, but on top of my two, I only had five. So I still felt great that day. You know, I felt really weird the first 90 minutes, but I went out and did my run. I had my coffee started working and I felt, you know, all, all things equal. I felt really good. And then that night I was able to go back to sleep and I paid back, paid him down. And so anyway, it’s nothing to freak out about. Even people that have been studying this for years and years and years, it’s not about perfection. This stuff is a lifelong practice. Brad (13m 11s): What about this concept? That if we are in debt and really needing sleep, are we going to get a deeper more efficient sleep? And so it counts for more, even though it was still only eight hours, then a slightly, maybe had a couple of disturbances. You went up to pee a couple of times and re recall being restless for a little bit, versus just being out like a rock because you were so deprived? Jeff (13m 36s): Yeah. So your, your, your brain will self optimize that. And so you’ll actually get a higher percentage of REM earlier in the night, if you’re very sleep deprived and you’re re REM latency will decrease. So the amount of time it takes your brain to get into room, usually it takes a while cause you’re doing more deep sleep, but if you’re very deprived, you’ll see a higher percentage of REM sleep earlier in the night. And again, what we don’t really know what we know is this is happening, but we don’t really know is what it all means. Exactly. And the sleep staging stuff. Again, your brain is really self optimizing that for you. And if you’re not getting into the deep sleep, the benefit is your brain is doing things like encoding memory and emotion and getting your, you, you ready to be able to have empathy the next day? Jeff (14m 18s): Like, I mean, like all of these other things that are just fundamental to existing, so it’s sort of like hierarchy of needs. Yeah, yeah. Even in the lighter sleep, like wonderful things are happening. So it’s not like, Oh, I don’t want light sleeper. It’s inefficient sleep. That’s not the case. It’s just that it’s sort of, Maslow’s hierarchy of needs that if you cut your sleep really short, your brain is going to go to the things that you absolutely need to stay alive. And so in that case argue, we, I guess it’s more efficient, but as you get more and more sleep, as you pay back more and more debt, you’re going to start, your brain will spend more time in things that are sort of actually very important for today’s modern living that maybe weren’t as important when we were sort of hunting and gathering, Brad (14m 59s): Right. This reminds me of Dr. Sara Mednick’s book, Take a Nap, Change your Life. And she said, the nature of your nap is going to be what you’re deficient on. And so you might have a REM nap where you’re, you’re dreaming a lot, or you might have a rock solid, deep sleep nap, or you wake up and feel groggy. And I, people always report, you know, sometimes I take a nap and I wake up and feel super groggy. And other times I wake up and feel refreshed and alert and all that. And so that’s pretty interesting how that, that self optimization occurs. Jeff (15m 31s): Yeah. Yeah. And so that’s just something to be aware of and not trying to force it when right. Don’t worry about it. Yeah. Don’t worry about it. It’s not a thing to focus on. Brad (15m 39s): It’s probably what some of those apps are doing is trying to weight that more deep sleep means more efficient rather than fitful where you’re waking up from dreams where yeah. It’s completely off base from your, your true needs. Jeff (15m 57s): And it’s one, it’s one of the areas where I think Matt Walker and my opinion because of his expertise in sleep and memory, I mean, literally what the guy studies is, Hey, we’re going to selectively deprive people of different stages. And we’re looking at like mechanistically how memory gets encoded based on your sleep. And if we don’t get REM, you know, does this type of memory getting coded or not? So, I mean, like he’s super deep on that mechanism, but I think he’s getting lost in the details and the forest is that your brain self optimizing. So, you know, it’s not like the fact that you’re not getting deep means that you’re getting more of another stage. You’re getting more stage two. And obviously if you have a sleep disorder, you know, or you have, you know, a suboptimal sleep environment where, you know, you’re getting woken up unnecessarily, like then yes, like there’s things we should do, but it’s not inherently an area in my opinion, that as lay people, we should be focused on trying to do anything about. Jeff (16m 54s): And, and so, you know, a really great example of a company, I think doing something great in the space is Apple. They, you know, Apple watches the most popular wearable device. It has some of the most advanced sensors. They have some of the best technologists, some of the best R and D engineers. And if you look at their sleep tracking that they launched with watch OS seven, you’ll see that all they have is the amount of time you were sleeping. That’s all they report. Brad (17m 21s): How are they tracking that? Is it advanced or is it just that the watch was still not moving or? Jeff (17m 27s): They’re using motion, which is a technique called actigraphy. And then they use heart rate. And I don’t know any other data on that, but it’s sensor fusion stuff. But, but what they’re telling you is are you, were you awake or were you asleep? And they’re not telling you REM and sleep quality and deep sleep and how long it took you to fall asleep. And so the question is like, wait, what was as like, they didn’t do it, like look at all these apps, you know, like Fitbit’s doing it. And, you know, sleep cycles telling you how light or deeper sleep was and, you know, whatever, not, I love both of those brands, but what ends up happening is it’s gotten in the way of, it’s confusing to consumers. It’s ultimately not useful information. And, and so anyway, I applaud Apple for the deep scientific research they did and sticking to their guns from a product standpoint to say, we’re not going to include junk in our experience just because it’s gonna, you know, get people to look at it more often. Jeff (18m 21s): That’s not their business model, Brad (18m 24s): Deep research to do a shallow reporting of data. Love it. Jeff (18m 28s): Correct. Yeah. Yup. Brad (18m 31s): So this placebo, I’m wondering how to best leverage that. Like one of the things you said that’s really helpful is don’t stress about your imperfect night of sleep, in fact, get up and putz around. And so if you have less anxiety over your, your sleep perfection, that’s one. And I suppose if you just keep this calculation working your sleep debt, which you reported, obviously you’re, I guess, looking at the app and you always have a number in mind there, hopefully at zero, we know we can’t get into the plus column. You can’t oversleep, which is a really cool insight, but if you’re working on minus two or minus five or whatever, you just kind of have this idea in your mind that you’re going to grab that at some point. Brad (19m 11s): And it’s not, not huge trouble that you’re minus five. Jeff (19m 15s): Yeah. And you’ll feel, I think what’s exciting is once you start measuring it in your life, you’ll be like, Oh, okay. Like here’s how I feel at five. And then you’ll get up to 10 some days and be like, Oh wow. This is what I feel like when I’m at 10. Yeah. That’s why I’m like more anxious than usual. And I’m a little more depressed and I’m not as optimistic as I used to be. And my confidence has been where it used to be. Yeah. I’m not performing as well. Athletic, like you’ll feel at what it’s like at 10 15 and five and three and two. And so you’ll start to be like, Oh, I’m at five tomorrow. Fine. I have, my day, tomorrow is super challenging. I still feel good about, so, you know, for me at five, I can’t even, you know, the early afternoon dip, when you might feel like, you know, one o’clock, two o’clock, you might feel a little bit sleepy. Jeff (19m 57s): So at five, I don’t even feel that if I’m at five hours of sleep debt and when I’m at six or seven, I really feel it. And if I’m at eight, nine, 10, I’m like struggling to stay awake. I can’t focus. I mean, it’s like that whole chunk of my day is kind of gone. I actually don’t feel it as much Brad (20m 15s): Due to the individual differences. I might be the person that says, Hey, at two, I feel terrible. And I needed nap or I can’t function, which is just something to recognize and kind of relate to those numbers. Oh, I’m, I’m all over the Rise app, man. This is, this is great. Thanks for, thanks for sticking around for a breather show. We got, we have another rap, Jeff Kahn man. All right.

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Carnivore Scores Food Ranking Chart

(Breather) This episode is all about the Carnivore Scores Food Chart, a joint venture with Kate Cretsigner, a health coach who has seen the incredible effectiveness of the carnivore diet firsthand through countless clients, family members, and herself.

Kate began utilizing carnivore as a strategy and solution for healing for her clients who, while already eating a paleo or keto style diet, were still suffering from inflammatory conditions. Kate quickly realized that by cutting out all potentially problematic plant foods, their bodies were healing much more quickly, while also receiving the added benefit of optimal nutrients.

Kate actually started this carnivore experiment in her own home: with herself, but first with her daughter, who was able to experience incredible healing in just 30 days from diverticulitis. Since Kate never advises her clients to do something that she hasn’t done herself, she went strict carnivore for 30 days. After the first month, Kate found that assorted health imperfections that she didn’t know that dhr had, or that she had just written off as ‘normal’ had improved right away. Her 30-day experiment turned into 560 days and counting! And get this: during the early stages of her carnivore journey, she actually rode her bicycle the entire length of Vermont — that’s 200 miles over the course of two days — without consuming any calories on the bike! Talk about a fat-burning machine!

I loved hearing about the amazing work Kate has been doing with her clients, so I was even further excited at the idea of collaborating with her on a Carnivore Food Chart to simplify and clarify what this diet is all about. In this episode, I’m breaking down the chart to explain why we have formulated it this way, and you’ll learn how easy and simple it is to get optimal nutrition once you have this handy set of guidelines to reference! Everything is clearly laid and explained concisely as you’ll see in the graphic here, so print it out and put a copy on your fridge, reference it when you’re grocery shopping, and enjoy the surprising amount of variety and options included in this diet. 

Global All-Stars (the most nutrient dense foods on the planet)

Liver, Oysters, Salmon Roe and Caviar

Animal Organs

Liver, Bone Broth, Heart, Kidney, Sweetbread, Rocky Mountain Oysters, Tripe

Wild-Caught, Oily, Cold-Water Fish

Sardines, Mackerel, Anchovies, Salmon, Herring

Shellfish

Oysters, Clams, Crab, Lobster, Mussels, Octopus, Scallops

Eggs

Don’t forget other egg options like Goose, Duck, Quail, and Ostrich

Red Meat

Also try: Buffalo/Bison, Elk, Lamb, Venison

The rest of the foods included reside below The Steak Line, meaning everything listed above are the foods that offer maximum nutrient density. The rest of the foods listed are still healthy, but do not need to be emphasized in the same way because of their differences in nutritional profile: Chicken, Turkey, and Pork and Raw, Organic, High Fat Dairy.

And yes, some plant foods are still included on this list! They are:

Avocados

Dark chocolate

Fermented foods

Fruit

Honey

Nuts & nut butters

Seaweed

Sweet potatoes/squash

These (optional) plant foods were included because they still offer extremely high nutrient value (along with the smallest chance of digestive irritation). But, if you do currently suffer from digestive issues or any inflammatory conditions, try going Kate’s route by sticking to a strict carnivore approach for 30 days. After that, see how you feel, and re-asses if you feel comfortable slowly introducing a few plant foods back into your diet. Chances are, you’ll be feeling so great that the reintroduction of these nutritious plant foods should be no problem. 

If you want to see for yourself just how fun and easy it is to nourish your body with the most nutrient-dense food on the planet, click here to download the Carnivore Scores chart. 

TIMESTAMPS:

When the body is getting optimal nutrients, it heals quicker. It has better energy. You feel better. [03:00]

Kate is going to embark on a Trans America bike race on no carbs, no sugar and just meat, organs and fat.  [04:00]

There’s a lot of people out there suffering due to gut inflammation, leaky gut syndrome, and quite a lot of it can be righted with a complete restriction of plants and then a gradual reintroduction of the least offensive plants. [05:00]

A preponderance of animal foods, the most nutritional superfoods are listed. [07:00]

Wild caught oil cold-water fish is the best source for Omega 3s in the human diet. SMASH stands for sardines, mackerel, anchovies, salmon, and herring. [10:20]

Shellfish are next on the list, also a very good source of Omega three. [12:16]

Eggs are next on our go-to chart.  Always look for eggs that are locally grown or at least in a carton stating they are pasture raised and certified humane. [14:02]

There are still many foods listed on the chart that are good to eat, just not in the super food category. Grass-fed red meat is on this list. [17:20]

Down below the steak line on the chart are chicken, turkey, and pork. Of course, look for organic or pasture raised. [22:00]

You want to make a blanket commitment to avoid all manner of conventional pasteurized and low and non-fat dairy products [23:10]

If you want to include vegetables into your diet, listed on the chart are the least objectionable.  They can be integrated strategically into the diet.  [26:35]

And with dark chocolate, get the beans to bar notation and not made with child labor. [26:49]

Raw honey, avocado, and nuts, fermented foods, fruits, sweet potatoes and squash are discussed as well. [30:36]

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B.rad Podcast

Brad:

Greetings listeners. I am going to talk you through this wonderful carnivore
scores, food rankings chart. This has been a very rewarding joint venture
with the inspiration for the project, the original creator of this concept and
the early chart, KATE CRETSINGER of K 84 wellness. Check her out at K
the letter, K the number 8, the number 4 wellness.com. She is a huge
carnivore enthusiast. You&#39;re not going to believe the levels that she has
taken this dietary strategy to. But she&#39;s also a popular health coach in
Vermont and has used the carnivore restriction diet experiment with great
success to her clients. So I&#39;m going to quote her when she wrote me kind
of a summary, a recap of how this whole chart came to be and her brilliant
insight about eating above the steak line. So let me give you some
commentary from Kate when she was talking about how this chart and this
whole idea of doing a restrictive carnivore diet experiment with her clients
came to be quote: I started using this chart from my clients that would eat
paleo keto and still have inflammatory issues.
This chart was a guideline for them to get optimal nutrition while we took
everything else out of their nutritional intake, all the potentially problematic
plant foods. When the body is getting optimal, nutrients, it heals quicker. It
has better energy. You feel better. This was the elimination of elimination
diets. Some people did it for 30 days. Some did it for four months. It all
came down to healing the gut. Once my client&#39;s guts were healed, then we
would add things back to see where, and if they had any sensitivity, her
daughter was the first person that she got to try it. She had an assortment
of health issues that righted it very quickly. It was absolutely amazing in
just 30 days and amazing transformation from diverticulosis and all feeling
better, very quickly from eliminating all plant foods. And that&#39;s what her
inspiration to push this onto her clients was?
So her daughter was the Guinea pig. I&#39;ve never had my clients do
something that I haven&#39;t done myself. So I decided I was going to try
carnivore for 30 days. The symptoms that I didn&#39;t know I had, or that I
thought were normal healed that 30 days has turned into 545 days of
carnivore and counting during the early stages of my carnivore journey,
get this people. I rode the entire length of the great state of Vermont, 200
miles without eating any food. My body has become a fat burning
machine. My next big adventure is to do this crazy event called the Trans
American bike race 4,200 mile route with 250,000 feet in elevation gain.
So she&#39;s going to try to ride her bike across America on no carbs, no
sugar, just meat, organs, and fat in order to promote gut health. The race
is coming in June of 2021 best of luck to Kate on that note.
So when she was talking to me about this on a podcast, I was so
interested and we got further in and did some great research together and
came up with an extremely comprehensive chart, obviously geared toward

the carnivore enthusiasts because there&#39;s an a little category from, for
plant foods at the bottom where we present eight of the least offensive
plant foods that have good nutritional benefit, and don&#39;t have those high
objections of the most toxic plant foods.

So people that are not in this carnivore mindset are open to it might object.
I know there&#39;s some great lists of the most nutritious foods that you can
find from people like Dr. Axe, that talk about the great benefits of a
broccoli and the assorted known super foods from the plant kingdom. But
this is a whole different deal here. And what we found in the details and
the user experiences, there&#39;s a lot of people out there suffering due to gut
inflammation, leaky gut syndrome, as it&#39;s known, and quite a lot of it can
be righted with a complete restriction of plants and then a gradual re-
introduction of the least offensive plants.
So while there&#39;s a lot of nutritional benefits to be had from some of those
foods that you see landing high in the rankings frequently, for example, Dr.
Axe&#39;s top 30 most nutrient dense foods, a ripping through this thing and
skipping over the animal foods just to show you he puts things like
seaweed, kale, collards, broccolirob, spinach, watercress, rugala cabbage,
bell peppers, garlic, parsley, berries, asparagus carrots, beets, pumpkin
lentils, artichokes, tomatoes, wild mushrooms, and so on sweet potatoes,
wild rice, and granted these things have nutritional benefits and properties.
But we&#39;re going with the premise that Paul Saladino conveys so
appropriately on my shows with him that these foods come with, what&#39;s
the known in the prescription drug world as the package insert, that&#39;s the
piece of paper that comes with your prescription detailing all the potential
side effects. So the argument, the rationale here is that by eliminating
these foods that do have nutritional benefits, but may be irritating your
leaky gut, you can have that health awakening.
So as we look toward what are truly the most nutrient dense foods on the
planet, you&#39;re going to see a preponderance of animal foods. And that&#39;s
what this ranking chart is all about. And so we have in category, number
one, we call these the global all-stars, the world&#39;s most nutrient dense
foods. And there are three foods that make the top list here. Grass fed
liver, oysters, and salmon roe, and caviar. So fish eggs may be a nominee
for the most likely food that you would choose. If you were stuck on a
desert Island with only one food to eat for the rest of your life, oysters
have that reputation as being an aphrodisiac because they do promote
reproductive health and energetic function with their high levels of zinc
and B12. And of course, grass-fed liver, arguably the most nutrient dense
single food on the planet.

If you don&#39;t like the taste, maybe you can try slicing it raw, and just, just
enough thought to slice it. I slice it into small chunks after its frozen thaw it
out, and then I can just grab a chunk out of the freezer and it tastes much
better raw, heavily salted than it does for me. Anyway, when it&#39;s in that
rubbery state and a lot of people have a distaste to have that be a dietary
centerpiece, but the global all-stars liver, oysters, and salmon eggs, and
then the next category down is animal organs. So we have liver as the
centerpiece, and then also in this category, things that you can find pretty
easily from most butchers heart, kidney are the main ones. So if you can
go with liver, heart, and kidney and slice that stuff up and pan fry it and
have it be a regular part of your diet, or at least a nice side dish, that
would be really great.
And if you can find sweet bread, that&#39;s made from the famous gland,
Rocky Mountain oysters, that&#39;s the euphemism for testicles, and tripe is
the stomach lining. It&#39;s a popular ingredient in the Mexican soup menudo,
which I am fond of enjoying my mother-in-law makes that wonderfully. And
these are truly nutrient rich meals. And if your game is a little bit off, you
can, of course pound the organ supplements from ancestral
supplements.com, especially MOFO that&#39;s the compilation that&#39;s designed
to optimize male hormone function with the gathering of testicles, prostate,
liver, heart, and bone marrow in a single capsule form. So there&#39;s no
excuse not to be up on your organ consumption, even if you haven&#39;t been
down to the butcher lately to grab this stuff that most people think is gross
or out of their comfort zone. So get your capsules going, try to consume
some of the actual organs and expand your horizons, your dietary
horizons, or go with the capsules.
And also in that category, you could put a bone broth, which is a great
super food. You get agents in bone broth that are very hard to get in any
other area of the diet, namely collagen and glycosaminoglycan’s for joint
and connective tissue health and skin health.

So that is a great boost. I love this morning beverage of bone broth with
several egg yolks dumped inside and stirred together inspired by Matt
Whitmore of fitter food in England. Follow him on Instagram. He&#39;s got
great workouts with his girl, Caris Marston; the super fit couple of the
planet. So that super beverage hard to top that in the morning blows
coffee or anything else away, even a big smoothie with protein and green
powders in there. So the bone broth with egg yolks, that is your super food
drink, and that is category number two, wrapped up animal organs.
And the third category is the wonderful wild caught oily cold-water fish.
This is by far the best source of Omega threes in the human diet. And the
cool thing about this category is most of these are really affordable.

They&#39;re called the SMASH family, and that stands for sardines, mackerel,
anchovies, salmon, and herring. And you can get all of these and it can
form a true super food. One of the most nutrient dense foods on the planet
without busting your budget. And when it comes to salmon, we want to
emphasize wild caught salmon. Of course, that&#39;s affordable in a canned
form. And if you like to dine and have that as a meal centerpiece, please
be vigilant to try and avoid the very common popular farmed Atlantic
salmon. That&#39;s 80 to 90% of what&#39;s out there in the marketplace. That&#39;s
what you will almost always find at a restaurant unless otherwise stated
with great pride and distinction that they&#39;re serving wild caught salmon.
But the there&#39;s many objections about pollution and crowded conditions
and adding agents that are unhealthy to the salmon feed, especially the
dyes that turn their skin pink because in natural, a wild caught salmon will
be pink because of their high antioxidant diet. And then you&#39;re trying to
match that with these poor salmon that are raised in crowded pens with
vastly inferior nutritional profiles so much so that authorities like Dr.
Macola recommend not even consuming Atlantic salmon. So that&#39;s a
tough challenge, but you can definitely find affordable sources of
previously frozen wild caught salmon like at Costco, big box store, has
that for a really nice price point and emphasize the wild caught salmon
and then the other canned fish that are in this SMASH family.
And then next in the rankings is the family of shellfish. These are a great
source of Omega threes as well and also monitor on saturated fats, a
complete nutrient profile. That again, we&#39;re talking about ranking the most
nutrient dense foods on earth. And so anything in the shellfish family
blows away the top ranked vegetable foods, and that&#39;s just nutritional
science and facts and looking at the profile and the RDA of the various
vitamins, especially when you&#39;re talking about animal foods, vitamins, A,
D, E and K things that are very difficult to obtain in a plant-based diet. So
that&#39;s why shelfish land up here nicely. And that would be, we already
mentioned oysters and put them at top ranking. But we also have our
clams, crab, lobster, mussels, octopus, and scallops. Gee, where can I go
to find food like that to the sushi bar? Of course. So thumbs up for
Japanese cuisine. That&#39;s why they have some of the great longevity stats
on the planet. Is that deep consumption of the shellfish.
And if you think about the human migration across the earth, when we first
left East Africa, 60,000 years ago, a small population of humans has
ventured out and successfully populated the entire globe over the ensuing
45,000 years. They mostly followed the coastlines and were able to
indulge in the marine life that helped the human brain grow to be strong
and resilient and rise to the top of the food chain with our superior
intelligence. And that was largely attributed to the access to the nutrient
dense foods, especially the omega-3 rich sea and marine life. So if you, if

seafood and marine life is not a centerpiece of your diet honor your human
genetic expectation for health and make it so.
So then we go down to eggs. Eggs, the original life force, essence super
food. How can you get any better than that? They have things like coleen
and the B vitamin profiles that are off the charts in comparison to other
foods, especially the yolk. If you have any lingering sentiment that you
want to tone down your yolk consumption in the name of monitoring
cholesterol. This has been widely refuted by respected science. Most
particularly the Framingham study, which is the longest and largest
epidemiological study in the history of science. And that means studying
the effects of environment, dietary practices on health and longevity and
the residents of wonderful Framingham Massachusetts have been
followed intensively since 1948.

So generations of study looking at dietary patterns and some of the great
conclusions we have these quoted in the original primal blueprint by Dr.
Castillo, the leader of the Framingham study back when the quotes came
out, that there was absolutely no correlation between egg consumption
and blood cholesterol levels.
So if you try with devotion to lower your intake of dietary cholesterol, your
body will manufacture more cholesterol to meet your needs for this very
important agent in making hormones like testosterone and the other sex
hormones, the other adaptive hormones. So trying to reduce dietary
cholesterol is ill-advised, especially when it comes to crowding out one of
the most nutritious foods on the planet. Now big deal here in the egg
category is you really want to strive to source either locally grown from the
actual farm, the farmer&#39;s market from the hobbyist or a carton that has the
distinction of being pasture raised and certified humane. These are vastly
superior to the conventional eggs that are grown in the feed lot, the
chicken coop environment, where the chickens are fed and inferior
nutritional source of feed, rather than being allowed to graze on the open
lands and consume worms and bugs and grass, and get that high omega-
3 content that a pasture raised egg will have. Certified organic is better
than conventional egg, but with the wide availability of pasture raised
eggs, Oh my gosh, it&#39;s, you know, for the budget with spending a little
more on a dozen eggs than the cheap old, regular eggs, you&#39;re getting a
huge boost in nutrition and avoiding these offensive agents that can get
into a conventional dairy such as hormones, pesticides, and antibiotics
coming from the environment that the crowded animals live in.
Also cool idea in the egg topic is to go looking for some alternative eggs.
That&#39;s right. It&#39;s not just chickens that lay eggs, and you can find goose,
duck, quail, and ostrich, and go to town. You&#39;ll how big an ostrich egg is.

Oh my gosh, your fry one, and you have a giant morning breakfast. I find
duck eggs really easily in some of the better supermarkets. So I&#39;m fond of
duck eggs. They&#39;re larger and have a richer egg tastes than a chicken
egg. And of course, because these are so rare they haven&#39;t been mass
produced like the chicken egg, so you can find any kind of source for the
alternative eggs. And then look for the cartons that have stamped pasture
raised and certified humane.
And then we get down to the last category above the so-called steak line
from Kate Cretsinger and below the steak line. We&#39;re talking about stuff
that&#39;s still okay to eat, but not ranking with the super foods. And the last
category is red meat. Yes, indeed. It has a superior nutritional and fatty
acid profile to poultry, despite common headlines about red meat causing
cancer or people making that common quip that, Oh, I&#39;m trying to improve
my diet. So, I&#39;m just eating chicken and fish and put away red meat. Oh,
mercy. Okay. So the ranking system is what it is Robb Wolf, great
research on that with his book Wired to Eat and his Healthy Rebellion
podcast to go check that out for more information, and you really want to
try to source local or 100% grass-fed beef with bone-in cuts offering
additional nutritional benefits. That&#39;s the aforementioned collagen and
glycosaminoglycans that are found in bone broth as well. But that grass
fed is such an important distinction because we know about all the
objections from meat raised in concentrated animal feeding operations.
They contain their tissues; contain hormones, pesticides, and antibiotics
from the feed. They have to keep these animals away from illness in those
crowded conditions. So they have to feed them antibiotics. And although
there&#39;s not much difference in nutritional benefit from grass fed, that was
from the research that Rob Wolf offered on our podcast interview. You are
avoiding those objectionable chemicals and additives, and you&#39;re also
doing a solid for the planet because a grass-fed animal grazing on the
open range. There&#39;s great insights provided on Paul Saladin show
Fundamental Health and talking about his White Oak Pasture and Bel
Campo, and these great operations that are proving that a grass fed
properly run grass fed ranch can actually have a carbon sequestering
effect, a net positive carbon benefit to the planet because of how the
animals ruminate on the grass.
So in contrast to the concentrated animal feeding operations, which they
have that negative carbon footprint and all the bad stuff going into the
animals and the pollution, a grass fed animal, you can rest assured that
you are consuming the best possible option in that category. And just like I
mentioned, with the alternative eggs, you can get other sources of red
meat that are not so mass-produced things like Buffalo and bison and elk
and lamb and venison.

[05:00]

And if you go to wild idea, buffalo.com, you will learn a lot about the
wonderful animal that&#39;s roaming free on the open range as it has for tens
of thousands of years in the middle America and how much more humane
their lifestyle is and their slaughtering methods and everything in
comparison to the mass production. I believe the stat was 40 million cattle
are slaughtered every year in the United States versus 60,000 Buffalo.
And if you&#39;ve ever tried a ground Buffalo, Oh, delicious, same with the
Buffalo steaks, you&#39;re definitely getting a, a pleasant experience that you
might want to integrate into your diet. And then we have on the wonderful
chart that you&#39;re going to download after this show, or hopefully before the
show, the steak line, trying to emphasize in your meal choices and your
food shopping foods above the steak line that we just mentioned for a
quick recap of those categories on the top, the global all-stars of grass fed
liver, oysters, salmon roe, and caviar. Second are the animal organs,
mainly as liver. The number one super food along with bone broth, heart,
kidney. And if you can find things like sweet bread, Rocky Mountain,
oysters, and tripe, and always trying to source grass fed animals because
the nutrients are concentrated in the organs as well as the toxins.
So we want to make sure you can find grass fed and liver. And it&#39;s pretty
easy to find these days; especially online places like
uswellnessmeats.com have a great opportunity. You can get the
liverwurst, which tastes really great. And also the grass-fed organ meats.
I&#39;m buying their kidneys a lot, their liver and the pate the liverwurst. So that
was the animal organs category. Then we have the wild caught oily
coldwater fish, the SMASH, family of salmon, sardines, mackerel,
anchovies, salmon, and herring. Then we have the shellfish. We already
mentioned oysters on the all-star team. And then we have clams, crab,
lobster, mussels, octopus, and scallops. So go get yourself some sushi.
Then we have eggs looking for those pasture raised certified humane
cartons, and then maybe trying some alternative eggs. And then we have
red meat trying to find that grass fed with a high priority.
Then we have the steak line and down below the steak line, the next
category is chicken, turkey, and pork. The problem with these, the reason
they ranked below is because most of what we see in the marketplace is
corn or soy fed. And so their fatty acid profile is inferior to red meat. Of
course, now we can also find a lot of opportunities for organic or pasture
raised chicken or turkey. And the term for pork is heritage breed pork. So
if you go to my shopping page, Bradkearns.com. Look at the affiliates that
I associate with and recommend highly. One of them is butcher box click
on the Butcher Box link. And you will find that their entire selection is grass
fed meat, pasture raised chicken and turkey and heritage breed pork. So
it&#39;s a great membership opportunity to get this stuff shipped to your door.

The highest quality for a very affordable price, better than you might find if
you randomly go in shopping and your eyeballs pop at the price of grass-
fed beef. Okay.
So chicken, turkey, and pork, and then the next category are raw organic
high fat dairy products. So in the dairy category, you want to make a
blanket commitment to avoid all manner of conventional pasteurized and
low and non-fat dairy products. There&#39;s just too much objection here.
Particularly the hormones, pesticides, and antibiotics that are being dosed
into these animals when you&#39;re drinking your milk. So you got to go at the
very least, if you are drinking the homogenized pasteurized stuff, which is
what you mostly find, it&#39;s really hard to find raw milk. If you go to a good
store, you can find it. It&#39;s delicious, got so many nutritional benefits.
And interesting research on raw milk, by the way that, when they tried,
they did a a study with a large group of lactose intolerant citizens who
participated and they transitioned them over to raw milk and they
experienced none of the usual symptoms that they get from consuming
the pasteurized homogenized milk that&#39;s mainly presented in the
marketplace. Of course, raw milk has a slight risk of foodborne illness,
right? But mostly you&#39;re getting this product from a small operations, small
dairy farmers that are going direct to the market. I actually met a lady who
had a booth at a little kiosk in the grocery store, and she had driven from
her farm and was selling her raw milk right there in the refrigerator straight
from the farm. And we had a nice little chat about how her animals are
treated and cared for. And I scored some really delicious, raw milk, putting
it in my base for my smoothie.
So go for the raw stuff and including the other dairy products, like cheese,
cream cheese, heavy cream, sour cream, and full fat yogurt. We want to
go for the high fat stuff, none of that low fat or non-fat stuff.

[05:00]

Because again, when you&#39;re doing that, you&#39;re basically getting a sugar
bomb and lactose the form of sugar that&#39;s in dairy products is highly
problematic. Of course, we know that with a great portion of the world. I
believe it&#39;s 80% of the global population of adults are lactose intolerant as
adults. Okay. So with cheese, raw cheese is pretty rare, but you can find it
there&#39;s usually like one or two selections out of a hundred at a good
market where it&#39;s actually made from raw milk. Also in the favorable
category are the aged or the hard cheeses or the Brie, and then a raw
Keifer gets a plug there too, because that&#39;s maybe even more common
than raw milk.
You can find good sources of kefir and has a great probiotic profile. So
you can add that if you enjoy dairy and then going for the organic, for sure

when you&#39;re selecting cream, cheese, heavy cream and sour cream, and
again, dairy has long been an allowable food category in the primal, the
ancestral communication that we&#39;ve been talking about for over a decade,
but we never said it should be a dietary centerpiece. So this could be sort
of a, an accoutrement, especially if you enjoy it, maybe you&#39;ll have a bowl
of yogurt and a spoonful of Brad&#39;s Macadamia Masterpiece, and that
better on top stir it together, tastes really great, throw some cacao nibs in
there, a great little snack, but not a centerpiece. And we want to
emphasize the foods above the steak line for the centerpiece.
So the next category is the favorable or at least objectionable, most
nutritious plant foods. So the idea here is to integrate these foods
strategically for an assortment of reasons, one of them is that you want to
enjoy your life. And so this stuff tastes good and you like it.
Dark chocolate is on the list. I&#39;m going to integrate that for a number of
reasons. One of them is that has a great antioxidant flavonol, polyphenol
nutritional profile. You want to choose bean to bar in that category with
80% cacao or higher, you will quickly habituate to that, even if you&#39;re used
to consuming milk chocolate your whole life, and you&#39;ll become a
connoisseur of dark chocolate. I have a couple shows dedicated to the
topic of choosing the most nutritious and sustainably grown dark chocolate
bars. You want to get that bean to bar designation on the label. And that
means that the manufacturer knows where the source of these beans
came from.
They were carefully selected and it avoids the problematic reality that
most of the chocolate on the market today comes from a child labor
producing countries with minimal regulations in Africa and other places
along the equator. So if you find an affordable dark chocolate bar, you can
bet that you&#39;re consuming a product made with child labor. And that would
be a bar of two to three and a half ounces in the price point of $2 up to $4,
maybe, which is kind of what we expect to pay. But if you really want to
get a proper product with the best nutritional and the most sustainable and
eco-friendly benefits, you&#39;re looking to pay upwards of $3 per ounce.
So in other words, a quality bar is going to cost you 8, 9, 10, 11, $12 for
the same size that you see at Trader Joe&#39;s or the grocery store for $3.50
bar.
But if you want to get away from child labor, that&#39;s your commitment, is
look for that bean to bar designation. So integrating plant foods, I talked
about enjoying life and jumped right over to dark chocolate. There are
other reasons too. One of them is if you want to increase your
carbohydrate intake for recovery and glycogen replenishment, if you&#39;re
involved in a devoted fitness program improving insulin sensitivity,
because you have long periods of time where you&#39;re locked into eating in

ketogenic macronutrient profiles. Sometimes you can get this response
that might not be favorable. They call it metabolic insulin resistance, where
you&#39;re producing so little insulin that your body, your cells kind of become
insulin resistant because they haven&#39;t been fine tuned. They haven&#39;t given,
been given the workout of occasionally dosing on some carbohydrates
and processing those carbohydrates.
So also Elle Russ, you can hear her on the Primal Blueprint podcast and
her best-selling book. The Paleo Thyroid Solution talks about how,
especially in the female category, people suffering from thyroid
dysfunction might want to experiment with increased carbohydrate intake
to optimize thyroid and adrenal function, because it can be stressful to
especially drift away from a fuel source. That&#39;s been part of your diet for
your whole life. And then all of a sudden you&#39;re cutting it back to zero
could be perceived as a stressor by the body. And there is an assortment
of nutritious plant foods that you can probably integrate without much
trouble, unless you&#39;re one of those sensitive people.

And you can learn all about them at meatrx.Com. That&#39;s the organization
led by Dr. Sean Baker and an incredible assortment of healing stories. I
believe they have the stories organized by category. So if you are a
psoriasis sufferer, you can go click on that link and see people that have
righted their conditions, the amazing miracle healing stories that you can
see on that website from people that are excluding all plant foods or most
plant foods. So if you have leaky gut and you&#39;ve been suffering from a
chronic condition, that&#39;s inflammatory, or auto-immune by nature, you owe
it to yourself to do at least a 30 day total restriction of plant foods and see
how your body responds. And then start adding back strategically
particularly with the foods mentioned on this chart.
So I talked about dark chocolate. I talked a little bit about honey, but those
are one of them on the list and try to find raw honey, because it has
wonderful antioxidant antibacterial properties. And also if it&#39;s grown locally,
it can help you with seasonal allergies because of the agents that you&#39;re
getting in the honey. The bees did the hard work for you. So raw honey is
on the list. Avocado is a wonderful introduction of the mono unsaturated
fats and a very minimal concern about plant toxins. Dark chocolate, pretty
tolerable for most people.
Nuts and nut butters. This would probably be one of the categories of
higher sensitivity. So if you have difficulty digesting nuts, and remember
peanuts are in the legume family, not the nut family. So a peanut allergy is
not the same and some of those people can tolerate nuts, just fine. but
this is a definitely a personal choice, but of course there&#39;s a lot of
nutritional benefits in the nuts and nut butter family. And I&#39;m a big fan. I

don&#39;t seem to have any problem digesting the Brad&#39;s Macadamia
Masterpiece. Hopefully neither will you. You can learn more at
bradventures.com or check it out on Amazon. And again, this is way down
the list below the steak line and can probably be considered a treat or an
indulgence, or maybe a travel food. If you&#39;re going on a long car trip, and
you&#39;re going to be hitting the gas stations with poor options, you can pack
yourself a nice bag of almonds or macadamia nuts, but not a dietary
centerpiece.
Also on the plant food list is the family of fermented foods because of the
wonderful probiotic properties. So things like kefir, kimchi, kombucha,
miso, natto, olives, pickles, sauerkraut, tempe. And these nourish healthy
gut bacteria. But again, if you&#39;re battling leaky gut syndrome and you&#39;re
throwing down foods day after day, year after year, decade after decade,
even the fermented foods and the expensive capsules of probiotics,
probably aren&#39;t going to help you if you&#39;re gluten sensitive and you&#39;re still
eating bread and other wheat products and frozen, processed, packaged
foods, things that disturb healthy gut function. So the fermented foods are
great. As you embark on the process of sustaining healthy gut micro
biome and healing seaweed, also on the list, I think Dr. Axe had this as
the number one healthiest food on the planet. So it&#39;s a great source of
iodine, which is hard to get in the diet and related to healthy thyroid
function also has your vitamin D, B12, selenium, Omega 3, a true super
food of the planet.
And then we go to fruit and in the big family of fruit, there&#39;s some
distinction between the high antioxidant low-glycemic fruits, which would
be the most favorable. And this is the berry family predominate there also
the stone fruits are in that good category. And then when you go to the
other side of the spectrum, you have the high glycemic and low
antioxidant fruits which would be the family of tropical fruits, like mangoes,
papayas, pineapples. So those are the most sugary fruits and the berries
are the least likely to spike blood sugar and cause that insulin response,
and they have some better anti-oxidant properties. But if you&#39;re, you know,
doing a good job, eliminating the most irritating family of plants, the leafy
greens, the cruciferous the nuts and seeds, if that happens to be
something you&#39;re sensitive to, the fruit is certainly all favorable all across
the fruit spectrum for low sensitivity, low plant toxin.
So it can be integrating those. However I&#39;d like to mention great advice
from Dr. David Perlmutter, a best-selling author Grain Brain, one of the
leading figures in ancestral health, and he recommends not consuming
any fruit during the winter months, because this is aligned with our
ancestral experience where we did not get any form of carbohydrate
probably for many months on end, especially no fruit. So just trying to live
that ancestral lifestyle, you can put the fruit aside, especially because

most of the fruit you see has probably been transported from a distant
origin. If it&#39;s winter time, right? You&#39;re going to get some berries year round
at the big box store, but they&#39;ve been flown in from Chile. And so they
have a bad carbon footprint. They&#39;re not as fresh; they&#39;re not as teaming
with antioxidants and other nutrients as the stuff you find at the farmer&#39;s
market in the summer.

So go for it in the summer with those fresh berries. Oh my gosh. If I can
get my hands on some, doing a road trip up to Pacific Northwest Oregon,
Washington and finding these amazing roadside berries or picking them
yourself, Oh my gosh, open season. But then big difference from shopping
at the big box store in the middle of winter to get more of basically what it
amounts to a sugar dose.
And then finally, to, to complete this entire chart here in the bottom corner
are sweet potatoes and squash. So this starchy vegetables that has less
plant toxicity than the stuff that grows above the ground. A lot of other
benefits, including a healthy fiber, they believe to have some properties
that support gut bacteria, which is prebiotics. So that would also be called
resistance starch are indigestible fiber. And when you consume foods that
have prebiotics they take residents in your colon and become a healthy
gut bacteria.
The probiotics feed, the prebiotics or the gut bacteria that comes from
certain dietary sources. I know dark chocolate has a good level of
prebiotics. So do the starchy vegetables, sweet potatoes and squash. But
if you&#39;re really interested in this topic and you&#39;re trying to heal a broken
gut, you can get the best form, which would be a raw potato starch. So
you can take a teaspoon full starting slowly and putting that in your liquids
that you can consume or smoothie to try to rebuild that gut with a great
source of prebiotic fiber. Another sources of prebiotics are cooked and
cooled white rice and white potatoes, and also green bananas. So
indigestible fiber, right? The banana changes from green to yellow, where
it becomes mostly digestible carbohydrate high-glycemic carbohydrate by
the way. But when it’s green, you&#39;re getting a different experience and
you&#39;re not going to be you&#39;re not going to be consuming many carbs
because it hasn’t converted to carbs yet. So that&#39;s the Carnivore Scores
chart in comprehensive form.
Thank you for listening to the audio version. I think you&#39;re going to love
printing this colorful version out and putting it right on your refrigerator
door. So you can keep in mind where you stand on the scale on the
spectrum. Thank you for listening more at bradkearns.Com or
k84wellness.com.

 

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